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Francis Bacon's Private Notebook The Promus - Source for Hundreds of Parallels in his Shakespeare Works


A Phoenix

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4 hours ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

She was born into it.

Lucky for us!!

She had a remarkable background and life it sounds.

4 hours ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

Her life appears to have been about trying to confirm held beliefs. This I would argue is not the same thing as studying something and making discoveries in a field. Everyone should be aware of this deeply rooted bias. When you seek to confirm things which you already accept the exercise is prone to succeeding.

I understand what you are saying, and also know you promote a fascinating concept about NS. Potts was very important to Bacon and his dreams. That she was "born into it" does not make it less important. Maybe we can be more critical. Her hypothesis was handed to her from centuries of tradition and oral secrets, and we all might agree she knew what she was looking for and she found it.  By the time she was learning how to say "Momma" she was likely hearing talk of Bacon. Perfect.

Before I was a Baconian, in the late 80's and to the mid 90's, my favorite past time, next to Grateful Shows, was being alone in the wilderness seeking arrowheads. I was doing exactly what I do today. But now it is Shakespeare and other Elizabethan works instead of open meadows in the mountains or deserts where I seek treasures. In both cases I have never doubted what I was looking for. And the thrill of making a discovery is so much more than anything else I can imagine.

CJ, there were no numbers before Bacon with me, nothing to ever be analyzed by another. Just free mind seeking arrowheads on happy days. In the sun, losing my internal English word dialog while I walked around listening to nature in a daze.

"If I were a prehistoric hunter, father, family and tribe member, what would I do and where would I be?"

I have found arrowheads where they hunted, often broken from use or wear. Then a few were beautiful, like decorative, artwork. They would be where I imagined they lived and hung out. Even a decade of wandering around the wilderness thinking I was in ancient shoes, I knew too close to the streams and mosquitos are annoying. South-faced slopes were for the Winter and Spring, the shady cooler North-faced slopes Summer and very early Fall.

I knew what I was looking for, and knew I would find it, and I usually did. Same with Bacon's thinly placed treasures.

A few memorable moments in those times when I would reach down and pick up a prehistoric tool or piece of art. For me it was always a spiritual instance. Touching something where thousands of years may have past since the last human touched it. And I would send back a thought.

Somebody had an idea, "The earth is round." And they looked for anything that would validate them. And there was abundance. They proved it. Everyone thought they were nuts, or evil. But everywhere they looked they found more evidence, coincidences, what seemed random connections that reinforced what they believed, or even knew.

Constance Mary Pott was born to be who she was, in my opinion. You demonstrated very well. She was indeed biased, that was her destiny. That can be a handicap, or a gift. Her destiny was a gift for us. She is why we are having this discussion right now.

If it were not for her upbringing, that Bacon was Shakespeare may not be known. Now some may laugh at us believing we are worshiping a house of cards that Bacon wrote Shakespeare, but to be honest, the evidence is no weak house of cards, the entire Stratfordian house of cards is already Shaking and Will fall. 

In your defense, CJ, I do accept I get carried away, over enthusiastic, I can see Bacon's message anywhere. And most of the time I actually believe what I see is Bacon's message which is a thrill all its own. And it very well may be true. Well, some of it, maybe...

Who knows. All we can do is test and measure. Like Bacon taught us.

Seeking is a Key, more than finding possibly.

 

 

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Bias or conflict of interest is just one factor to take into consideration in considering what is true or not.  "Confirmation bias" is a problem for all researchers who set out to prove something deductively (a hypothesis) instead of working inductively as Bacon proposed.

Spedding treated the Promus dismissively as editor of the Works of Francis Bacon.  I think his treatment of Bacon overall was informed by a desire not to reveal Bacon's secrets, as his biographer.  Perhaps pressure was put on him by those in government who did not wish for Bacon's secrets to be revealed, as well.

Objectivity is the goal, but readers must read critically and compensate for subjective bias, realizing it almost always exists.

