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Francis Bacon's Hamlet - A Tudor Family Tragedy


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Francis Bacon's Hamlet - A Tudor Family Tragedy

 

The Tragedy of Hamlet shadows the most explosive and sensational secrets of the Elizabethan reign in which the not so Virgin Queen Elizabeth was secretly married to Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester with whom she had two concealed royal princes Francis Tudor Bacon and Robert Tudor Devereux. It tells the tale of its author a disinherited royal prince Francis Tudor Bacon in the shape of Hamlet who is denied his rightful kingship by his mother Queen Elizabeth and  the exhaustion and death of the royal Tudor dynasty.

Behind its dramatis personae lies the leading figures of the Elizabethan period: Francis Bacon Tudor concealed Prince of Wales (Prince Hamlet), Queen Elizabeth Tudor (Queen Gertrude) and her secret husband Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester (King Claudius), Robert Tudor Devereux, the second Earl of Essex (Laertes), Sir Nicholas Bacon (the Ghost of Old Hamlet) and Sir William Cecil (Polonius).

It is a story of a lustful Queen Elizabeth and the notorious poisoner and murderer Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester and the strange death possibly through poisoning by Leicester of Sir Nicholas Bacon.  It is a play that is all about revenge, murder and death, with poisonings of Old Hamlet, King Claudius, Queen Gertrude, Laertes and Hamlet himself, and by other means, the deaths of Polonius, Ophelia, and the two state spies, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.

Interspersed throughout the whole of the dissertation of the telling of this royal Tudor tragedy are lines, sentences and passages identical in thought and similar in expression, providing resemblances, correspondences and parallels from more than thirty of Bacon’s writings and works, among them: unpublished manuscripts, private letters and speeches; various essays including Of Revenge and Of Death, the two central themes of the play; as well as An Inquiry Concerning the Ways of Death and The History of Life and Death; short occasional pieces Physiological Remains and Short Notes for Civil Conversation; political works A Brief Discourse Touching the Happy Union of the Kingdom of England and Scotland and The Case of the Post-Nati of Scotland as well as the state sanctioned A Declaration of the Practices and Treasons of the Earl of Essex; his major philosophical and scientific treatises The Advancement of Learning, The Wisdom of the Ancients, Novum Organum, De Augmentis Scientiarum and Sylva Sylvarum; and several of his obscure or relatively unknown and unread legal treatises A Discourse upon the Commission of Bridewell, The Argument in Lowes Case of Tenures, The Charge of Owen Indicted for High Treason, The Reading Upon the Statues of Uses, The Maxims of the Common Law and The Ordinances made by Lord Chancellor Bacon in Chancery.

This and other evidence emphatically demonstrates beyond any reasonable doubt Francis Bacon’s authorship of the earliest and greatest Shakespeare Tudor Tragedy in the history of world literature.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux 

  

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Francis Bacon's Hamlet - The Greatest Tragedy in the History of World  Literature

The Tragical History of Hamlet Prince of Denmark is the most problematic of all the Shakespeare plays and problems and questions still continue to vex orthodox editors, scholars and critics more than four centuries after its publication. Its central character the royal prince Hamlet is universally regarded as the most complex character in all world literature. The whole essence of his being completely engages and absorbs us-emotionally, psychologically and intellectually. The full gamut of human complexity resides within him. His vast philosophical mind provides him with a deep knowledge and understanding of the human condition. His troubled soul is filled with passion and contradictions as he explores the profound depth of his grief. He is possessed with the ability to turn his searching mind inwards to look within himself and outward at the nature of humankind, its virtues and defects, and its goodness and evil. An acceptance of life is the central theme in a play which is an all-encompassing meditation upon life and death. When we are able to comprehend Hamlet, we will be in a better position to understand ourselves, and when we are fully able to comprehend the play Hamlet, we will better able to understand the elusive mysteries of the human condition and human existence, as well as the elusive secrets and mysteries of human life and death.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux 

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The Tragedy of Hamlet Reveals the Most Explosive Secrets of the Elizabethan Reign

The tragedy Hamlet Prince of Denmark shadows the most explosive and sensational secrets of the Elizabethan reign in which a not so Virgin Queen Elizabeth was secretly married to Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester with whom she had two concealed royal princes Francis Tudor Bacon and Robert Tudor Devereux. It tells the tale of its author a disinherited royal prince Francis Tudor Bacon in the shape of Hamlet who is denied his rightful kingship by his mother Queen Elizabeth and the exhaustion and death of the royal Tudor dynasty.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux 

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The Dramatis Personae

Behind its dramatis personae lies the leading figures of the Elizabethan period: Francis Bacon Tudor concealed Prince of Wales (Prince Hamlet), Queen Elizabeth Tudor (Queen Gertrude) and her secret husband Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester (King Claudius), Robert Tudor Devereux, Earl of Essex (Laertes), Sir Nicholas Bacon (the Ghost of Old Hamlet) and Sir William Cecil (Polonius).

