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Francis Bacon's Pleading


Allisnum2er

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40 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

SONNET 33

At the top we have the special number 33 Bacon in simple cipher and below the number 34: 33+34=67 Francis in simple cipher which gives us Francis Bacon and in the Sonnet itself there are 110 words: 67+110=177 William Shakespeare in simple cipher again cryptically revealing to us that Francis Bacon is Shakespeare.

33s.png

Sonnet 33.png

So simple ! So elegant ! Straight to the point ! Well spotted A Phoenix ! ❤️ 

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3 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

Good morning A Phoenix,

Thank you again for your many kind words, for your appreciation of my work and for your support.  

Here is something  that I think will be of particular interest to you. 😊

I will have no more surprises in my upcoming videos but anyway !

(Just kidding, I still have some surprises on hand 😉)

image.png.64555fbdd01c2287fed37d9e3bfe64f9.png

Using the TWO in acrostic , count the second capital Letter from the Beginning and from the End of the poem.

(I am Alpha and Omega)

You obtain F.B. ( Francis Bacon)

Now trace a line from F to B and  DROESHUT appears ! 😊

You may recall my video "GIFT OF GOD" and the anagrams of DROESHOUT.

Here DROESHUT gives us TUDOR and ESH.

 

nice bit of lateral thinking. well done. never saw that one. though some will say it's not possible, even when you show it to be true. i like it.

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The man in the moone was not a buffoon

 

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2 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

SONNET 33

At the top we have the special number 33 Bacon in simple cipher and below the number 34: 33+34=67 Francis in simple cipher which gives us Francis Bacon and in the Sonnet itself there are 110 words: 67+110=177 William Shakespeare in simple cipher again cryptically revealing to us that Francis Bacon is Shakespeare.

33s.png

Sonnet 33.png

There's an obvious suggestion of the darkening of the Sun here, and it goes all the way to the darkening of the heavenly Sun which staineth lives. This is a Platonic reference to the two Suns, the celestial one and the one which confers the divine luminosity. One gives us the wonderful visuals mentioned. It is subject to being clouded and being unseen to the West of its Easterly rising. The divine Sun is also an Eastern Sun. It is symbolically given to us as the brightness emanating from the position of Jerusalem where the flattened mountain top is Mount Moriah. When we cannot see it from the West it means that we, as Westerners, have lost our Godly ways (a point of the Reformation).

The reference to alchemy is most likely suggesting that the word count here is 111, which I get, but it's unclear what exactly counts for a word or not to each and every observer. To have made Sonnet 33 contain this is also a very good use of alchemical reference, as we have seen with Kunrath's use of it. It, of course, governs the overlapping of cycles in the Great Cycle that Shakespeare loves to refer to with his references to "going full circle". When the clouding is full circle that has an alchemical meaning too.

The mention of the "he was but one hour mine" is interesting.  The solar eclipse of 1651 occurred shortly after 1 pm Greenwich time, allowing one to say that the Sun was shown for all hours but one at one on that day.

33 and 34 are certainly Bacon (33) and Francis (67), but they also work to divide 100 in 1/3 and 2/3 tranches (the reciprocal of both is the 3:1 trinity and the 3:2 Pythagorean harmonic). If you apply these to the globe from Mount Moriah you will delineate Paris and then Bacon's beloved NA point of greatest harmony. Bacon seems to have further refined these tranches by using Plato's reference to Atlantis being beyond the Pillars from Heliopolis where the legend had been given to Solon. 

In the first folio dedication "To The Reader" a geometric consideration leads us to a point between words 33 and 34. This could be seen as a call to go read what is here. I sense all things align that way. 

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re that book I said I have, methinks it is lost. I bought it on the advice of one Peter Farey M.A. (Marlovian publisher) but I never copied the only bit that interested me, namely the original tomb and epitaph lettering at Stratford on Avon. Anyway, in case you decide to take it further here are the details:

'Shakespeare' by F. E. Halliday.  (with 151 illustrations).

I had the paperback secondhand, cost me £2.50p.

If it ever turns up, I will publish the relevant image.