To virtually  ignore the work of Constance Potts and Edwin Durning-Lawrence on the Promus, as the editors of the Oxford Francis Bacon vol. 1 did, because they were Baconians means they excluded a lot of findings from their own further analysis. It certainly made their task easier. Some of Mrs. Potts' or Durning-Lawrence's findings won't stand up to  scrutiny. For that matter, some of Stewart and Knight's findings could be challenged. Always you can dig deeper and not be content with easy answers. There is a lot of work to be done; but as always, if Baconians won't do it, it seems no one else will have the incentive to do it. We probably can't do it all in this generation. But we have to build upon a solid foundation of facts.

Those who refuse to consider evidence found by "Baconians" (and how are we defining that? People who study the work of Francis Bacon? That was what it used to mean. Now it seems to mean people investigating Bacon's contribution to Shakespeare, but that does not include every Baconian endeavor.) are going to be missing important findings. People who refuse to even look for Francis Bacon when researching the early modern period are going to be missing important findings, because he worked behind the scenes a lot. The whole historical record is skewed by people refusing to look for evidence of Francis Bacon for fear of what they might find. God forbid that Shakespeare might turn out to be Francis Bacon! Of course, he did not do it all himself, but to exclude him from consideration when there are such good reasons to include him, now that collaboration is acknowledged, doesn't make sense.

The classically-educated Edwin Reed translated a portion of Bacon's Cogitata et Visa; it was published in Reed's Francis Bacon: Our Shakespeare  (Boston, 1902). See pp. 126-130. It should be mentioned and compared along with other translations such as Benjamin Farrington's. https://archive.org/details/francisbaconours00reed/page/222/mode/2up.

In my opinion, it is tantamount to criminal to exclude entire categories of historical evidence from consideration simply because people are afraid of what they might find if they look.

Edited by Christie Waldman
5th par, 3d line, add word "not." "That does not mean....""
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2 hours ago, Christie Waldman said:

Bias or conflict of interest is just one factor to take into consideration in considering what is true or not. 

Thank you for chiming in Christie!

CJ assumed we did not have your Baconian perspective in the B'Hive. And you Christie, I have always appreciated you helping me keep my feet on the ground, even a good while before we had a public forum to share! 

I'm hoping you stick around, CJ. You have a lot to offer, and true to your profile, you enjoy a banter. True we are a family who spends part of our days talking about Bacon. The B'Hive is a living breathing entity growing and morphing as we go along. Opinions are always welcome. Fresh ideas are exciting, hard questions make us think. We all learn, share, and enjoy a common ground no matter where we are in the road.

Bias is a word that covers a lot of ground. I have bias, and you have some.

So what else about Constance Pott? I never had a clue she was so connected! Wow!!

Makes me wonder if she was starting with a Secret she knew from a serious source, and she had to tell it without giving up the Secret. As if that were her role to fulfill.

Oooops, another hypothesis I'd have to work on. I have too many as it is. (Funny I spent maybe 15 or 20 minutes this morning reading definitions and essays on "hypothesis" and it all comes back to Bacon science.)

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12 hours ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

She was born into it. Her name is from the Latin motto Virtute et Constantia which is associated with the Knights of Malta. Constance was one of the virtues represented by the compass and square. He brother was named Francis. Her grandfather was the greatest architect and developer in Georgian England (James Haliburton, shortened to Burton). He was an Inigo Jones figure for that time. The entire family was well versed in the esoteric. James Burton is buried in a pyramid shaped tomb in England. His son was the well known Egyptologist James Burton. There's a reason why Constance was such a precocious pursuer of the ideas she had. She had been groomed to have them from early days. Her life appears to have been about trying to confirm held beliefs. This I would argue is not the same thing as studying something and making discoveries in a field. Everyone should be aware of this deeply rooted bias. When you seek to confirm things which you already accept the exercise is prone to succeeding.

James Burton (property developer) - Wikipedia is a good read up for the entire London family. There are many literary and high society connections with this family. Studying the Burtons would be an excellent way to understand why it was that Constance came to have encountered some suggestions. Not a whole lot is known about her mother Jesse, but it is known that Thomas Chandler Haliburton stayed with the family when he visited London for an extended visit in the 1840s, just prior to his work which treats on the search for a treasure in Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia.

