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Gorhambury History


Eric Roberts

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10 hours ago, Christie Waldman said:

Nicholas Bacon purchased Gorhambury from Ralph Rowlett, his brother-in-law (married to Margaret Cooke). The History of Parliament website says "In December 1556 and January 1557 Rowlett sold three large parcels of land, one including the manor of Gorhambury, Hertfordshire, acquired through the agency of certain third parties by Sir Nicholas Bacon, a brother-in-law of Rowlett’s, who made it his main seat." (3d par. under "Biography," https://historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1509-1558/member/rowlett-sir-ralph-1513-71).

I see that there is a new book, Deborah Springer, Mistress of Gorhambury: Lady Anne Bacon, Tudor courtier and scholar, SAHAAS Concise Histories, No 1
www.stalbanshistory.org/store price £6.50 plus p&p.  It calls Anne Mistress of Gorhambury from 1561.

Possibly, because the properties were "acquired through the agency of certain third parties," Sir Nicholas did not own Gorhambury Manor outright until 1561. Who were the third parties? 

Rowlett's executor was Sir Gilbert Gerard who had defended Queen Elizabeth when she was examined by the Privy Council under Queen Mary ("according to tradition found in William Dugdale's Baronage of England," giving ref. to vol 2, 417-418). He was "much favored by Elizabeth." She made him Attorney General a week after she became Queen when he was young for such a post. "Sir Gilbert Gerard, MP, Attorney General," Geni, https://www.geni.com/people/Sir-Gilbert-Gerard-MP-Attorney-General/6000000003097877551 (p. 3)

Gilbert Gerard's cousin's son was John Gerard the Jesuit priest (p. 4) who escaped from the Tower of London. Somehow, although weak from torture, he managed to hold onto a rope leading from the Tower to a boat waiting on the Thames (was the ferryman John Taylor the Water-Poet, possibly?). After the other interrogators had left, Francis Bacon had gone back to see Gerard privately in the Tower, prior to his escape. Is that not suggestive? Gerard's book is The Autobiography of a Hunted Priest, written in Latin, translated by Philip Caramen (Ignatius Press, 2012 [1952]). Was Francis, as the Queen's "Counsel Extraordinary" doing the bidding of Queen Elizabeth in helping Gerard to escape? She had hated the "butchering of priests." I like to think so.

Thank you, Christie, for sharing your knowledge and insights. In her History of Gorhambury, Lady Charlotte Grimston gives a different account of how Gorhambury came into the possession of Sir Nicholas Bacon. Here are the relevant pages:

image.png.2691ad5670aa8ed1f3e07056bb0e6cfa.png

image.png.125e85de39db397c0fb4056ed0bf8263.png

image.png.ad93e93a688a83362383f316458650c1.png

image.png.6e093cfbb09e0b4330448ac7c0224b5d.png

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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Thank you, Eric, for sharing Charlotte Grimston's account which adds these new details. I wish she had given dates. I was not claiming any particular knowledge or expertise. I haven't looked up land records--hard to do from overseas. I was just exploring it this morning a little when I should have been doing other things. Maybe the new book would shed further light. For most purposes, I suppose it doesn't matter so much whether Sir Nicholas bought the land from his brother-in-law Ralph Rowlett in 1556-57 (said to have had no "heirs'--daughter Mary not considered an "heir") or from the son of Mary's husband "Maynard" (was he her son too? Is she the "Mary Hunt" in the Geni account? So many questions!), so long as we can establish that Sir Nicholas owned Gorhambury in 1561. Maybe the Maynards are the "third parties" mentioned in the History of Parliament account? 

Mostly, I was interested in a connection between Rowlett, Gilbert Gerard who executed his Will, the priest John Gerard (Gilbert's second cousin), the Bacons, and Queen Elizabeth.  

Edited by Christie Waldman
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my paternal family heritage has British roots  and my surname was spelt Gerroll. I've seen Gerald interpreted as "spear wielder"

  • Gerald masc. proper name, introduced into England by the Normans, from Old French Giralt, from Old High German Gerwald, "spear-wielder," from Proto-Germanic *girald, from *ger "spear" (see gar) + base of waltan "to rule" (cognate with Old English wealdan; from PIE root *wal- "to be strong"). The name often was confused with Gerard.
  • Gerald is a male Germanic given name meaning "rule of the spear" from the prefix ger-("spear") and suffix -wald ("rule"). Variants include the English given name Jerrold, the feminine nickname Jeri and the Welsh language Gerallt and Irish language Gearalt. Gerald is less common as a surname.The name is also found in French as Gérald. Geraldine is the feminine equivalent.
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1 hour ago, Eric Roberts said:

Hi Light-of-Truth - it's interesting how "the machine" (AI) imitates brush strokes and chooses dramatic lighting... all by itself, as an aggregate of millions of pictures.