I found a copy on Ebay, going really cheap: £2.60p.

But no need to worry, I've found the book. It was published in 1956, so monochrome only. The photos are a bit poor, and I used my phone to copy, but I'm certain that the mark above the initial I in IESVS is not a graver's dimple, compare with the one at the end of STONES. If you look carefully you will see that the mark in question is offset from the center of the I.

 

 

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The man in the moone was not a buffoon

 

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1 hour ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

The reference to alchemy is most likely suggesting that the word count here is 111, which I get, but it's unclear what exactly counts for a word or not to each and every observer.

Hi CJ,

As I told you few days ago, this is all the interest and beauty of the use of words with hyphen. Both your count and the one of A Phoenix are correct : 111 words if we count for-lorne as 2 words , 110 words if we count for-lorne as 1 word 🙂.

By the way, 111 is also the Kay cipher of BACON and FREE, suggesting that the Kay cipher is in play.

And by using the process of A phoenix, it gives us : 33 + 111 + 34 = 178 that is the Kay cipher of ... WILL TUDOR ! 

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Yesterday, two independant research led me to page 33 of Titus Andronicus (First Folio 1623)

2029948951_2023-03-11(12).png.8d75364d1904d85191c4479a16523474.png

Lavinia is a character of Titus Andronicus

Then, I realised that I had never explored the page 33 of Titus Andronicus despite the fact that it is a page 33

(33 = BACON simple cipher), that Titus Andronicus would be the very first Tragedy written by SHAKESPEARE/BACON

and that the play would have been written in 1593 when Bacon was 33 years old.

So, I finally took a closer look at this page, and here is what I found ! 🙂 

2023-03-11.png.1ff9a350681cd1ff9a64cb50dd0be496.png

In ACROSTIC ...

1599538991_2023-03-11(1).png.656265ec542a8672c860f7cdf2592700.png

Notice the TT and Alpha and Omega in acrostic.

1586739227_2023-03-11(2).png.159b657c2adb2480c043d512b7af70c6.png

179465889_2023-03-11(3).png.0a9899cb850e639be28dc59e0a84d506.png

All the Capital Letters (besides the ones in acrostic) spell :

I , F.B., SON ALTESSE TUDOR

"Son Altesse" is a French Honor Title meaning "His Highness" used for a ... PRINCE !

FRANCIS BACON, HIS HIGHNESS, PRINCE TUDOR.

1967035623_2023-03-11(4).png.1963863c1cf846740c05cb193c43d3a5.png

The following one is very interesting ...

439979717_2023-03-11(5).png.44dc4f1d83e2382b5e55b19e7ba54c30.png

Indeed, Typhon is mentionned by Francis Bacon in his Book "The Wisdom of the Ancients" chapter II.

This is the very first page of his Book that mentionned the birth of Pallas, the Spear-Shaker, Francis Bacon's Muse.

2057047738_2023-03-11(6).png.4de9d23cccabed9ddbec69a50631af6e.png

Replace Juno/Hera by Queen Elizabeth I and the Serpent by Nicholas Bacon and all is said ! 😉 

Here is something that shows you that all the messages concealed by Bacon in this passage in the First Folio were not present in the Quartos but how easy it was for Bacon to add them just by adding some capital Letters (for Son ALTESSE) and by modifying slightly the character spacing (for WILLIAM TUDOR - TYPHON)

828590467_2023-03-11(11).png.76f6efb9a7ebd46c43c6fbe526e96503.png

And finally, here is the Title page of the first Quarto of Titus Andronicus (1594) that does not mentionned "written by W. Shakespeare" but where the True Author can be found if we use the "Mediocria" technic 😉

456141744_2023-03-11(7).png.6c8c4e3e7f866448d98b3d78965feacd.png

😊

 

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

What an exciting find! Amazing vision you have!

Many thanks Rob ! 🙏❤️

By the way, I have not touched on the numerical aspect but :

There are 111 words if we count "in-law "as two words , with 111 = BACON (kay cipher)

We have twice the word "sonnes". The first one is the 33rd word and the second one the 111th word,

respectively BACON in simple and kay cipher.

