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Francis Bacon's Hamlet - A Tudor Family Tragedy


A Phoenix

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12 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

This caught my attention today:

You go not till I set you vp a glasse,
Where you may see the inmost part of you?

So I have a moment to look. Wow, what a Treasure, as A. Phoenix has already shared. Yet it is worthy of a closer look anyway. One of the first things I did was start to count lines, words, etc. Sometimes it can really tell a story. Not always, but sometimes.

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/doc/Ham_F1/page/19/index.html

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/778/index.html%3Fzoom=850.html

image.png.414b6e1ec992a0ae4a3af8a638b7f744.png

I see 29 words in those 4 lines. We could add the 4 characters of "Ham." to make 33. But for me, 29 has been on my mind all night last night and today. I have been looking at it whenever I can.

Here is Line 29 of the Sonnets, the first Line of Sonnet 3:

LOoke in thy glasse and tell the face thou vewest,

In both places Bacon is talking to his Mother, the Queen. And he is letting go of a lot of buried suppressed material. 🙂

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/778/index.html%3Fzoom=850.html

image.png.b99f57593dcd34a2eb4944e533f427c1.png

Numbers?

On that page in Hamlet, look at 32 lines:

image.png.b6f9d83fccc71b78e704d28ed36fb546.png

Line 32 ends with "You are my Mother."

In the Sonnets, Line 32 ends with the word "mother."

Line 33 of the Sonnets asks after the word "mother" at the end of Line 32:

For where is she so faire whose vn-eard wombe

Line 33 of page 270 in the First Folio in Hamlet has the Queen stating after Hamlet said, "You are my Mother" at the end of Line 32:

Nay, then Ile set those to you that can speake.

Lines 29 - 42 of the Sonnets and all of Sonnet 3 (Line 33 highlighted in teal):

LOoke in thy glasse and tell the face thou vewest,
Now is the time that face should forme an other,
Whose fresh repaire if now thou not renewest,
Thou doo'st beguile the world,vnblesse some mother.
For where is she so faire whose vn-eard wombe
Disdaines the tillage of thy husbandry?
Or who is he so fond will be the tombe,
Of his selfe loue to stop posterity?
Thou art thy mothers glasse and she in thee
Calls backe the louely Aprill of her prime,
So thou through windowes of thine age shalt see,
Dispight of wrinkles this thy goulden time.
But if thou liue remembred not to be,
Die single and thine Image dies with thee.

Same theme, two different places in Shakespeare. Same numbers, mainly 32 and 33, 29 today and may even be connected to the Lunar cycles, but for we who read numbers we can see this right now.

Bacon was writing as his Mother in Hamlet. What does "I'll set those to you that can speak" mean?

Was Bacon referring to the numbers (those that can speak)? Did Bacon set his life in cipher and in numbers that "speak"? 😉

Line 33 of the Sonnets asks where his mother is. Sonnet 33 is one place where Bacon speaks his answer:

Sonnet 33 by Elizabeth, I believe:

FVll many a glorious morning haue I seene,
Flatter the mountaine tops with soueraine eie,

Kissing with golden face the meddowes greene;
Guilding pale streames with heauenly alcumy:
Anon permit the basest cloudes to ride,
With ougly rack on his celestiall face,
And from the for-lorne world his visage hide
Stealing vnseene to west with this disgrace:
Euen so my Sunne one early morne did shine,
With all triumphant splendor on my brow,
But out alack,he was but one houre mine,
The region cloude hath mask'd him from me now.

   Yet him for this,my loue no whit disdaineth,
   Suns of the world may staine,when heauens sun stainteh.

First letters of Sonnet 33:

FFKGAWASEWBTYS adds up to 158 Simple, 192 Reverse, 59 Short, and 340 Kaye ciphers.

ELIZABETH TUDOR adds up to 158 Simple, 192 Reverse, 59 Short, and 340 Kaye ciphers.

He was but one hour hers. But oh what an hour that was! 🙂

Hamlet says out-loud:

You are the Queene...You are my Mother.

You know, I was looking at the next page in Hamlet, page 271, and talk about a rich vein of sparkling gold nuggets that want attention. Whew!

 

 

 

 

 

The glass would need to be pointed to Cassiopeia for the Queen to see a likeness of herself (The constellation of the vain sitting Queen). In Persia Cassiopeia had long been portrayed holding the crescent moon in her hand.

From Wikipedia: "She was forced to wheel around the north celestial pole on her throne, spending half of her time clinging to it so she does not fall off".

Get yourself to latitude 33N and she is completely visible in the Northern sky year round. She is circumpolar to many observers in the British isles.

Tycho Brahe's observed Nova of 1572 (the first of the famous 3 that preceded the Halley's comet occurrence of 1607) appeared at the tip of Cassiopeia on Nov. 11. It had the brightness of Venus for approximately 14 days (half the cycle of the moon) when it was visible with the naked eye. It surely must have something to say about Elizabeth to astrologers like Dee who were quick to use these events as either omens or as confirmations of fate.

In 1572, "The Parliament was called, following pressure from the Privy Council, to discuss the consequences of the Ridolfi plot, a Catholic conspiracy which had attempted to put Elizabeth's cousin, Mary Stuart (Queen of Scots), on the throne of England in her place." She did indeed cling to her throne at times.