Hi C J. Thank you for the link to James Burton. The third //graph from the end in this article states that Constance was the granddaughter (not 'daughter' it seems) of James Burton's youngest daughter, Jesse.

Between 1947 and 1960 seven further donations were made by other family members including Miss Mabel Ayscough, the Misses Helen and Constance Pott and Mr. John Fearon, all grandchildren of Jessy Fearon [1804-1844] the youngest daughter of James Burton.

https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/5bedf9a1-b3f3-4a51-beee-9fa6cb9dd830

Your assertion that Constance had an enlightened education, which may have included theories about Sir Francis Bacon, from a very early age, may well be true, but it doesn't necessarily mean that she was biased in the sense you seem to suggest' i.e. of fabricating, consciously or unconsciously, 'proofs' that Bacon was Shakespeare.

"Her life appears to have been about trying to confirm held beliefs." 

I guess my concern is that while all opinions, or nearly all, are welcome here (as I understand it), it is helpful to either state clearly that one is expressing an opinion or to quote a reference, especially where one is making potentially controversial and possibly offensive statements. 

From my perspective, and I hope I'm wrong, you seem to have dismissed Constance Pott's life's work in two pretty blunt paragraphs. Is there anything about her contributions to Baconian studies that you can acknowledge as valuable? IMHO: Even though she came from such a brilliant family (again, thank you for explaining this), one can't therefore assume that she devoted her entire life and considerable energies to fulfilling something James Burton or anyone else may have once told her about the secret life of Francis Bacon. Granted she was obsessed and no doubt hero-worshipped Lord Bacon. One would have to be obsessed to give your life to solving "the greatest of the literary problems", which she did. 

As you must know, there's a vast literature attached to the name "Constance M Pott" which I have barely scratched the surface of in the last 10 years. In addition to her own extraordinary output, much of which I believe is stored in the Senate House Library's FBS archive, dozens if not hundreds of books have been inspired by her research. And no doubt she has many detractors still today, few of whom have read her work in detail, probably.

The charge of Bias against Mrs Pott is a healthy challenge for those of us who feel nothing but gratitude to this most industrious and deeply insightful woman. Facts speak louder than opinions.

 

 

 

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Francis Bacon Concealed Poet & Dramatist

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Promus #ShakespeareSources #ShakespeareAuthorship

For the full story about ‘Francis Bacon’s Notebook’ see:

PAPER: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

FULL VIDEO:   https://youtu.be/LTfUbKb7KqU

TRAILER: https://youtu.be/DQMzHdhXeXE

PROMUS 28.png

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William Shakspere A Literary Mask for Lord Bacon Our Secret Shakespeare

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Promus #ShakespeareSources #ShakespeareAuthorship

For the full story about ‘Francis Bacon’s Notebook’ see:

PAPER: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

FULL VIDEO:   https://youtu.be/LTfUbKb7KqU

TRAILER: https://youtu.be/DQMzHdhXeXE

PROMUS 29.png

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The Influence of the So-called Terence Dramas in the Shakespeare Plays

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Promus #ShakespeareSources #ShakespeareAuthorship

For the full story about ‘Francis Bacon’s Notebook’ see:

PAPER: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

FULL VIDEO:   https://youtu.be/LTfUbKb7KqU

TRAILER: https://youtu.be/DQMzHdhXeXE

PROMUS 30.png

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Terence in the Address to Troilus and Cressida

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Promus #ShakespeareSources #ShakespeareAuthorship

For the full story about ‘Francis Bacon’s Notebook’ see:

PAPER: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

FULL VIDEO:   https://youtu.be/LTfUbKb7KqU

TRAILER: https://youtu.be/DQMzHdhXeXE

PROMUS 31.png

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46 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

The Influence of the So-called Terence Dramas in the Shakespeare Plays

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Promus #ShakespeareSources #ShakespeareAuthorship

For the full story about ‘Francis Bacon’s Notebook’ see:

PAPER: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

FULL VIDEO:   https://youtu.be/LTfUbKb7KqU

TRAILER: https://youtu.be/DQMzHdhXeXE

PROMUS 30.png

Lovely slide, A.P.

