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Portraits of Francis Bacon's Mother


Eric Roberts

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A wall frieze situated close to the Old Palace at Hatfield, Hertfordshire,

depicting characters from the court of Queen Elizabeth I.

The frieze was relocated to Hatfield House from the

Royal Exchange building after a fire inn 1855.

 

Elizabeth_I_frieze_sculpture_south_from_Old_Palace_Hatfield_House_Hertfordshire_England.jpeg.6fc968aa38fcec30ae05951272dee2e7.jpeg

Information about this group of sculptures is hard to find. When was it made? Is it Elizabethan or a later recreation?

The fourteen figures on either side of Elizabeth are portraits of specific people but there doesn't seem to be a list that identifies them.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Elizabeth_I_frieze_sculpture_south_from_Old_Palace_Hatfield_House_Hertfordshire_England.jpg

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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Hi Eric,

Extraordinary - have never seen this before. The figures are so precise in their features and clothes that they obviously represent real historical people from the period - which one is Francis? On first look I had a very strong sense it was Sir Nicholas Bacon at the back just peering over her right shoulder.

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Posted (edited)
36 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Eric,

Extraordinary - have never seen this before. The figures are so precise in their features and clothes that they obviously represent real historical people from the period - which one is Francis? On first look I had a very string sense it was Sir Nicholas Bacon at the back just peering over her right shoulder.

 I see what you and Yann are talking about. A very tempting possibility. Where is that list of names?!

ScreenShot2024-03-30at10_50_31pm.png.89538930c53a0db81f16eb9aad4d5209.png

 

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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12 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

Information about this group of sculptures is hard to find. When was it made? Is it Elizabethan or a later recreation?

The fourteen figures on either side of Elizabeth are portraits of specific people but there doesn't seem to be a list that identifies them.

I count 17 people if we count the faces that are hidden. That is including Elizabeth.

 

EDIT: Maybe 16. 🙂

Seeing different perspectives...

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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This is a sculpture by J.G. Bubb (1825) showing Queen Elizabeth opening the Royal Exchange on 23, January 1571.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Exchange,_London#:~:text=The Royal Exchange was officially,place until the 17th century.

https://crossroads-spacesofknowing.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/the-marketplace/the-royal-exchange

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._G._Bubb

Francis Bacon, who was 10 years old, is not there.

There is probably Thomas Gresham

http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/images/Gresham,Thomas(Sir).jpg

Here is a paper from 1838 that talks about "attendant figures and heralds"

https://www.google.fr/books/edition/the_mirror_of_literature_amusement_and_i/TkIFAAAAQAAJ?hl=fr&gbpv=1 ( Page 50)

 

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2 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

This is a sculpture by J.G. Bubb (1825) showing Queen Elizabeth opening the Royal Exchange on 23, January 1571.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Exchange,_London#:~:text=The Royal Exchange was officially,place until the 17th century.

https://crossroads-spacesofknowing.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/the-marketplace/the-royal-exchange

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._G._Bubb

Francis Bacon, who was 10 years old, is not there.

There is probably Thomas Gresham

http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/images/Gresham,Thomas(Sir).jpg

Here is a paper from 1838 that talks about "attendant figures and heralds"

https://www.google.fr/books/edition/the_mirror_of_literature_amusement_and_i/TkIFAAAAQAAJ?hl=fr&gbpv=1 ( Page 50)

 

Hi Allisnum2er - you are amazing.

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Thanks to Eric and Yann for this great information. Thomas Gresham founder of The Royal Exchange had extensive links to the Bacons and the below includes a lovely reference to Francis as 'good brother Francke'.

BACON & GRESHAM FAMILY LINKS

 On 5 April 1540 Nicholas Bacon married his first wife Jane Ferneley and Thomas Gresham the future financial agent to Queen Elizabeth married her sister Anne Ferneley from which time the brothers-in-law had a very close relationship through the next four decades. The marriage with Nicholas and Jane produced seven children before she died in 1552. A generation later Sir Nicholas arranged the marriage of their second son Nathaniel Bacon to Anne, the illegitimate daughter of his brother-in-law Sir Thomas Gresham and his mistress Anne Dutton, which took place in July 1569, probably attended by his younger half-brothers Francis and Anthony Bacon.