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux 

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

Francis Bacon's Hamlet - A Tudor Family Tragedy

 

The Tragedy of Hamlet shadows the most explosive and sensational secrets of the Elizabethan reign in which the not so Virgin Queen Elizabeth was secretly married to Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester with whom she had two concealed royal princes Francis Tudor Bacon and Robert Tudor Devereux. It tells the tale of its author a disinherited royal prince Francis Tudor Bacon in the shape of Hamlet who is denied his rightful kingship by his mother Queen Elizabeth and  the exhaustion and death of the royal Tudor dynasty.

Behind its dramatis personae lies the leading figures of the Elizabethan period: Francis Bacon Tudor concealed Prince of Wales (Prince Hamlet), Queen Elizabeth Tudor (Queen Gertrude) and her secret husband Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester (King Claudius), Robert Tudor Devereux, the second Earl of Essex (Laertes), Sir Nicholas Bacon (the Ghost of Old Hamlet) and Sir William Cecil (Polonius).

It is a story of a lustful Queen Elizabeth and the notorious poisoner and murderer Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester and the strange death possibly through poisoning by Leicester of Sir Nicholas Bacon.  It is a play that is all about revenge, murder and death, with poisonings of Old Hamlet, King Claudius, Queen Gertrude, Laertes and Hamlet himself, and by other means, the deaths of Polonius, Ophelia, and the two state spies, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.

Interspersed throughout the whole of the dissertation of the telling of this royal Tudor tragedy are lines, sentences and passages identical in thought and similar in expression, providing resemblances, correspondences and parallels from more than thirty of Bacon’s writings and works, among them: unpublished manuscripts, private letters and speeches; various essays including Of Revenge and Of Death, the two central themes of the play; as well as An Inquiry Concerning the Ways of Death and The History of Life and Death; short occasional pieces Physiological Remains and Short Notes for Civil Conversation; political works A Brief Discourse Touching the Happy Union of the Kingdom of England and Scotland and The Case of the Post-Nati of Scotland as well as the state sanctioned A Declaration of the Practices and Treasons of the Earl of Essex; his major philosophical and scientific treatises The Advancement of Learning, The Wisdom of the Ancients, Novum Organum, De Augmentis Scientiarum and Sylva Sylvarum; and several of his obscure or relatively unknown and unread legal treatises A Discourse upon the Commission of Bridewell, The Argument in Lowes Case of Tenures, The Charge of Owen Indicted for High Treason, The Reading Upon the Statues of Uses, The Maxims of the Common Law and The Ordinances made by Lord Chancellor Bacon in Chancery.

This and other evidence emphatically demonstrates beyond any reasonable doubt Francis Bacon’s authorship of the earliest and greatest Shakespeare Tudor Tragedy in the history of world literature.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux 

  

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Hi A Phoenix,

Discovering your new topic my first thought was ... "My god, they never take a rest !!! 😊" and my second thought was " For our greatest delight ! ❤️".

I am looking forward to discovering your new series that will be for sure as captivating, enriching and illuminating than the previous ones.

A huge THANK YOU to one and all ,The Phoenixes, for all your great Works !❤️

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Let's start at the beginning and see the play is "Sealed".

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First notice the play begins on page 152 which is the Kaye cipher of WILLIAM. Then the first spoken word of the play starts with a  big W with "WHo's there" and the initial WT.

THE TRAGEDIE OF
HAMLET,Prince of Denmarke.

THE TRAGEDIE begins with two Ts. TT being the initials and possible clue for Thirty Three (33 is the Simple cipher of BACON) , also the Twin Towers or Two Pillars that we set forth beyond to begin our adventure.

THE TRAGEDIE is 102 Simple cipher using the 26 letter codes.

http://www.light-of-truth.com/ciphers.html

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ONE HUNDRED TWO is 157 Simple, 168 Reverse, 58 Short, and 287 Kaye ciphers using the Baconian 24 letter codes the exact same as WILLIAM TUDOR I. So yes we have a Seal already!

THE TRAGEDIE OF HAMLET is 182 Simple cipher using the 26 letter codes.

ONE EIGHTY TWO is 157 Simple, 58 Short, and 287 Kaye ciphers the same as WILLIAM TUDOR I.

PRINCE OF DENMARKE is 157 Simple and 365 Kaye ciphers using the 26 letter codes which is the same as ONE EIGHTY THREE which follows 182. Remember 183 is the middle day of the year with 182 days before and 182 days after. I consider these three days as hinting at Three Pillars and the peak of a year pyramid.