AND 111 + 33 = 144 = SIR FRANCIS BACON ( simple cipher)

😊

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56 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

And you likely noticed "Thy Name, and Honorable Familie" directly across the page:

image.png.d36c056d3a65f3cf87f8d27bb97ac91e.png

Wow ,very well spotted Rob ! ❤️ And no, I did not noticed this remarkable parallel, being completely focused on the bottom right column since yesterday ! 😄 i think that you can add the "ma" of "make" ... WILL I MA KE ! 🙂 

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22 hours ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

In the first folio dedication "To The Reader" a geometric consideration leads us to a point between words 33 and 34. This could be seen as a call to go read what is here. I sense all things align that way. 

If Bacon was Shakespeare, and he left us clues about his life in ciphers, then wouldn't we expect the number 33 to be an important place to look? Of course we would as BACON is 33 Simple cipher.

Line 33 of the Sonnets following the word "mother" at the end of line 32 is:

For where is she so faire whose vn-eard wombe

image.png.3ba06f372b6814e0712ecca4aae65ead.png

If we look to Sonnet 33 we find that the first letters of the Sonnet, "FFKGAWASEWBTYS" add up to the following cipher totals:

158 Simple, 192 Reverse, 59 Short, and 340 Kaye ciphers.

Those are the exact same four cipher totals of:

ELIZABETH TUDOR

http://www.light-of-truth.com/ciphers.html

image.png.e8c1d191d12c09c879365c00c950ee6a.png

One can read Sonnet 33 as if written by Queen Elizabeth about the morning Bacon was born and it flows well:

FVll many a glorious morning haue I seene,
Flatter the mountaine tops with soueraine eie,
Kissing with golden face the meddowes greene;
Guilding pale streames with heauenly alcumy:
Anon permit the basest cloudes to ride,
With ougly rack on his celestiall face,
And from the for-lorne world his visage hide
Stealing vnseene to west with this disgrace:
Euen so my Sunne one early morne did shine,
With all triumphant splendor on my brow,
But out alack, he was but one houre mine,
The region cloude hath mask'd him from me now.
  Yet him for this, my loue no whit disdaineth,
  Suns of the world may staine, when heauens sun stainteh.

 

"Even though my Son one early morn did shine with all triumphant splendor on my brow. But alack, he was but one hour mine."

I wonder if Elizabeth did indeed write this Sonnet for Bacon. If not, then Bacon may have written it as being from her perspective. Either way we would expect that Sonnet 33 would contain Bacon's most important secret. And remember line 33 asks "For where is she so faire whose vn-eard wombe" after following the word "mother".

A "virgin mother"? Bacon's virgin mother.

22 hours ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

The reference to alchemy is most likely suggesting that the word count here is 111, which I get, but it's unclear what exactly counts for a word or not to each and every observer. To have made Sonnet 33 contain this is also a very good use of alchemical reference, as we have seen with Kunrath's use of it. It, of course, governs the overlapping of cycles in the Great Cycle that Shakespeare loves to refer to with his references to "going full circle". When the clouding is full circle that has an alchemical meaning too.

I should mention that the 11 Letter (Lines 2-12) Simple cipher of Sonnet 33 is 111.

image.png.ad29827cd472da5b0792e367b5e6841d.png

I am so thrilled that even after all these years studying this Sonnet, alchemy adds a new angle for me to explore!

FVll many a glorious morning haue I seene,
Flatter the mountaine tops with soueraine eie,
Kissing with golden face the meddowes greene;
Guilding pale streames with heauenly alcumy:

Hmmm, how does Bacon's birth to Queen Elizabeth as spoken in Sonnet 33 and Alchemy relate? There is so much I still do not know!

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23 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

If Bacon was Shakespeare, and he left us clues about his life in ciphers, then wouldn't we expect the number 33 to be an important place to look? Of course we would as BACON is 33 Simple cipher.