Their respective fathers Lord Keeper Sir Nicholas Bacon and royal financier Thomas Gresham endowed them with half-a-dozen estates in Suffolk and Norfolk which yielded a large annual income in the twin counties of East Anglia where Sir Nathaniel Bacon assumed a leading role in its government and prosperity. 1

Immediately after their marriage Nathaniel arranged for his new young bride to be placed with his mother Lady Bacon for her education at Gorhambury alongside her two sons Francis and Anthony. Some years later Nathaniel expressed his gratitude to his step-mother Lady Bacon for all the love and care she took in educating and looking after his young wife:

Your ladyship knoweth how, being matched in marriage as I am, it stood me upon to have some care of the well bringing up of my wife, for these words of Erasmus are very true: plus est bene instrui quam bene nasci [it is better to have been well instructed than well born]. If she should have had the want of both, I had just cause to fear what might befall. Hereupon, being not able to remedy the one, I did as much as in me lay to provide for the other, and therefore I sought by all the means I could to have her placed with your ladyship. This is for which I think myself so greatly beholding to your ladyship, in that you were content to trouble yourself with having my wife, and not that alone, but during her being with you to have such care over her and better to use her than I myself could have wished. Yea, I often said, and yet say, a more strait manner of usage would have wrought a greater good. Yet such was your ladyship’s goodwill, which I will not live to be unmindful of: for the care had of her, I account it had of me; the good done to her, I account it done to me, for I persuade myself it done in respect of me. 2

 The recipient of her care and good will Anne Gresham Bacon wrote to Lady Bacon to express her wholehearted appreciation for the ‘great care’ that she had shown her during her time at Gorhambury recalling with affection the memories of her shared lessons with Francis and Anthony, requesting Lady Bacon send her warmest ‘commendacions to my brother Anthonie &; my good brother Franck.’ 3

When their first child was born in 1573 Anne Gresham Bacon asked her mother-in-law to be godmother to their daughter to which the proud Lady Bacon immediately responded by sending two pieces of gold to the nurse and midwife with the promise of a special gift for the newborn to be sent after it had arrived from London.4 From 1578 Sir Nathaniel and Lady Anne Gresham Bacon settled at Stiffkey Hall and it is in his surviving papers that important letters and information about the relationship between the Bacons and the Greshams is documented including letters to her father Sir ThomasGresham.5

On 20 February 1579 the great Lord Keeper of the Realm Sir Nicholas Bacon died. His brother-in-law and old friend Sir Thomas Gresham attended his memorable state-like funeral alongside his other brother-in-law Sir William Cecil, Lord Burghley, Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, the head of the English Secret Service Sir Francis Walsingham, the Master of the Rolls, Solicitor-General, Attorney-General, and other state and government officials.6

Just six months later Sir Thomas Gresham died and was buried on 21 November at St Helen’s Church, Bishopsgate in the City of London.

It was during the years from 1565 to 1579 that Sir Thomas Gresham founded and built what became known as the Royal Exchange.

 

1. Robert Tittler, Nicholas Bacon: The Making of a Tudor Statesman (Ohio University Press, 1976), pp. 51, 82, 110, 152, 154.

2. A. Hassel Smith, Gillian M. Baker and R. W. Kenny, eds., The Papers Of Nathaniel Bacon (University of East Anglia, 1979), I, p. 23. For the convenience of the reader I have followed the modernised spelling by Lisa Jardine and Alan Stewart, Hostage to Fortune The Troubled Life of Francis Bacon (London: Victor Gollancz, 1998), p. 33.

3. A. Hassel Smith, Gillian M. Baker and R. W. Kenny, eds., The Papers Of Nathaniel Bacon (University of East Anglia, 1979), I, p. 23; Robert Tittler, Nicholas Bacon: The Making of a Tudor Statesman (Ohio University Press, 1976), p. 156; Lisa Jardine and Alan Stewart, Hostage to Fortune The Troubled Life of Francis Bacon (London: Victor Gollancz, 1998), p. 34.

4. A. Hassel Smith, Gillian M. Baker and R. W. Kenny, eds., The Papers Of Nathaniel Bacon (University of East Anglia, 1979), I, p. 81; Lisa Jardine and Alan Stewart, Hostage to Fortune The Troubled Life of Francis Bacon (London: Victor Gollancz, 1998), p. 34.