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49 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

Terence in the Address to Troilus and Cressida

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Promus #ShakespeareSources #ShakespeareAuthorship

For the full story about ‘Francis Bacon’s Notebook’ see:

PAPER: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

FULL VIDEO:   https://youtu.be/LTfUbKb7KqU

TRAILER: https://youtu.be/DQMzHdhXeXE

PROMUS 31.png

Wonderful scholarship!

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50 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

Terence in the Address to Troilus and Cressida

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Promus #ShakespeareSources #ShakespeareAuthorship

For the full story about ‘Francis Bacon’s Notebook’ see:

PAPER: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

FULL VIDEO:   https://youtu.be/LTfUbKb7KqU

TRAILER: https://youtu.be/DQMzHdhXeXE

PROMUS 31.png

I am only half way through the Phoenixes' masterly video on The Promus. I find it to be the best way to absorb such complex information. The spoken text, with not one slip of the tongue - quite an achievement considering the difficulties of pronunciation and sustained concentrated thought - I find is an aid to comprehension. Why it's so important to view the video is because it provides additional context to the slides patiently and generously posted here in the B'Hive.

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17 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Eric,

Thank you for all your generous words and support-as always it is very much appreciated, especially coming from such a knowledgeable and discerning fellow Baconian.

Hi A. Phoenix

Isn't there an old Sufi saying: "(S)he who learns the most is the teacher." In which case, I'm definitely the student.

Edited by Eric Roberts
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Hi Eric,

I always think of our project on sirbacon.org and B'Hive as a Grand Collective Project where we are blessed to have several different minds and perspectives, toward which we all contribute to the Great Bacon Picture, and where we learn from each other on a daily basis. We few, we lucky few!  

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9 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

Hi C J. Thank you for the link to James Burton. The third //graph from the end in this article states that Constance was the granddaughter (not 'daughter' it seems) of James Burton's youngest daughter, Jesse.

Between 1947 and 1960 seven further donations were made by other family members including Miss Mabel Ayscough, the Misses Helen and Constance Pott and Mr. John Fearon, all grandchildren of Jessy Fearon [1804-1844] the youngest daughter of James Burton.

https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/5bedf9a1-b3f3-4a51-beee-9fa6cb9dd830

Your assertion that Constance had an enlightened education, which may have included theories about Sir Francis Bacon, from a very early age, may well be true, but it doesn't necessarily mean that she was biased in the sense you seem to suggest' i.e. of fabricating, consciously or unconsciously, 'proofs' that Bacon was Shakespeare.

"Her life appears to have been about trying to confirm held beliefs." 

I guess my concern is that while all opinions, or nearly all, are welcome here (as I understand it), it is helpful to either state clearly that one is expressing an opinion or to quote a reference, especially where one is making potentially controversial and possibly offensive statements. 

From my perspective, and I hope I'm wrong, you seem to have dismissed Constance Pott's life's work in two pretty blunt paragraphs. Is there anything about her contributions to Baconian studies that you can acknowledge as valuable? IMHO: Even though she came from such a brilliant family (again, thank you for explaining this), one can't therefore assume that she devoted her entire life and considerable energies to fulfilling something James Burton or anyone else may have once told her about the secret life of Francis Bacon. Granted she was obsessed and no doubt hero-worshipped Lord Bacon. One would have to be obsessed to give your life to solving "the greatest of the literary problems", which she did. 

As you must know, there's a vast literature attached to the name "Constance M Pott" which I have barely scratched the surface of in the last 10 years. In addition to her own extraordinary output, much of which I believe is stored in the Senate House Library's FBS archive, dozens if not hundreds of books have been inspired by her research. And no doubt she has many detractors still today, few of whom have read her work in detail, probably.

