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Francis Bacon's Hamlet - A Tudor Family Tragedy


A Phoenix

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Francis Bacon and his Discussion of Ciphers in The Advancement of Learning

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

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Francis Bacon Hidden in Plain Sight on The First Page of Hamlet

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

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The Secret Royal Revelations in the Opening Passage of Hamlet


       We know after addressing the question ‘Who’s there?’, that it is Francis Bacon hidden behind the disguises and in the names of Francisco and Barnardo. Furthermore, as if having an inner conversation with himself Francisco instructs Barnardo to ‘Stand and unfold yourself’, to which Barnardo replies to Francisco ‘Long live the King!’ With the passing of his mother Queen Elizabeth the rightful King of England should be her concealed son Francis Tudor Bacon, Prince of Wales. With the kingship firmly on his mind Francisco then says to Barnardo ‘You come most carefully on your hour’, a time of passing from one prince to another, one reinforced by Barnardo who identifies the hour ‘’Tis now struck twelve’, denoting not just the passing of one day to another, but the passing of one royal dynasty to another, marking the end of the Tudor dynasty.  

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

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Sir Nicholas Bacon and the Ghost of Hamlet


In the play Francisco exits not to be seen again and says of his other self ‘Barnardo has my place’ who is joined by both Marcellus and Horatio. The death of his beloved foster father Sir Nicholas Bacon which occurred shortly before Bacon wrote the first version of Hamlet devastated him and haunted his consciousness and frames, informs and haunts the opening Act of the play. The Ghost of Hamlet’s father Old Hamlet has on two successive nights terrified the sentinels standing guard over the royal castle at Elsinore. In the dead of the night the sentinel Marcellus whispers ‘What, has this thing appeared again tonight?’(1:1:19) with the other sentinel Barnado replying ‘I have seen nothing (1:1:20). Horatio, an old friend of Prince Hamlet’s, thinks they have imagined it and refuses to believe it will appear.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

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The Deaths of Sir Nicholas Bacon and the Old Ghost did not Bode Well for the State

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET 98.png

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

The Secret Royal Revelations in the Opening Passage of Hamlet


       We know after addressing the question ‘Who’s there?’, that it is Francis Bacon hidden behind the disguises and in the names of Francisco and Barnardo. Furthermore, as if having an inner conversation with himself Francisco instructs Barnardo to ‘Stand and unfold yourself’, to which Barnardo replies to Francisco ‘Long live the King!’ With the passing of his mother Queen Elizabeth the rightful King of England should be her concealed son Francis Tudor Bacon, Prince of Wales. With the kingship firmly on his mind Francisco then says to Barnardo ‘You come most carefully on your hour’, a time of passing from one prince to another, one reinforced by Barnardo who identifies the hour ‘’Tis now struck twelve’, denoting not just the passing of one day to another, but the passing of one royal dynasty to another, marking the end of the Tudor dynasty.  

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET 96.png

If only high school English could have been half as interesting!

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

Sir Nicholas Bacon and the Ghost of Hamlet


In the play Francisco exits not to be seen again and says of his other self ‘Barnardo has my place’ who is joined by both Marcellus and Horatio. The death of his beloved foster father Sir Nicholas Bacon which occurred shortly before Bacon wrote the first version of Hamlet devastated him and haunted his consciousness and frames, informs and haunts the opening Act of the play. The Ghost of Hamlet’s father Old Hamlet has on two successive nights terrified the sentinels standing guard over the royal castle at Elsinore. In the dead of the night the sentinel Marcellus whispers ‘What, has this thing appeared again tonight?’(1:1:19) with the other sentinel Barnado replying ‘I have seen nothing (1:1:20). Horatio, an old friend of Prince Hamlet’s, thinks they have imagined it and refuses to believe it will appear.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET -97.png

 

1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

Sir Nicholas Bacon and the Ghost of Hamlet


In the play Francisco exits not to be seen again and says of his other self ‘Barnardo has my place’ who is joined by both Marcellus and Horatio. The death of his beloved foster father Sir Nicholas Bacon which occurred shortly before Bacon wrote the first version of Hamlet devastated him and haunted his consciousness and frames, informs and haunts the opening Act of the play. The Ghost of Hamlet’s father Old Hamlet has on two successive nights terrified the sentinels standing guard over the royal castle at Elsinore. In the dead of the night the sentinel Marcellus whispers ‘What, has this thing appeared again tonight?’(1:1:19) with the other sentinel Barnado replying ‘I have seen nothing (1:1:20). Horatio, an old friend of Prince Hamlet’s, thinks they have imagined it and refuses to believe it will appear.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET -97.png

Is there any play with a more dramatic and compelling opening scene?