Line 33 of the Sonnets following the word "mother" at the end of line 32 is:

For where is she so faire whose vn-eard wombe

image.png.3ba06f372b6814e0712ecca4aae65ead.png

If we look to Sonnet 33 we find that the first letters of the Sonnet, "FFKGAWASEWBTYS" add up to the following cipher totals:

158 Simple, 192 Reverse, 59 Short, and 340 Kaye ciphers.

Those are the exact same four cipher totals of:

ELIZABETH TUDOR

http://www.light-of-truth.com/ciphers.html

image.png.e8c1d191d12c09c879365c00c950ee6a.png

One can read Sonnet 33 as if written by Queen Elizabeth about the morning Bacon was born and it flows well:

FVll many a glorious morning haue I seene,
Flatter the mountaine tops with soueraine eie,
Kissing with golden face the meddowes greene;
Guilding pale streames with heauenly alcumy:
Anon permit the basest cloudes to ride,
With ougly rack on his celestiall face,
And from the for-lorne world his visage hide
Stealing vnseene to west with this disgrace:
Euen so my Sunne one early morne did shine,
With all triumphant splendor on my brow,
But out alack, he was but one houre mine,
The region cloude hath mask'd him from me now.
  Yet him for this, my loue no whit disdaineth,
  Suns of the world may staine, when heauens sun stainteh.

 

"Even though my Son one early morn did shine with all triumphant splendor on my brow. But alack, he was but one hour mine."

I wonder if Elizabeth did indeed write this Sonnet for Bacon. If not, then Bacon may have written it as being from her perspective. Either way we would expect that Sonnet 33 would contain Bacon's most important secret. And remember line 33 asks "For where is she so faire whose vn-eard wombe" after following the word "mother".

A "virgin mother"? Bacon's virgin mother.

I should mention that the 11 Letter (Lines 2-12) Simple cipher of Sonnet 33 is 111.

image.png.ad29827cd472da5b0792e367b5e6841d.png

I am so thrilled that even after all these years studying this Sonnet, alchemy adds a new angle for me to explore!

FVll many a glorious morning haue I seene,
Flatter the mountaine tops with soueraine eie,
Kissing with golden face the meddowes greene;
Guilding pale streames with heauenly alcumy:

Hmmm, how does Bacon's birth to Queen Elizabeth as spoken in Sonnet 33 and Alchemy relate? There is so much I still do not know!

 

24 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

If Bacon was Shakespeare, and he left us clues about his life in ciphers, then wouldn't we expect the number 33 to be an important place to look? Of course we would as BACON is 33 Simple cipher.

Line 33 of the Sonnets following the word "mother" at the end of line 32 is:

For where is she so faire whose vn-eard wombe

image.png.3ba06f372b6814e0712ecca4aae65ead.png

If we look to Sonnet 33 we find that the first letters of the Sonnet, "FFKGAWASEWBTYS" add up to the following cipher totals:

158 Simple, 192 Reverse, 59 Short, and 340 Kaye ciphers.

Those are the exact same four cipher totals of:

ELIZABETH TUDOR

http://www.light-of-truth.com/ciphers.html

image.png.e8c1d191d12c09c879365c00c950ee6a.png

One can read Sonnet 33 as if written by Queen Elizabeth about the morning Bacon was born and it flows well:

FVll many a glorious morning haue I seene,
Flatter the mountaine tops with soueraine eie,
Kissing with golden face the meddowes greene;
Guilding pale streames with heauenly alcumy:
Anon permit the basest cloudes to ride,
With ougly rack on his celestiall face,
And from the for-lorne world his visage hide
Stealing vnseene to west with this disgrace:
Euen so my Sunne one early morne did shine,
With all triumphant splendor on my brow,
But out alack, he was but one houre mine,
The region cloude hath mask'd him from me now.
  Yet him for this, my loue no whit disdaineth,
  Suns of the world may staine, when heauens sun stainteh.

 

"Even though my Son one early morn did shine with all triumphant splendor on my brow. But alack, he was but one hour mine."

I wonder if Elizabeth did indeed write this Sonnet for Bacon. If not, then Bacon may have written it as being from her perspective. Either way we would expect that Sonnet 33 would contain Bacon's most important secret. And remember line 33 asks "For where is she so faire whose vn-eard wombe" after following the word "mother".