The charge of Bias against Mrs Pott is a healthy challenge for those of us who feel nothing but gratitude to this most industrious and deeply insightful woman. Facts speak louder than opinions.

 

 

 

Facts are things which can be used to produce bad syllogism.  In fact, bad syllogism is the use of two factual statements to produce a conclusion that is not appropriate. If it was using a dishonest statement then it would simply be a lie. I do not think Constance was out to promote a lie. If her life's work boils down to the equivalent of what we see from those who quote from the Bible and infer all sorts of things about the past from their explorations in it then that ought to be understood. She was clearly groomed by Bacon enthusiasts.

We are always dealing in facts. Words and symbols on paper are factual things. What we make of them is not strengthened by their nature as facts. "Constance was honest and laborious" tells us nothing about her ability to deal with the facts. The zealot who is quoting from the Bible and producing conclusion about the world from it is honest and laborious. He cannot fail at what he is doing. 

I do not feel this is a discussion that can be had without involving the ancient idea of casting spells. Every idea that is out there in the world is operating on us. Some of these ideas are so potently crafted that they can induce unconditional acceptance (which is magic) in others. I have a deep aversion to magic, but I understand it exits in that sense. We can come to accept just about anything unconditionally. I will do well to go to my grave believing in nothing and knowing that we have been working only to deduce things which we cannot know. 

I find it odd that Constance never suggested that Shakespeare was written by God. This would seem to be what Bacon was implying about the natural world. It can't possibly have been Bacon doing the writing if Bacon truly was operating out of the Platonic tradition.  The whole thing reminds me of when Bob Dylan was once asked how he could have come to write the songs he did. He said that he had no clue and that he did not think he was responsible for it.  Would it surprise you at all if Bacon would tell you to go ahead and accept that Shakespeare was written by Shakespeare. It's what was written that matters isn't? It is all regurgitating themes from the Greeks and other sources. Who could possibly claim it was his own work, and why are people so obsessed with it? It's a lot about he cult of personalities I fear.

 

 

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35 minutes ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

It's what was written that matters isn't?

For me, on a personal level, it is about Truth. There is a wealth of evidence Bacon wrote Shakespeare, and little to none that Willy wrote the works. For most people I know, it does not matter who wrote Shakespeare. It is important to me, I'm the oddball.

 

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1 hour ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

Facts are things which can be used to produce bad syllogism.  In fact, bad syllogism is the use of two factual statements to produce a conclusion that is not appropriate.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syllogism

In the 17th century, Francis Bacon emphasized that experimental verification of axioms must be carried out rigorously, and cannot take syllogism itself as the best way to draw conclusions in nature.[9] Bacon proposed a more inductive approach to the observation of nature, which involves experimentation and leads to discovering and building on axioms to create a more general conclusion.[9]

A bad syllogism:

Bias can lead to mistakes.

Constance was biased in her work.

Constance's work was a mistake.

😉

 

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39 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syllogism

In the 17th century, Francis Bacon emphasized that experimental verification of axioms must be carried out rigorously, and cannot take syllogism itself as the best way to draw conclusions in nature.[9] Bacon proposed a more inductive approach to the observation of nature, which involves experimentation and leads to discovering and building on axioms to create a more general conclusion.[9]

A bad syllogism:

Bias can lead to mistakes.

Constance was biased in her work.

Constance's work was a mistake.

😉

 

And written by Bacon it would have probably given something like this 😊 ...

Bias can lead to Mistakes.

As Constance was biased in her worke,

Constances Worke was a mistake.

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4 hours ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

Facts are things which can be used to produce bad syllogism.  In fact, bad syllogism is the use of two factual statements to produce a conclusion that is not appropriate. If it was using a dishonest statement then it would simply be a lie. I do not think Constance was out to promote a lie. If her life's work boils down to the equivalent of what we see from those who quote from the Bible and infer all sorts of things about the past from their explorations in it then that ought to be understood. She was clearly groomed by Bacon enthusiasts.

