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Francis Bacon's Hamlet - A Tudor Family Tragedy


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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

Hamlet Directs the Players

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET 120.png

Delicious alliteration - "trippingly on the tongue". Using a dance metaphor for speech.

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

An Acting Masterclass

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET 121.png

In other words, keep it real. Can't you hear the brisk certainty of Bacon the director in giving instructions to his players?

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

A Mousetrap to Catch a King

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET 130.png

Hi A. Phoenix. Through your generous efforts it's as if I'm reading Hamlet for the first time. Isn't it brilliant?! Dialogue like swordplay, with young Hamlet by far the better fencer. He says just enough to deeply unsettle Claudius's conscience, covering it with careless light-heartedness: "we that have free souls, it touches us not". Whoever wrote such vivid scenes as these, I suspect that brilliant repartee was their natural, everyday mode of conversation.

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

Caught in a Ratrap

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET 131.png

"Bellow": such an unlikely, and yet ever so apt choice of words. Crows and ravens do make croaking sounds and they certainly bellow in long-distance communication with each other. Odd that a flock of ravens is known as a "murder".🙂

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

Confirmation of Guilt

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET 132.png

Perhaps an underlying reason why this scene works so well, theatrically speaking, is that only Hamlet and Horatio know what's going on. The rest of the cast are in the dark and confused. But what's so compelling is that, from the beginning the author gives the audience great insight into the internal dilemmas and emotional turmoil of Hamlet, so that when we arrive at the climax of the play the audience is fully immersed in the twisted fates of the characters as they engage in a struggle to the death.

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Hi Eric,

As soon as I think of the play Hamlet and Hamlet (Lord Bacon) my airs stand up on the back of my neck. We all know that the play is profound and philosophical but it is also overwhelmingly emotional, none more so than the scene between Hamlet (Lord Bacon) and Laertes (Essex) later in the play-it is like being in the same room with them four hundred years later. (A. Phoenix, Francis Bacon and his Earliest Shakespeare Play Hamlet A Tudor Family Tragedy, pp. 85-90).

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The Confession of Claudius

Alone, Claudius (the Earl of Leicester) confesses to the cruel murder of Old King Hamlet (Sir Nicholas Bacon) ‘O, my offence is rank! It smells to heaven./It hath the primal eldest curse upon’t,/A brother’s murder’(3:3:36-8).The evil tyrant wishes to be forgiven for ‘my foul murder’ but he does want to give up ‘those effects for which I did murder-/My crown, mine own ambition, and my queen’ (3:3:54-5). He ponders whether it be possible that he might be pardoned and retain the offence ‘In the corrupted currents of this world/Offence’s gilded hand may shove by justice,/And oft ’tis seen the wicked prize itself/Buys out the law’ (3:3:57-60), but you cannot hide your crimes and sins from the all-seeing eye of heaven.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET 136.png

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Gertrude & Hamlet

In Queen Gertrude’s chambers with her agreement Polonius conceals himself behind the curtain to eavesdrop on the conversation with Hamlet. His mother Queen Gertrude (Queen Elizabeth Tudor) tells Hamlet (Francis Tudor) that he has greatly offended his father King Claudius (Bacon’s secret biological father the Earl of Leicester) to which  Hamlet replies that it is she who has offended his real father (Sir Nicholas Bacon). Their verbal exchange becomes increasingly heated and his royal mother threatens to call the guards but Hamlet is having none of it:

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET 137.png

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Hamlet & the Death of Polonius

Frightened that Hamlet might attack her Queen Gertrude cries out ‘What will they do? Thou will not murder me?’/Help, help, ho!’ (3:4:21-2) and on hearing it from behind the arras Polonius also calls out for help. Angered at being spied on Hamlet thrusts his sword through the curtain at the concealed figure believing that he might have killed the King but on pulling back the curtain he discovers he has in fact killed Polonius.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET 139.png

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16 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

HAMLET 138.png

This caught my attention today:

You go not till I set you vp a glasse,
Where you may see the inmost part of you?

So I have a moment to look. Wow, what a Treasure, as A. Phoenix has already shared. Yet it is worthy of a closer look anyway. One of the first things I did was start to count lines, words, etc. Sometimes it can really tell a story. Not always, but sometimes.