 5. A. Hassel Smith, Gillian M. Baker and R. W. Kenny, eds., The Papers Of Nathaniel Bacon (University of East Anglia, 1979-90), Volumes I, II and III, passim.

 6. A. Hassel Smith, Gillian M. Baker and R. W. Kenny, eds., The Papers Of Nathaniel Bacon (University of East Anglia, 1983), II, pp. 47-48.

Stunning portrait of Thomas Gresham, aged approximately 41 from the collection of the Rijksmuseum & Sir Nicholas Bacon by an unknown artist, 1579

 

Anthonis_Mor_004.jpg

330px-Sir_Nicholas_Bacon.jpeg

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

Thanks to Eric and Yann for this great information. Thomas Gresham founder of The Royal Exchange had extensive links to the Bacons and the below includes a lovely reference to Francis as 'good brother Francke'.

BACON & GRESHAM FAMILY LINKS

 On 5 April 1540 Nicholas Bacon married his first wife Jane Ferneley and Thomas Gresham the future financial agent to Queen Elizabeth married her sister Anne Ferneley from which time the brothers-in-law had a very close relationship through the next four decades. The marriage with Nicholas and Jane produced seven children before she died in 1552. A generation later Sir Nicholas arranged the marriage of their second son Nathaniel Bacon to Anne, the illegitimate daughter of his brother-in-law Sir Thomas Gresham and his mistress Anne Dutton, which took place in July 1569, probably attended by his younger half-brothers Francis and Anthony Bacon.

Their respective fathers Lord Keeper Sir Nicholas Bacon and royal financier Thomas Gresham endowed them with half-a-dozen estates in Suffolk and Norfolk which yielded a large annual income in the twin counties of East Anglia where Sir Nathaniel Bacon assumed a leading role in its government and prosperity. 1

Immediately after their marriage Nathaniel arranged for his new young bride to be placed with his mother Lady Bacon for her education at Gorhambury alongside her two sons Francis and Anthony. Some years later Nathaniel expressed his gratitude to his step-mother Lady Bacon for all the love and care she took in educating and looking after his young wife:

Your ladyship knoweth how, being matched in marriage as I am, it stood me upon to have some care of the well bringing up of my wife, for these words of Erasmus are very true: plus est bene instrui quam bene nasci [it is better to have been well instructed than well born]. If she should have had the want of both, I had just cause to fear what might befall. Hereupon, being not able to remedy the one, I did as much as in me lay to provide for the other, and therefore I sought by all the means I could to have her placed with your ladyship. This is for which I think myself so greatly beholding to your ladyship, in that you were content to trouble yourself with having my wife, and not that alone, but during her being with you to have such care over her and better to use her than I myself could have wished. Yea, I often said, and yet say, a more strait manner of usage would have wrought a greater good. Yet such was your ladyship’s goodwill, which I will not live to be unmindful of: for the care had of her, I account it had of me; the good done to her, I account it done to me, for I persuade myself it done in respect of me. 2

 The recipient of her care and good will Anne Gresham Bacon wrote to Lady Bacon to express her wholehearted appreciation for the ‘great care’ that she had shown her during her time at Gorhambury recalling with affection the memories of her shared lessons with Francis and Anthony, requesting Lady Bacon send her warmest ‘commendacions to my brother Anthonie &; my good brother Franck.’ 3

When their first child was born in 1573 Anne Gresham Bacon asked her mother-in-law to be godmother to their daughter to which the proud Lady Bacon immediately responded by sending two pieces of gold to the nurse and midwife with the promise of a special gift for the newborn to be sent after it had arrived from London.4 From 1578 Sir Nathaniel and Lady Anne Gresham Bacon settled at Stiffkey Hall and it is in his surviving papers that important letters and information about the relationship between the Bacons and the Greshams is documented including letters to her father Sir ThomasGresham.5

On 20 February 1579 the great Lord Keeper of the Realm Sir Nicholas Bacon died. His brother-in-law and old friend Sir Thomas Gresham attended his memorable state-like funeral alongside his other brother-in-law Sir William Cecil, Lord Burghley, Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, the head of the English Secret Service Sir Francis Walsingham, the Master of the Rolls, Solicitor-General, Attorney-General, and other state and government officials.6

Just six months later Sir Thomas Gresham died and was buried on 21 November at St Helen’s Church, Bishopsgate in the City of London.