We are always dealing in facts. Words and symbols on paper are factual things. What we make of them is not strengthened by their nature as facts. "Constance was honest and laborious" tells us nothing about her ability to deal with the facts. The zealot who is quoting from the Bible and producing conclusion about the world from it is honest and laborious. He cannot fail at what he is doing. 

I do not feel this is a discussion that can be had without involving the ancient idea of casting spells. Every idea that is out there in the world is operating on us. Some of these ideas are so potently crafted that they can induce unconditional acceptance (which is magic) in others. I have a deep aversion to magic, but I understand it exits in that sense. We can come to accept just about anything unconditionally. I will do well to go to my grave believing in nothing and knowing that we have been working only to deduce things which we cannot know. 

I find it odd that Constance never suggested that Shakespeare was written by God. This would seem to be what Bacon was implying about the natural world. It can't possibly have been Bacon doing the writing if Bacon truly was operating out of the Platonic tradition.  The whole thing reminds me of when Bob Dylan was once asked how he could have come to write the songs he did. He said that he had no clue and that he did not think he was responsible for it.  Would it surprise you at all if Bacon would tell you to go ahead and accept that Shakespeare was written by Shakespeare. It's what was written that matters isn't? It is all regurgitating themes from the Greeks and other sources. Who could possibly claim it was his own work, and why are people so obsessed with it? It's a lot about he cult of personalities I fear.

 

 

"Constance was honest and laborious"... is this a quote from somewhere, or they your own words?

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8 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Eric,

I always think of our project on sirbacon.org and B'Hive as a Grand Collective Project where we are blessed to have several different minds and perspectives, toward which we all contribute to the Great Bacon Picture, and where we learn from each other on a daily basis. We few, we lucky few!  

Hi A. Phoenix

I heartily agree. Sound advice. This is a b'hive not a hornet's nest. I feel very privileged to be able to learn from you all.

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1 hour ago, Eric Roberts said:

Hi A. Phoenix

I heartily agree. Sound advice. This is a b'hive not a hornet's nest. I feel very privileged to be able to learn from you all.

We make Honey, so will attract hornets and bears. However, a clever hornet now and then might help us make better honey.

Keep that in mind. Pranksters might make one uncomfortable, yet we need them sometimes.

My favorite Pranksters:

http://furthurdowntheroad.org/merry-pranksters/

kesey-13.jpg.513c5e1195904bdf2dd24b1920f01541.jpg

Clumsy animals who destroy everything in their path to get to the honey are never welcome. LOL

I'm dealing with urban raccoons that wreak havoc in our backyard...but the bee's keep making honey.

Grateful Dead lyrics from Samson and Delilah:

Now Samson and the lion, they got in attack
And Samson he walked up on the lion's back
You read about this lion, he killed a man with his paw
Samson got hands up round the lion's jaw
He ripped that beast, killed it dead
And the bees made honey in the lion's head
 
If I had my way
If I had my way
If I had my way

I would tear this whole building down
Tear this whole building down!
 

The building to tear down is the Stratfordian house of cards.

A. Phoenix was 100% on target, "I always think of our project on sirbacon.org and B'Hive as a Grand Collective Project where we are blessed to have several different minds and perspectives, toward which we all contribute to the Great Bacon Picture, and where we learn from each other on a daily basis."

 

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6 hours ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

Facts are things which can be used to produce bad syllogism.

Facts are also the basis of Truth? Right?

Or not...

Two Realities: Truth and Fact (and They’re Not the Same)

From that link:

A fact is something that’s indisputable, based on empirical research and quantifiable measures. Facts go beyond theories. They’re proven through calculation and experience, or they’re something that definitively occurred in the past.

Truth is entirely different; it may include fact, but it can also include belief. Oftentimes, people will accept things as true because they fall closer to their comfort zones, are assimilated easily into their comfort zones, or reflect their preconceived notions of reality.

Fact is indisputable. Truth is acceptable.

CJ tells us facts can lead to bad syllogism, or to what might not be Truth.