With this we can see how it would have been possible to groom the Queen with all sorts of ideas and have them be confirmed by celestial events. It's a powerful way to control a vain woman. If you, as a monarch, function with the certainty that you are ordained to be great by God's stars then you will have the required confidence to be bold and lead the English to their manifest destiny. It is always a great story that creates the magic that forces individuals caught in those spells to act.

 

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On 2/15/2023 at 10:21 AM, A Phoenix said:

Caught in a Ratrap

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET 131.png

Hi A Phoenix,

Your work is captivating and enlightning. ❤️

The play of Hamlet takes a new whole dimension in the light of your thorough research and analysis !

In regard to the Mouse-trap , I think that the title is doubly appropriate

Indeed, if nowadays we use Cheese to catch a Rat, at that time, they used BACON ! 😊

IMG_20230218_202122.jpg.ac812809d8580c5ee6837cb9bb19c256.jpg

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(From Moral Emblems - 1860)

 

 

 

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18 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Here is Line 29 of the Sonnets, the first Line of Sonnet 3:

LOoke in thy glasse and tell the face thou vewest,

In both places Bacon is talking to his Mother, the Queen. And he is letting go of a lot of buried suppressed material. 🙂

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/778/index.html%3Fzoom=850.html

image.png.b99f57593dcd34a2eb4944e533f427c1.png

Numbers?

On that page in Hamlet, look at 32 lines:

image.png.b6f9d83fccc71b78e704d28ed36fb546.png

Line 32 ends with "You are my Mother."

In the Sonnets, Line 32 ends with the word "mother."

Hi Rob !

This is another great finding .❤️

By the way, "But would you were not so. You are my Mother" is the 33 rd line of the right column (which means the 99th line of the page) if we take in count the "blank" line right before the Enter of Queene and Polonius 😉.

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23 minutes ago, Allisnum2er said:

Hi Rob !

This is another great finding .❤️

By the way, "But would you were not so. You are my Mother" is the 33 rd line of the right column (which means the 99th line of the page) if we take in count the "blank" line right before the Enter of Queene and Polonius 😉.

I hope to explore page 271. Funny how so many clues are in the Light, but I know I am missing important messages.

   Ghost. Do not forget: this Visitation
Is but to whet thy almo
st blunted purpose.

But looke, Amazement on thy Mother sits;
O step betweene her, and her fighting Soule,
Conceit in weakest bodies, strongest workes.
 
Sonnet 103:
 
Looke in your glasse and there appeares a face,
That ouer-goes my blunt inuention quite,
 
 
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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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On 2/17/2023 at 10:39 AM, A Phoenix said:

 Bacon Reveals the True Identity of King Claudius

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET 140.png

Indeed, those are 33 interesting words ! 😊

image.png.b4cba9e6493df8f97b4f97aa6d6716f0.png

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/779/index.html%3Fzoom=850.html

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17 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

Hi Yann. Now that you have pointed out the acrostic, the repetition of "Have you eyes" makes this 'signature' seem almost too obvious! 

Sometimes I read across the page when something might hint at another level to "see."

image.png.fe6939e700e2639a2c69b3c055be3e12.png

This was your Husband.
Looke you now what followes.
Do you see nothing there?
Heere is your Husband, like a Mildew'd eare.
Nothing at all, yet all that is I see.
Blasting his wholsom breath.
Haue you eyes?
Nor did you nothing heare?

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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Here is something else that is interesting on page 270 of Hamlet ...

image.png.76a9acbb10be1d3ec0b4acc92fdcc7ef.png

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/778/index.html%3Fzoom=850.html

These are the 33rd lines of each column.

(33=BACON)

There are 74 characters in total.

74 = WILLIAM = TUDOR

"My Crowne, mine owne Ambition,and my Queene ... my Mother."

M+C+A+Q+B+Y+M = 69 = The number of letters.

M.B.

 

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The Conspiracy

The letters are delivered by messenger announcing Hamlet’s arrival back in Denmark and asking to see Claudius the next day to explain his ‘strange’ return. The King and Laertes conspire with each other to murder Hamlet in such a way as to make it look like an accident. Claudius works Laertes asking him if he is really fixed on revenge would he undertake ‘To show yourself your father’s son in deed/More than in words?’ to which the easily led Laertes says he would ‘cut his throat i’th’ church’ (4:7:98-9).    For the murderous poisoner Claudius ‘Revenge should have no bounds’ (4:7:101) and rest assured Laertes will have his revenge. With murderous intent King Claudius and Laertes conspire to arrange a fencing match between Laertes and Hamlet in which Laertes will use a sword anointed with deadly poison which is ‘so mortal’ there is nothing on earth that will save Hamlet from death.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET 153.png

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The Unravelling

In the midst of it Gertrude appears with the news Ophelia has drowned herself and Laertes collapses into tears earmarking the series of revenge and deaths that unfold in the final Act.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux #Robert Greene  #Thomas Nashe #Nicholas Bacon #ciphers #cryptography

HAMLET 154.png

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