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

The Deaths of Sir Nicholas Bacon and the Old Ghost did not Bode Well for the State

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET 98.png

According to Nicholas Rowe, Some Account of the Life of Mr. William Shakespear (1709) 

(Shakespeare's) Name is Printed, as the Custom was in those Times, amongst those of the other Players, before some old Plays, but without any particular Account of what sort of Parts he us'd to play; and tho' I have inquir'd, I could never meet with any further Account of him this way, than that the top of his Performance was the Ghost in his own Hamlet

https://www.gutenberg.org/files/16275/16275-h/16275-h.htm (page 12)

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Hi Eric,

I agree with you that the opening scene in Hamlet is arguably the most dramatic in all the Shakepeare canon compounded by the fact that the Great One so compelling stands before us for those with eyes to see, unseen by the so-called Shakespeare authorities and experts and the ordinary docile schoolmen. Looking down from their heaven Lord Bacon and his divine Rosicrucian Brotherhood must be crying with tears of laughter at these vain, blind and deluded fools. 

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11 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Eric,

I agree with you that the opening scene in Hamlet is arguably the most dramatic in all the Shakepeare canon compounded by the fact that the Great One so compelling stands before us for those with eyes to see, unseen by the so-called Shakespeare authorities and experts and the ordinary docile schoolmen. Looking down from their heaven Lord Bacon and his divine Rosicrucian Brotherhood must be crying with tears of laughter at these vain, blind and deluded fools. 

Hi A Phoenix. I love it when you stick it to the 'schoolman'. I realise now that I was 'taught' Shakespeare by 'teachers' who had barely any knowledge of the subject - routine, flaccid scholasticism.

Edited by Eric Roberts
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Hi Eric,

It is amazing how teachers of Shakespeare at every level up to and including universities around the world can turn the greatest and the most endlessly fascinating literature in all history into a some kind of chore and bore the living daylights out of even the brightest minds. 

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2 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Eric,

It is amazing how teachers of Shakespeare at every level up to and including universities around the world can turn the greatest and the most endlessly fascinating literature in all history into a some kind of chore and bore the living daylights out of even the brightest minds. 

I'd say that is an effective method to maintaining their status as "Shakespearean Scholars" by ensuring nobody becomes interested enough to actually study who Shakespeare was.

Shakespeare Expert:

"Of course Shakespeare is boring to you as you are not as smart as we who are at the very pinnacle of all scholarly pursuits. Even if you were interested, you wouldn't understand."

Bacon Expert:

"Find out how exciting Shakespeare can be when you learn about Francis Bacon! There is something for everybody and every interest!"

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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Hi Rob, 

Once the whole field of Shakespearean scholarship and teaching in universities departs from the premise of Lord Bacon's true authorship of the poems and plays, including his secret life and and all his secret writings, it will open up an unimagined vista that will engage and amaze people in every corner of the Globe in perpetuity. It will mark a true Renaissance in Baconian-Shakespearean scholarship and reveal to the whole world the true greatness of Lord Bacon and the incredible depths and beauty of his Shakespeare works.   

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The Machiavellian King Claudius

The newly installed king makes a speech to the court expressing his grief at the death of his brother Old Hamlet and announces that he has married his brother’s widow.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET 101.png

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Laertes Leaves For France
Laertes requests permission to return to his studies in France after showing his duty in attending his royal coronation. Claudius agrees on the proviso that Laertes has the permission of his father Polonius.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

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Polonius Grants Permisssion
Polonius who answers ‘He hath, my lord, wrung from me my slow leave/By labouring petition, and at last/Upon his will I sealed my hard consent’ (1:2:58-60).

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET 103.png

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