I love Bacon's quote (not Shakespeare's), "What is Truth..." But even that was a quote by "jesting Pilate".

image.jpeg.42aeccfa31f19a8b9993267498cfc905.jpeg

Reading this page again for the millionth time, or so, it always affects me. These 2 and a start sentences say so much! It is in Bacon's name, he is "allowed" to speak as himself in his own works and as Bacon.

And it is about Truth, and right away he blows it apart. 🙂

For Bacon, his Truth was one of living a lie. And it shows here, he can't hide it very well. Bacon is a Prankster laughing his butt off with his very serious "Essays". His "Bacon" legacy, or one of them. Definitely the legacy for the masses. Face it, who can read his scientific works for fun. But his Essays can be read by anyone with a High School education.

And then for we who have learned to seek ciphers here is a page of easy pickings, with William Tudor I clues as well. Why would Bacon take time to leave cipher level 101 hints in a work with his name on it already?

For fun, and to teach? I get it.

But hey, we seek Bacon signatures in Shakespeare, so Bacon made sure we had a Shakespeare signature in his work.

OF TRUTH is 103 Simple cipher, the same as SHAKESPEARE. There you go.

Bad Syllogism:

Bacon left clues where we expect them in Shakespeare.

William Shakespeare left a clue in Bacon where we expect one.

Shakespeare wrote Bacon.

Of course, Bacon had to have an easy Shakespeare signature in this edition of the Essays, 1625. Or it would not be perfect. 😉

"Beleefe : Affecting Free-will in Thinking,"

Bacon, being the Clown he is, testing we Fooles, instructs us that we are very held-down by our beliefs, our Truths, yet tickles our minds to look at the silly clues he leaves around that we have learned to look for, because he taught us.

Sometimes people say to me, "Bacon's style was boring, dry, and Shakespeare's so vibrant. How could you believe Bacon wrote Shakespeare?'

I think to myself, "You don't know how to read either, or you'd see how they are from the same person." LOL

But seriously, I know in my work, my passion, my beleefes affect my free-will in thinking. CJ and Christie are accurate in telling us bias comes with risks. That doesn't mean my vision is wrong, or "of no worth", it means I need to always be aware of where my thoughts come from. I like what I believe, and plan to enjoy being here. If some kind of indisputable evidence pops up proving Shakespeare was written by someone else, I will accept.

After countless tidbits of cipher hints in the same style where I expect to find them, my bias has evolved to what the words and clues say. Now it is not as much discovery and unfolding. Bacon's story, as it is told to me by the hidden story is tragic, painful, yet exciting and fun. One clue leads to the next, and usually is fruitful.

Bacon taught us to filter our garbage and clutter, see reality based on experiments and repeated results from the same ingredients. This he states in the bright sunlight of the day. At the same time he teaches us how to peek behind the veil, to learn what is in the shadows.

My Truth, my Beleefe, my Reality.

 

 

 

 

 

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Horace's Satires Dedicated to Lady Anne Bacon

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Promus #ShakespeareSources #ShakespeareAuthorship

For the full story about ‘Francis Bacon’s Notebook’ see:

PAPER: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

FULL VIDEO:   https://youtu.be/LTfUbKb7KqU

TRAILER: https://youtu.be/DQMzHdhXeXE

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The Influence of Horace's Writings in the Shakespeare Works

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Promus #ShakespeareSources #ShakespeareAuthorship

For the full story about ‘Francis Bacon’s Notebook’ see:

PAPER: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

FULL VIDEO:   https://youtu.be/LTfUbKb7KqU

TRAILER: https://youtu.be/DQMzHdhXeXE

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Sir Nicholas Bacon's Favourite Poet & Dramatist Seneca

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Promus #ShakespeareSources #ShakespeareAuthorship

For the full story about ‘Francis Bacon’s Notebook’ see:

PAPER: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research

FULL VIDEO:   https://youtu.be/LTfUbKb7KqU

TRAILER: https://youtu.be/DQMzHdhXeXE

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