It was during the years from 1565 to 1579 that Sir Thomas Gresham founded and built what became known as the Royal Exchange.

 

1. Robert Tittler, Nicholas Bacon: The Making of a Tudor Statesman (Ohio University Press, 1976), pp. 51, 82, 110, 152, 154.

2. A. Hassel Smith, Gillian M. Baker and R. W. Kenny, eds., The Papers Of Nathaniel Bacon (University of East Anglia, 1979), I, p. 23. For the convenience of the reader I have followed the modernised spelling by Lisa Jardine and Alan Stewart, Hostage to Fortune The Troubled Life of Francis Bacon (London: Victor Gollancz, 1998), p. 33.

3. A. Hassel Smith, Gillian M. Baker and R. W. Kenny, eds., The Papers Of Nathaniel Bacon (University of East Anglia, 1979), I, p. 23; Robert Tittler, Nicholas Bacon: The Making of a Tudor Statesman (Ohio University Press, 1976), p. 156; Lisa Jardine and Alan Stewart, Hostage to Fortune The Troubled Life of Francis Bacon (London: Victor Gollancz, 1998), p. 34.

4. A. Hassel Smith, Gillian M. Baker and R. W. Kenny, eds., The Papers Of Nathaniel Bacon (University of East Anglia, 1979), I, p. 81; Lisa Jardine and Alan Stewart, Hostage to Fortune The Troubled Life of Francis Bacon (London: Victor Gollancz, 1998), p. 34.

 5. A. Hassel Smith, Gillian M. Baker and R. W. Kenny, eds., The Papers Of Nathaniel Bacon (University of East Anglia, 1979-90), Volumes I, II and III, passim.

 6. A. Hassel Smith, Gillian M. Baker and R. W. Kenny, eds., The Papers Of Nathaniel Bacon (University of East Anglia, 1983), II, pp. 47-48.

Stunning portrait of Thomas Gresham, aged approximately 41 from the collection of the Rijksmuseum & Sir Nicholas Bacon by an unknown artist, 1579

 

Anthonis_Mor_004.jpg

330px-Sir_Nicholas_Bacon.jpeg

 

Another Portrait of Sir Thomas Gresham

 

GreshamThomas(Sir).jpeg.ec582940a67afc2ab6e1b3d46375456f.jpeg

 

http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/Bios/ThomasGresham.htm

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Thanks to Eric and Yann for this great information. Thomas Gresham founder of The Royal Exchange had extensive links to the Bacons and the below includes a lovely reference to Francis as 'good brother Francke'.

BACON & GRESHAM FAMILY LINKS

 On 5 April 1540 Nicholas Bacon married his first wife Jane Ferneley and Thomas Gresham the future financial agent to Queen Elizabeth married her sister Anne Ferneley from which time the brothers-in-law had a very close relationship through the next four decades. The marriage with Nicholas and Jane produced seven children before she died in 1552. A generation later Sir Nicholas arranged the marriage of their second son Nathaniel Bacon to Anne, the illegitimate daughter of his brother-in-law Sir Thomas Gresham and his mistress Anne Dutton, which took place in July 1569, probably attended by his younger half-brothers Francis and Anthony Bacon.

Their respective fathers Lord Keeper Sir Nicholas Bacon and royal financier Thomas Gresham endowed them with half-a-dozen estates in Suffolk and Norfolk which yielded a large annual income in the twin counties of East Anglia where Sir Nathaniel Bacon assumed a leading role in its government and prosperity. 1

Immediately after their marriage Nathaniel arranged for his new young bride to be placed with his mother Lady Bacon for her education at Gorhambury alongside her two sons Francis and Anthony. Some years later Nathaniel expressed his gratitude to his step-mother Lady Bacon for all the love and care she took in educating and looking after his young wife:

Your ladyship knoweth how, being matched in marriage as I am, it stood me upon to have some care of the well bringing up of my wife, for these words of Erasmus are very true: plus est bene instrui quam bene nasci [it is better to have been well instructed than well born]. If she should have had the want of both, I had just cause to fear what might befall. Hereupon, being not able to remedy the one, I did as much as in me lay to provide for the other, and therefore I sought by all the means I could to have her placed with your ladyship. This is for which I think myself so greatly beholding to your ladyship, in that you were content to trouble yourself with having my wife, and not that alone, but during her being with you to have such care over her and better to use her than I myself could have wished. Yea, I often said, and yet say, a more strait manner of usage would have wrought a greater good. Yet such was your ladyship’s goodwill, which I will not live to be unmindful of: for the care had of her, I account it had of me; the good done to her, I account it done to me, for I persuade myself it done in respect of me. 2

 The recipient of her care and good will Anne Gresham Bacon wrote to Lady Bacon to express her wholehearted appreciation for the ‘great care’ that she had shown her during her time at Gorhambury recalling with affection the memories of her shared lessons with Francis and Anthony, requesting Lady Bacon send her warmest ‘commendacions to my brother Anthonie &; my good brother Franck.’ 3

When their first child was born in 1573 Anne Gresham Bacon asked her mother-in-law to be godmother to their daughter to which the proud Lady Bacon immediately responded by sending two pieces of gold to the nurse and midwife with the promise of a special gift for the newborn to be sent after it had arrived from London.4 From 1578 Sir Nathaniel and Lady Anne Gresham Bacon settled at Stiffkey Hall and it is in his surviving papers that important letters and information about the relationship between the Bacons and the Greshams is documented including letters to her father Sir ThomasGresham.5

On 20 February 1579 the great Lord Keeper of the Realm Sir Nicholas Bacon died. His brother-in-law and old friend Sir Thomas Gresham attended his memorable state-like funeral alongside his other brother-in-law Sir William Cecil, Lord Burghley, Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, the head of the English Secret Service Sir Francis Walsingham, the Master of the Rolls, Solicitor-General, Attorney-General, and other state and government officials.6

Just six months later Sir Thomas Gresham died and was buried on 21 November at St Helen’s Church, Bishopsgate in the City of London.

It was during the years from 1565 to 1579 that Sir Thomas Gresham founded and built what became known as the Royal Exchange.

 

1. Robert Tittler, Nicholas Bacon: The Making of a Tudor Statesman (Ohio University Press, 1976), pp. 51, 82, 110, 152, 154.

2. A. Hassel Smith, Gillian M. Baker and R. W. Kenny, eds., The Papers Of Nathaniel Bacon (University of East Anglia, 1979), I, p. 23. For the convenience of the reader I have followed the modernised spelling by Lisa Jardine and Alan Stewart, Hostage to Fortune The Troubled Life of Francis Bacon (London: Victor Gollancz, 1998), p. 33.

3. A. Hassel Smith, Gillian M. Baker and R. W. Kenny, eds., The Papers Of Nathaniel Bacon (University of East Anglia, 1979), I, p. 23; Robert Tittler, Nicholas Bacon: The Making of a Tudor Statesman (Ohio University Press, 1976), p. 156; Lisa Jardine and Alan Stewart, Hostage to Fortune The Troubled Life of Francis Bacon (London: Victor Gollancz, 1998), p. 34.

4. A. Hassel Smith, Gillian M. Baker and R. W. Kenny, eds., The Papers Of Nathaniel Bacon (University of East Anglia, 1979), I, p. 81; Lisa Jardine and Alan Stewart, Hostage to Fortune The Troubled Life of Francis Bacon (London: Victor Gollancz, 1998), p. 34.

 5. A. Hassel Smith, Gillian M. Baker and R. W. Kenny, eds., The Papers Of Nathaniel Bacon (University of East Anglia, 1979-90), Volumes I, II and III, passim.

 6. A. Hassel Smith, Gillian M. Baker and R. W. Kenny, eds., The Papers Of Nathaniel Bacon (University of East Anglia, 1983), II, pp. 47-48.