The way I see it, Bacon "signed, sealed, and delivered" this play to be quite powerful. 😉

THE TRAGEDIE OF HAMLET, PRINCE OF DENMARKE is 177 Short cipher using the 26 letter codes.

177 is the Simple cipher of WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE and TUDOR SHAKESPEARE. But also FRANCIS BACON MINERVA:

 

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
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Sex & Death in the Royal Tudor Tragedy

It is a story of a lustful and promiscuous Queen Elizabeth and the notorious poisoner and murderer Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester and the strange death possibly through poisoning by Leicester of Sir Nicholas Bacon. In a play all about revenge, murder and death through poisoning of the Old Hamlet, King Claudius, Queen Gertrude, Laertes and Hamlet himself and by other means the deaths of Polonius, Ophelia, and the two state spies Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux 

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The Secret Concealed Date of the Writing of Hamlet

The first issue we are faced with is when precisely was Hamlet written a problematic question which has also eluded Shakespeare editors, scholars and commentators for more than four hundred years, one that has given rise to seemingly endless debate and discussion, with virtually all orthodox scholars now currently of the view that it is not likely to ever be satisfactorily resolved.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux 

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The First Quarto Editions of Hamlet

The drama was first entered on the Stationers’ Register on 26 July 1602 as ‘A booke called the Revenge of Hamlett Prince Denmarke as yt was latelie Acted by the Lord Chamberleyne his servants.’ The first quarto edition of the play appeared in 1603 entitled The Tragicall Historie of Hamlet Prince of Denmarke By William Shake-speare. As it hath beene diuerse times acted by his Highnesse seruants in the Cittie of London: as also in the two Vniuersities of Cambridge and Oxford, and else-where with a text of around 2,200 lines. A second quarto followed shortly after in 1604 with a different title pages as The Tragicall Historie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke. By William Shakespeare. Newly imprinted and enlarged to almost as much againe as it was, according to the true and perfect Coppie, containing approximately 3,800 lines.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux 

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46 minutes ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

I'm not sure I truly follow. I had to go to the Folger Shakespeare Library website and read the synopsis of the play to refresh my memory.

Here is some good background information:

https://sirbacon.org/francis-bacon-and-his-earliest-shakespeare-play-hamlet-a-tudor-family-tragedy/

 

 

 

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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14 hours ago, RoyalCraftiness said:

I'm not sure I truly follow. I had to go to the Folger Shakespeare Library website and read the synopsis of the play to refresh my memory.  It doesn't map that well to the known history of the people mentioned. Gertrude married a King, Elizabeth was born into her position (and may not even have been entitled to her position). Robert Dudley was suspected of being a murderer of his young wife (by pushing her down stairs), an act he is said to have committed in order to possibly allow for the marriage to Elizabeth who was forced (probably by Cecil's urging) to not go through with it because of public outcry. In an act of cunning she declared herself to be Married to England. Bacon was never plotting to kill anyone, was he? Of killing Dudley? Elizabeth may have strongly suspected Francis was knowledgeable about a plot to kill her, but he was forced to act against others involved to prove his loyalty. This was a reprieve for Bacon who was essentially neutered afterwards. The real story is a sad tale of a weak man being dominated by a strong woman. Was Nicholas Bacon murdered? Do all these people end up dead in acts of vengeance?  Are we possibly dealing with a story that is more based on the real lives of a previous royal family who were Kings of England based out of Denmark (and who saw England like more of a hamlet, in reference to their seat at London, rather than a country), say just before the Norman conquest in the 10th-11th century? There's a clear tragic break in the lineage there too, and that story involves a prince of Denmark and his tumultuous relationship with his father. Anyway, unclear to me what is motivating the author. It could be many conflicting feelings seen through the lens of a parallel British history.

The story of Hamlet has known appeal to modern Rosicrucians. Gene Roddenberry, who is said to have been a member, wrote it into Star Trek TOS in the episode "The Conscience of the King" where the plot of the play which is enacted serves also as the plot guiding the episode. It's episode #13 in the original series. 13 here is evocative of a fourth of the deck of cards, suggesting to us a family (or suite from the French for a series) or lineage. There are many instances of quotes from Hamlet throughout this series and the following ones. No other Shakespearean play is treated to the same reverence. The title of the movie Star Trek, "The Undiscovered Country" is taken from a line in Hamlet. This is reference to travelling beyond death, a great Rosicrucian theme. Jean Luc Picard often quoted from Hamlet, and so did the android Data. I noticed a mention that the date of one of the renderings of the plays in the future was supposed to be related to the page numbering in the First Folio. 2(153) was used. I believe the First Folio has Hamlet starting at page 152. I don't know if there are any missing page numbers up to 152 in the first folio. 153 is of course a very famous "perfect number" which is used in the Bible, for example, to that effect.