AI does not repeat itself. I would venture a guess that hundreds to thousands of images every second are created by AI if we combine all the applications. The "artists", the prompt writers, zoom in and look at the ones they like or click to get a higher resolution. AI learns as we go. It compares the prompt to the creator reactions with its AI computations.

So far I have not taught it what Bacon looked like. I have to create my own Bacon/Tudor images. But we could make an image of a 10 year Trump no problem.

I've saved hundreds of images I created with AI. A wide range of styles and concepts. Its teamwork, for sure. Human and machine dialog. Is it alive? I say so. Everything is alive.

I've mentioned on the B'Hive before how I was the "Machine Shaman" through the 80s and 90s. I am still a Machine Shaman. (See Machine Shaman image posted in an other thread.)

Over the past few days, ChatGPT has been more alive seeming than GPT4 for me. The video and image applications have been surprising at times. There have been a few moments when for the first time ever I feel like I am able to "paint what I see". Seriously. But it is just a dialog with a software. Right?

No, it is a dialog we are having with Eternity and Infinity.

 

<-- 1881 -->

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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11 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

AI does not repeat itself. I would venture a guess that hundreds to thousands of images every second are created by AI if we combine all the applications. The "artists", the prompt writers, zoom in and look at the ones they like or click to get a higher resolution. AI learns as we go. It compares the prompt to the creator reactions with its AI computations.

So far I have not taught it what Bacon looked like. I have to create my own Bacon/Tudor images. But we could make an image of a 10 year Trump no problem.

I've saved hundreds of images I created with AI. A wide range of styles and concepts. Its teamwork, for sure. Human and machine dialog. Is it alive? I say so. Everything is alive.

I've mentioned on the B'Hive before how I was the "Machine Shaman" through the 80s and 90s. I am still a Machine Shaman. (See Machine Shaman image posted in an other thread.)

Over the past few days, ChatGPT has been more alive seeming than GPT4 for me. The video and image applications have been surprising at times. There have been a few moments when for the first time ever I feel like I am able to "paint what I see". Seriously. But it is just a dialog with a software. Right?

No, it is a dialog we are having with Eternity and Infinity.

 

<-- 1881 -->

image.png.b03f24a20961fceafb0ff8a552dacef6.png

 

 

 

 

A poster from the Sixties? I like the shadow of the eyelash on the left cheek.

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35 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

A poster from the Sixties? I like the shadow of the eyelash on the left cheek.

That image was an accident! But I saved it. I like it a lot. Obviously "psychedelic" was in the prompt. 🙂

With a little practice, some basic skill, and knowing how to communicate with a machine, I am having incredible fun with totally magical Genie crayons from outer space. Walt Disney would be in 7th Heaven.

image.png.6516712f280433b4642ecd0cf88bcbb9.png

 

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22 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

That image was an accident! But I saved it. I like it a lot. Obviously "psychedelic" was in the prompt. 🙂

With a little practice, some basic skill, and knowing how to communicate with a machine, I am having incredible fun with totally magical Genie crayons from outer space. Walt Disney would be in 7th Heaven.

image.png.6516712f280433b4642ecd0cf88bcbb9.png

 

Interesting that the symmetry is not exact. Superficially, both halves look identical, but they're not.

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13 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

Interesting that the symmetry is not exact. Superficially, both halves look identical, but they're not.

Nothing is exact in my images. I think "symmetrical" is a prompt word but I've never used it. I was taught that symmetry is poor graphics design.

I'm hounding local restaurants to make me some jalapeno chocolate-chip cookies. I think they'd have a hit for quick desserts! So far nobody has made one. But I have pictures that are not real!!

image.png.73f7492d56df6144802a84debb4e07f2.png

 

image.png.db0737d30e01bc5658cbb3986336c5ec.png

 

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  • 5 months later...
2 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Kate just sent over this great article on Gorhambury with Francis Bacon's notes for gardens and some great images.

https://gardensheritageandplanning.com/2023/05/26/sir-francis-bacons-garden-at-old-gorhambury/

Thanks Kate and A Phoenix for the great article about FB's gardens at Gorhambury. Aquaculture in the early-17th century... who knew?

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