Stunning portrait of Thomas Gresham, aged approximately 41 from the collection of the Rijksmuseum & Sir Nicholas Bacon by an unknown artist, 1579

 

Anthonis_Mor_004.jpg

330px-Sir_Nicholas_Bacon.jpeg

 

Hi A Phoenix

The marvellous portrait of Thomas Gresham that you posted above is in the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam and was painted by Antonis Mor between 1560-65. It is one of a pair of portraits by Mor. The other companion picture is of Anne Fernely.

 

portraits-of-sir-thomas-gresham-and-anne-fernely-anthonis-mor.jpeg.120691c571684f3648e10a13fa4f7fe4.jpeg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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On 2/8/2023 at 11:53 PM, A Phoenix said:

Great find Eric!

The Essex Ring from:

https://www.academia.edu/48910078/Francis_Bacon_and_his_earliest_Shakespeare_play_Hamlet_A_Tudor_Family_Tragedy

pp.26-28

Years earlier it is said that Queen Elizabeth had given Essex a ring which if he ever forfeited her favour, if he sent it back to her, its return would ensure his pardon and forgiveness. His royal brother Francis knew that Essex had only to return the ring and all would be forgiven. He may also have been informed that Essex had sent it. But the queen never received the ring. Elizabeth was incredulous that Essex even at his lowest point and with his life in imminent danger did not possess the humility to send the ring it to her. It reinforced her deeply held fears that her concealed son would forever remain unruly and dangerous and she finally signed his death warrant. In those last days while fearing for his life in the Beauchamp Tower (part of the Tower of London) where he was imprisoned before his execution in the face of imminent death Robert Tudor carved into the stone wall his true name over the door way which can still be seen to this present day ‘ROBART TIDIR’, an old way of spelling ROBERT TUDOR, conveying his status as a concealed royal prince of England.

Locked in the Tower and condemned to death Essex had given the ring to a boy with instructions to pass it to Lady Scrope a Gentlewoman of the Privy Chamber to give to Elizabeth. Instead the page boy mistakenly gave the ring to her sister Katherine, the Countess of Nottingham, wife of Charles Howard, first Earl of Nottingham, Essex’s sworn enemy. A relative of Queen Elizabeth and Gentlewoman of the Privy Chamber the Countess of Nottingham had been a close friend of Elizabeth’s for more than fifty years. She was privy to the significance of the ring and her husband fearing reprisals from Essex if he lived implored her to keep it for their own protection and survival. Thus while Essex lay in the Tower facing death agonisingly waiting for a reprieve from his mother Queen Elizabeth and she too waited night after night, sleepless and weeping, desperate for her son Essex to send the ring that would save his life, it never came and he was executed. Following his death what life Elizabeth had left slowly began to drain out of her and with it her mind began to deteriorate plaguing her to the end of her days.

 Perhaps resulting from the guilt of her actions not long after Essex’s execution the health of the Countess of Nottingham’s also began to deteriorate and steadily decline. As she lay dying on her deathbed she received a visit from Queen Elizabeth to whom she confessed that she wilfully withheld the ring. Immediately overcome by a violent passion Elizabeth grabbed the dying woman and in an inconsolable rage spat out a torrent of unrepeatable expletives ending with the exclamation “God may forgive you, Madam, but I never can!”. With the words of Queen Elizabeth still ringing in her ears Lady Nottingham soon after died at Arundel House on 24 February 1603, a death which precipitated Elizabeth’s final decline. 

Why would Essex not give the ring to Francis Bacon to deliver to Elizabeth?

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9 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

 

Hi A Phoenix

The marvellous portrait of Thomas Gresham that you posted above is in the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam and was painted by Antonis Mor between 1560-65. It is one of a pair of portraits by Mor. The other companion picture is of Anne Fernely.

 

portraits-of-sir-thomas-gresham-and-anne-fernely-anthonis-mor.jpeg.120691c571684f3648e10a13fa4f7fe4.jpeg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Portraits of Sir Thomas Gresham and Anne Fernely

Artist: Anthonis Mor          Date: c. 1560 - 1565

   

Mor-Portrait-Thomas-Gresham-1-1811x2160.jpeg.46303ea26be7e9f875cb07ca0f428614.jpeg

 

AnneFernely.jpeg.af4ca8211c242219529802178fc70590.jpeg

 