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/doc/Ham_F1/page/19/index.html

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/778/index.html%3Fzoom=850.html

image.png.414b6e1ec992a0ae4a3af8a638b7f744.png

I see 29 words in those 4 lines. We could add the 4 characters of "Ham." to make 33. But for me, 29 has been on my mind all night last night and today. I have been looking at it whenever I can.

On 2/16/2023 at 4:25 PM, RoyalCraftiness said:

Synodic month=29.530588853 days. 12 of those are 354.367 days. I solar year is 365.242222 days. The ratio 365.2422222/354.367=1.0306889. The decimal part, 0.03068889, has to eventfully contribute 1 full cycle for the two to coincide again The reciprocal of 33 is 0.0303 (33x0.030303=1). There's a slight error of about 4 parts per ten thousand. New year would coincide with the new moon again if that was your starting reference point.

Here is Line 29 of the Sonnets, the first Line of Sonnet 3:

LOoke in thy glasse and tell the face thou vewest,

In both places Bacon is talking to his Mother, the Queen. And he is letting go of a lot of buried suppressed material. 🙂

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/778/index.html%3Fzoom=850.html

image.png.b99f57593dcd34a2eb4944e533f427c1.png

Numbers?

On that page in Hamlet, look at 32 lines:

image.png.b6f9d83fccc71b78e704d28ed36fb546.png

Line 32 ends with "You are my Mother."

In the Sonnets, Line 32 ends with the word "mother."

Line 33 of the Sonnets asks after the word "mother" at the end of Line 32:

For where is she so faire whose vn-eard wombe

Line 33 of page 270 in the First Folio in Hamlet has the Queen stating after Hamlet said, "You are my Mother" at the end of Line 32:

Nay, then Ile set those to you that can speake.

Lines 29 - 42 of the Sonnets and all of Sonnet 3 (Line 33 highlighted in teal):

LOoke in thy glasse and tell the face thou vewest,
Now is the time that face should forme an other,
Whose fresh repaire if now thou not renewest,
Thou doo'st beguile the world,vnblesse some mother.
For where is she so faire whose vn-eard wombe
Disdaines the tillage of thy husbandry?
Or who is he so fond will be the tombe,
Of his selfe loue to stop posterity?
Thou art thy mothers glasse and she in thee
Calls backe the louely Aprill of her prime,
So thou through windowes of thine age shalt see,
Dispight of wrinkles this thy goulden time.
But if thou liue remembred not to be,
Die single and thine Image dies with thee.

Same theme, two different places in Shakespeare. Same numbers, mainly 32 and 33, 29 today and may even be connected to the Lunar cycles, but for we who read numbers we can see this right now.

Bacon was writing as his Mother in Hamlet. What does "I'll set those to you that can speak" mean?

Was Bacon referring to the numbers (those that can speak)? Did Bacon set his life in cipher and in numbers that "speak"? 😉

Line 33 of the Sonnets asks where his mother is. Sonnet 33 is one place where Bacon speaks his answer:

Sonnet 33 by Elizabeth, I believe:

FVll many a glorious morning haue I seene,
Flatter the mountaine tops with soueraine eie,

Kissing with golden face the meddowes greene;
Guilding pale streames with heauenly alcumy:
Anon permit the basest cloudes to ride,
With ougly rack on his celestiall face,
And from the for-lorne world his visage hide
Stealing vnseene to west with this disgrace:
Euen so my Sunne one early morne did shine,
With all triumphant splendor on my brow,
But out alack,he was but one houre mine,
The region cloude hath mask'd him from me now.

   Yet him for this,my loue no whit disdaineth,
   Suns of the world may staine,when heauens sun stainteh.

First letters of Sonnet 33:

FFKGAWASEWBTYS adds up to 158 Simple, 192 Reverse, 59 Short, and 340 Kaye ciphers.

ELIZABETH TUDOR adds up to 158 Simple, 192 Reverse, 59 Short, and 340 Kaye ciphers.

He was but one hour hers. But oh what an hour that was! 🙂

Hamlet says out-loud:

You are the Queene...You are my Mother.

You know, I was looking at the next page in Hamlet, page 271, and talk about a rich vein of sparkling gold nuggets that want attention. Whew!

 

 

 

 

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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Queen Gertrude's Betrayal

Hamlet further expresses his disgust to Queen Gertrude (Queen Elizabeth) regarding her sexual lust and her black heart of betrayal:

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET 141.png

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