A "virgin mother"? Bacon's virgin mother.

I should mention that the 11 Letter (Lines 2-12) Simple cipher of Sonnet 33 is 111.

image.png.ad29827cd472da5b0792e367b5e6841d.png

I am so thrilled that even after all these years studying this Sonnet, alchemy adds a new angle for me to explore!

FVll many a glorious morning haue I seene,
Flatter the mountaine tops with soueraine eie,
Kissing with golden face the meddowes greene;
Guilding pale streames with heauenly alcumy:

Hmmm, how does Bacon's birth to Queen Elizabeth as spoken in Sonnet 33 and Alchemy relate? There is so much I still do not know!

Is there an app that lists all multiple word expressions that would satisfy this?

I feel that would show something that might weaken the suggestion that there is something special going on.  What if we noticed that the possibilities for using any words were so large that the satisfying of 3 additional conditions still produced many suggestions.  As far as I can tell, only useful word suggestions that are consistent with a desirable confirmation of an idea are being considered. How on earth would one guess the multi-word expression and get it right when there so many possibilities to consider?

There are what is considered to be an infinite number of word combinations of the approximately 170 000 English words. From that subset we would need to consider all those that have 14 characters.  This is still a large number. 

As a quick exercise, I find that it is not that hard to produce a two word 14 letter count. It is possible by frequency of letter usage to estimate what the average value of each letter is. If we used just a mean value for 24 letters that would be about 12.5. The skewing of vowels to lower values means that this value is less.  We can ballpark what an "average" choice would return to values around the number you have arrived to. That would seem to indicate to me that there are many potential 2 word combination of 14 words that will add up to 158. We would be looking for the subset of those which also satisfy a couple more ciphers, but each of those is also prone to returning a value around what you show by virtue of them being derived by a rule from the first. What this means is that there is a certain likelihood that a 158 in one cipher will return a certain value in another.

So, how likely is it that Elizabeth Tudor is intended even if it works? If I added a fifth cipher would it work? Why focus on these four? Is this spelled out somewhere? Who established this method of approaching the text?

For reasons you must by now understand, I don't have the statistical tools to answer these questions. Intuitively, I understand that it's not as clear cut as it seems. There are other things which we can show (which are demonstrable) that lend themselves to being considered in a way that is more tangible. Treating words empirically is complicated. Treating word combination subjectively is not going to generate unique suggestions. 

The weakest of all possible arguments will come from the interpretation of the meaning of symbols. That is magnified in a text which is bathed in many symbols. The range of what we can suggest is not small. 

What is possibly meant by Sun is not unique. If we extend that to son, which it is not, it grows larger. Is the Queen more likely to be a queen of our choosing or the moon in the context of alchemy? It really depends if we want to accept context clues from the text or not. We are free to choose our terms, and that is a problem. It can allow us to mage generalizations saying things like: such and such a play is actually veiled telling of the lives of people we suggest. Is it?

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2 hours ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

So, how likely is it that Elizabeth Tudor is intended even if it works?

Well, it is likely if Bacon was born to her and the Sonnets tell his life story. Sonnet 33 "should" be important. Of course it is not proof. There is evidence that number signatures such as the above were in use, and even by Elizabeth. below is something I wrote in another thread last April:

................................

Question: Would Elizabeth I even use a first letter signature cipher like this? Or know how? Maybe. Here is one of her poems:

Queen Elizabeth's Translation of Boethius' The Consolation of Philosophy

http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/humankind.htm

[All human kind on earth]

ALL human kind on earth
  From like beginning comes:
One father is of all,
  One only all doth guide.
He gave to sun the beams
  And horns on moon bestowed;
He men to earth did give
  And signs to heaven.
He closed in limbs our soul
  Fetched from the highest seat.
A noble seed therefore
  Brought forth all mortal folk.
What crake you of your stock
  Or forefathers old?
If your first spring and author
  God you view,
No man bastard be,
  Unless with vice the worst he feed
And leaveth so his birth.