Anthonis_Mor_Self_Portrait_1558.jpeg.a9a00537ac3e8516e08a2a9935ab0b53.jpeg

Anthonis Mor, self portrait, 1558

 

https://canon.codart.nl/artwork/portrait-of-sir-thomas-gresham-and-his-wife-anne-ferneley/

https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/collection/SK-A-3119

 

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Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, Lawrence Gerald said:

Why would Essex not give the ring to Francis Bacon to deliver to Elizabeth?

https://www.westminster-abbey.org/teaching-resources/the-so-called-essex-ring

 

English_School_Portrait_of_a_Lady_1595-1606.png.41f5260ac8bc0e6a091b2fc2d75db082.png

Portrait believed to be of Catherine Howard, Countess of Nottingham, attributed to Robert Peake the Elder and his studio, c. 1597

 

Robert Devereux entrusted the ring given to him by his mother, Elizabeth I, to a passing youth. Oblivious of the fact that the sender's life depended on it reaching the Queen, the boy misinterpreted the identity of the intended recipient. It should have been delivered to Lady Philadelphia Scrope, Baroness of Bolton (no portrait). She was an Essex sympathiser, her husband having fought beside Robert Devereux, the Earl of Essex, who later knighted him. Instead, the ring was delivered to Lady Scrope's sister, the Countess of Nottingham. Both were the daughters of Sir Henry Carey, 1st Baron of Hudson. Lady Howard is said to have shown the ring to her husband, who concealed the delivery of the ring from the Queen, thus preventing any last minute reprieve for Devereux, whom he probably regarded as a traitor.

As a footnote, some believe that it was Philadelphia Scrope who took a blue sapphire ring from the finger of the dead queen and threw it down to her brother, Robert Carey, who rode for three days to deliver the ring to James VI in Scotland as a sign that Elizabeth had died. 

 

A Phoenix replied very informatively to this subject some time ago.

https://www.academia.edu/48910078/Francis_Bacon_and_his_earliest_Shakespeare_play_Hamlet_A_Tudor_Family_Tragedy

 

ScreenShot2024-04-01at7_54_17pm.png.2add7568688c70db6f2f4abbba4b9ca9.png

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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Posted (edited)
18 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

https://www.westminster-abbey.org/teaching-resources/the-so-called-essex-ring

 

English_School_Portrait_of_a_Lady_1595-1606.png.41f5260ac8bc0e6a091b2fc2d75db082.png

Portrait believed to be of Catherine Howard, Countess of Nottingham, attributed to Robert Peake the Elder and his studio, c. 1597

 

Robert Devereux entrusted the ring given to him by his mother, Elizabeth I, to a passing youth. Oblivious of the fact that the sender's life depended on it reaching the Queen, the boy misinterpreted the identity of the intended recipient. It should have been delivered to Lady Philadelphia Scrope, Baroness of Bolton (no portrait). She was an Essex sympathiser, her husband having fought beside Robert Devereux, the Earl of Essex, who later knighted him. Instead, the ring was delivered to Lady Scrope's sister, the Countess of Nottingham. Both were the daughters of Sir Henry Carey, 1st Baron of Hudson. Lady Howard is said to have shown the ring to her husband, who concealed the delivery of the ring from the Queen, thus preventing any last minute reprieve for Devereux, whom he probably regarded as a traitor.

As a footnote, some believe that it was Philadelphia Scrope who took a blue sapphire ring from the finger of the dead queen and threw it down to her brother, Robert Carey, who rode for three days to deliver the ring to James VI in Scotland as a sign that Elizabeth had died. 

 

A Phoenix replied very informatively to this subject some time ago.

https://www.academia.edu/48910078/Francis_Bacon_and_his_earliest_Shakespeare_play_Hamlet_A_Tudor_Family_Tragedy

 

ScreenShot2024-04-01at7_54_17pm.png.2add7568688c70db6f2f4abbba4b9ca9.png

 

 

RE: "SPEAR-SHAKER" THE MOVIE / MINI SERIES

The personal and political crisis of the so-called Essex Rebellion would provide a ready-made 'episode' in a movie about the (real) life of Lord Bacon. Peter Dawkins' essay https://www.fbrt.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Francis_Bacon_Shakespeare__the_Earl_of_Essex.pdf could be adapted as a script - at least, that's how I read it.

 

 

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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