There's certainly no denying that Bacon could be thought of as an off-cut of the ham. I have honestly always thought it as a pejorative towards the fledgling Saxon England kingdom which was the lower part of the island under Northumbria. When controled by the Danes it was just a small outpost for a much larger Kingdom. Back when England was but a hamlet Danes were plotting for power.

Hi R.C. It's good to have your take on Hamlet. As you are relatively new here I'd just like to alert you to the fact that the Phoenixes' study themes tend to unfold three at a time each day sometimes over many weeks. As you may be aware, their original research on which these 'slides' are based has already been published online: https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/  I noticed that Light-of-Truth provided a link to the paper on "Hamlet" which is handy, because the source text is so information-rich and fully referenced. These slides that the Phoenixes kindly post here in the B'Hive and elsewhere are a distillation of an astonishing amount of research and contemplation. It's fine to respond anyway you see fit. This is just a heads-up to say there's much more to come regarding one of Bacon's most psychologically insightful plays. Looking forward to reading more of your contributions.

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The Methodology for Revealing the Full Picture

These are the simple undisputed bibliographical facts but to determine when the play was actually written it is necessary to work chronologically backwards. Not just some of the way, providing only part of the picture, the fraudulent modus operandi of orthodox scholarship, but all the way providing the reader with all the evidence and information, to enable them to see the full picture, which Stratfordian scholarship has been concealing from the rest of the world to the present day.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux 

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The Orthodox Dating of Hamlet

The date modern editors of Hamlet have generally settled upon for the date the play was written is around 1600. This is the date given in The Oxford Shakespeare The Complete Works (2005) by its editors by Professor Stanley Wells, Honorary President of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust seen as the foremost living expert on Shakespeare and Professor Gary Taylor, Fellow of the Folger Shakespeare Library ‘It is our belief that Shakespeare wrote Hamlet about 1600’. It was a view shared by Professor Bate, a Fellow of the British Academy and the Royal Society of Literature knighted in 2015 and Professor Eric Rasmussen the editors of Royal Shakespeare Company edition of William Shakespeare Complete Works (2007), ‘DATE; 1600?’

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux 

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2 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

The Inaccurate & False Dating

The Arden editor of Hamlet Professor Harold Jenkins ‘one of the foremost Shakespeare scholars of his century’ was of the mind ‘The conclusion I am brought to concerning the date of Hamlet is that as it has come down to us it belongs to 1601’. In the Oxford edition of Hamlet (1987, 2008) Professor Hibbard hovers around the date 1600-1 and a possible date ‘of mid 1601’ is posited by Professor Philip Edwards in the Cambridge edition of the play.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Hamlet #Elizabeth #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry #RoyalBirth #RobertDudley #RobertDevereux 

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It must be arduous and thankless work, A. Phoenix, to read the writings of the bigwigs of Stratfordian scholarship assiduously and then evaluate and critique their claims. Hard slog, but it's so important to hold them to account. Bravo! Can't wait for the next instalment...

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Hi Eric,

I will endeavour to the end of my days to reveal the Truth about the Great One Lord Bacon and his authorship of the incomparable divine Shakesperare works and bring to the attention of the world the greatest man who ever lived, as well as his gifts to humankind in perpetuity. If the modern world only knew what they owed to him. In the end when the full Truth is disclosed to the rest of the world, it will truly stagger humanity.

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8 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Eric,

I will endeavour to the end of my days to reveal the Truth about the Great One Lord Bacon and his authorship of the incomparable divine Shakesperare works and bring to the attention of the world the greatest man who ever lived, as well as his gifts to humankind in perpetuity. If the modern world only knew what they owed to him. In the end when the full Truth is disclosed to the rest of the world, it will truly stagger humanity.

Hi A. Phoenix

Superbly expressed. A moving manifesto no less. It sums up why I have come to respect you so much, which is only a dull reflection of your respect for Lord Bacon. It takes a great one to recognise a Great One, and to dedicate their life to illuminating their Master's works.

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Hi Eric,

Thank you for your very kind and moving words.

We feel honoured and privileged to walk a mile or two in the company of the Grand Master Lord Bacon, 'High Priest of the World' (George Herbert) and we cannot begin to imagine what the world would look like without him. 

We also have a great respect for our fellow Baconian travellers on sirbacon.org and B'Hive; Lawrence, Rob, Yann, Kate, and yourself whose invaluable contributions makes this collective Baconian journey so much more uplifting, worthwhile and enjoyable. Long may it last!

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