(Wr. 1593; pub. 1899)

If we add up the first letters on the rows that are not indented, AOHHHAWINA they add up to Simple Cipher 84 the exact same as ELIZABETH. Did she sign her work with a cipher?

.........................

Her advisor/astrologer Dee seemed to use number signatures as we discussed a while back.

Line 33 looking for a virgin mother? Sonnet 33 matches a theory about the Virgin Queen giving birth to a Son who she holds one hour. BACON is 33 Simple cipher.

Yes, it may all be imagination poop. I'm sure that would have been the argument in 1609 if someone confronted Bacon with the idea and his head was on the block.

But no matter what, it may also be very true.

And then there is Day 33 in the Sonnets.

http://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#Sonnet014

The first two full Lines in Day 33 are:

But from thine eies my knowledge I deriue,
And constant stars in them I read such art

Notice one of my favorite anagram/acrostics:

But from thine eies my knowledge I deriue,
And constant stars in them I read such art

F BACON TUDOR

We can also look at the first four lines of Day 33 which contains 33 words:

But from thine eies my knowledge I deriue,
And constant stars in them I read such art
As truth and beautie shal together thriue
If from thy selfe, to store thou wouldst
conuert:

And there is more I could share.

If Bacon hid his life story in the Sonnets, would the number 33 be an important place to look?

The answer is "Yes" to the question.

Are ciphers a real thing that were in use during the Elizabeth times.

"Yes" is the answer to that question, it is a well-documented fact.

Did Bacon hide his life story in the Sonnets?

It is a theory and there is cipher evidence to back it up.

 

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I would add that Rob's great work on the Sonnets shows that Sonnet 33 is the only one of the 154 Sonnets of which the sum of the first Capital letters is 158.

http://www.light-of-truth.com/baconlesson.htm

And the fact is that they share not only the same simple cipher than "ELIZABETH TUDOR"

but also the same reverse cipher and the same Kay cipher.

For example, FRANCIS BACON = 100 and JOHN DEE = 58 so FRANCIS BACON + JOHN DEE = 158

WOW !!! We ave in acrostic of Sonnet 33 the proof that Francis and John Dee knew each other !!!😲

No, evidently not !

image.png.5bdaceedec4c0dc9a376d274173b9831.png

image.png.3d5726dce47f6c4f72f2c5baabe51208.png

Look,  If ELIZABETH TUDOR = FRANCIS BACON JOHN DEE with the simple cipher, this is not the case with the Reverse cipher nor with the Kay cipher or the short cipher.

What is VERY interesting with Rob's finding is that the sum of the capital letters shares the same value that ELIZABETH TUDOR whatever the cipher (24 alphabet).

image.png.919f2415246e92356419c630dee6f970.png

And the context is important !

Indeed, to find this in Sonnet 33 (BACON) talking about a mother and his "Sun" is for me relevant too !

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11 hours ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

Is there an app that lists all multiple word expressions that would satisfy this?

I have considered this concept, open to all.

Users are using my tool for reasons not Baconian. Other languages even.

http://www.light-of-truth.com/ciphers.html

There are better web cipher tools, but this is simple easy and has been up for 20 years or so.

If we were to allow saving results with the ability to choose categories, etc., a database of number connections would grow quickly.

The Bacon special numbers will be watered down. Words that add up to 33 will grow daily.

157 and 287, oh my! It may feel like we lost a cipher foothold. Yet what we would do is secure our foundation based on "context".

I may build this, and it will contribute to the Universal Mind. A=1, and that is just a start.

TO=33, I've been in awe for so long.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

As I was working  on my next video, incorporating my last discoveries , I realised that I had missed an important point with the mouth of the Figure.

I think that the mouth speaks !!! 😁

image.png.88ae9db2969184dca6128570a2f628ab.png

F. BACON WIT

The Princ. W. TUDOR.

😊

If B. I. stands for Ben Ionson, then is that his character from the Alchemist? NAB, in his "corner shop".

Nab is a tobacconist, and methinks I spy a few strands of toBAco close to his name.

And could that be another character from his Alchemist? his FACE?

 

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The man in the moone was not a buffoon

 

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3 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

As I was working  on my next video, incorporating my last discoveries , I realised that I had missed an important point with the mouth of the Figure.

I think that the mouth speaks !!! 😁

image.png.88ae9db2969184dca6128570a2f628ab.png

F. BACON WIT

The Princ. W. TUDOR.

😊

The Princ. W. TUDOR. I like it ha ha ha.

I could imagine Bacon being king :

Excuse the numbers:  in the name William Shakespeare only p sits below the line, this means P is unique.

P is 14th in the name, R is 17th and is unique in that it is the only one that agrees with its place in the alphabet.

Now read the name when W uses two separate vees: VVilliam Shakespeare: now P is 15th, as per alphabet.

Let R represent "Regina".

Let R also represent 'root'

What does P stand for?  P = 15; the square of 15 is 225.

225 is the number of Elizabeth Tudor Virgo  (84  74  67)

 Sonnet 15, line 4, word 5 is "secret".

Let 4 and 5 be 45

The root of 45 is 67/10 or secret over K

as in (Francis) secret King?

 

By the way     B A C O N  =  2  1  3  14  13  =  15 = 6

 

         Apologies for all the numbers.

 

 

Edited by peethagoras
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The man in the moone was not a buffoon

 

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3 hours ago, peethagoras said:

If B. I. stands for Ben Ionson, then is that his character from the Alchemist? NAB, in his "corner shop".

Nab is a tobacconist, and methinks I spy a few strands of toBAco close to his name.

And could that be another character from his Alchemist? his FACE?

 

Hi Peethagoras,

I like your idea !  I am increasingly convinced that Francis Bacon himself is the Author of this poem, however B.I. can effectively stand for Ben Jonson ( or Boaz and Iakin) , and if it is the case, indeed, the three lettre NAB right below "His face" could be a reference to NAB the "to bacco nist" in The Alchemist by Ben Jonson, a character who,in addition,  is mentionned Act 2 Scene 6  ... 26 # B.F. 

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3 hours ago, peethagoras said:

The Princ. W. TUDOR. I like it ha ha ha.

I could imagine Bacon being king :

Excuse the numbers:  in the name William Shakespeare only p sits below the line, this means P is unique.

P is 14th in the name, R is 17th and is unique in that it is the only one that agrees with its place in the alphabet.

Now read the name when W uses two separate vees: VVilliam Shakespeare: now P is 15th, as per alphabet.

Let R represent "Regina".

Let R also represent 'root'

What does P stand for?  P = 15; the square of 15 is 225.

225 is the number of Elizabeth Tudor Virgo  (84  74  67)

 Sonnet 15, line 4, word 5 is "secret".

Let 4 and 5 be 45

The root of 45 is 67/10 or secret over K

as in (Francis) secret King?

 

By the way     B A C O N  =  2  1  3  14  13  =  15 = 6

 

         Apologies for all the numbers.

 

 

My apologies Peethagoras. I try to follow your thinking but it's difficult.

I think that it is a big extrapolation around just one letter of a name to make it fit with the idea that the pen name itself would conceal the fact that Bacon was the son of Queen Elizabeth.

Regarding your take on the word "secret" in Sonnet 15, I understand your technic that you already mentionned, with the use of the placement of a word in the text to find a secret meaning, but (and this is just my opinion) there is a lack of context, I mean that there is nothing in the Sonnet that you can connect to your suggestion.

To give you an example of contextualisation by using your technic : 

SONNET 15

When I consider everything that grows
Holds in perfection but a little moment,
That this huge stage presenteth nought but shows
Whereon the stars in secret influence comment;
When I perceive that men as plants increase,
Cheered and check'd even by the selfsame sky,
Vaunt in their youthful sap, at height decrease,
And wear their brave state out of memory;
Then the conceit of this inconstant stay
Sets you most rich in youth before my sight,
Where wasteful Time debateth with Decay
To change your day of youth to sullied night;
And all in war with Time for love of you,
As he takes from you, I engraft you new.

The Sonnet talk about TIME !

You explain that secret is the 5th word on line 4 , and you suggest the importance of the number 45.

The fact is that the numbers 45 and 15 (we are in Sonnet 15) are connected by ... the Magic square of Saturn !

Square of Saturn - definition of Square of Saturn by The Free Dictionary  

That is a 3 by 3 square and the numbers of each line and each column add to 15 for a total of 45.

And Saturn/Cronos is linked to TIME ...

https://houghtonlib.tumblr.com/post/159190088286/tempore-patet-occulta-veritas-is-a-latin-motto

I do not say that this is the answer, just an example.

Regards.

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7 minutes ago, Allisnum2er said:

My apologies Peethagoras. I try to follow your thinking but it's difficult.

I think that it is a big extrapolation around just one letter of a name to make it fit with the idea that the pen name itself would conceal the fact that Bacon was the son of Queen Elizabeth.

Regarding your take on the word "secret" in Sonnet 15, I understand your technic that you already mentionned, with the use of the placement of a word in the text to find a secret meaning, but (and this is just my opinion) there is a lack of context, I mean that there is nothing in the Sonnet that you can connect to your suggestion.

To give you an example of contextualisation by using your technic : 

SONNET 15

When I consider everything that grows
Holds in perfection but a little moment,
That this huge stage presenteth nought but shows
Whereon the stars in secret influence comment;
When I perceive that men as plants increase,
Cheered and check'd even by the selfsame sky,
Vaunt in their youthful sap, at height decrease,
And wear their brave state out of memory;
Then the conceit of this inconstant stay
Sets you most rich in youth before my sight,
Where wasteful Time debateth with Decay
To change your day of youth to sullied night;
And all in war with Time for love of you,
As he takes from you, I engraft you new.

The Sonnet talk about TIME !

You explain that secret is the 5th word on line 4 , and you suggest the importance of the number 45.

The fact is that the numbers 45 and 15 (we are in Sonnet 15) are connected by ... the Magic square of Saturn !

Square of Saturn - definition of Square of Saturn by The Free Dictionary  

That is a 3 by 3 square and the numbers of each line and each column add to 15 for a total of 45.

And Saturn/Cronos is linked to TIME ...

https://houghtonlib.tumblr.com/post/159190088286/tempore-patet-occulta-veritas-is-a-latin-motto

I do not say that this is the answer, just an example.

Regards.

You said "it is a big extrapolation around just one letter of a name to make it fit with the idea that the pen name itself would conceal the fact that Bacon was the son of Queen Elizabeth." and I can see why you would say that, but from my perspective, the name itself was the important thing to those who where behind it all (IMO). Where is there another name with those properties? When W is one symbol P is 14th, but when W is two symbols, P is 15th, it's correct abc value.

I think the idea came from Saint Peter at the gates, where Rhoda sees him and runs into the house. Peter is represented by P and Rhoda by R: the 17th in the name and the alphabet. Depending on whether the first symbol is W or VV, makes either Peter or Rhoda the valid subject.  P R.  15 or 17.

By the way P is also Greek rho, and there's only one rose in the new testament: Greek Rhoda.

But overall, although your's may not be the answer, I think it makes a more sense than mine. I often just work stuff out and sometimes an idea tickles me such that I feel the urge to share with someone.  There's loads of stuff like that, but without feedback it somehow makes little sense in continuing. But I'm sure you know that when the bug bites it's hard not to scratch.

Thanks for that feedback, I appreciate it.

As for that link:

image.jpg.30e5b9e3a6470238f3032c0fbb1c9701.jpg

I wonder if you might care to remark on the hands: the woman shows how many digits? 

Exactly where is she being held by Time?

(Notice the way her fingers are positioned: this is seen on many occasions in various portraits. English, Italian, Dutch... )

 

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The man in the moone was not a buffoon

 

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Good Evening Wonder Wizard of B'Hve,

The complexity and intricacy of the identifications and connections are truly astonishing. You have produced a masterclass in cryptologcial and annagrammatical analysis, delivered with the coherency that only a master of his subject can, with such sublime panache and modesty which pays fulsome tribute to your unique character & personality. Bravo! Bravo! Bravo!♥️👍😍

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