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Finally: an original MASONIC/BACONIAN INSTRUMENTAL COMPOSITION on the B'hive!


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12 minutes ago, Marvin Haines said:

 

I created this with Musescore. You just write the notes and it plays them for you!! 

Are you aware that it cuts out half way through? We've been discussing AI image generation recently, the visual equivalent of the music generator you used. Sounds a bit wonky in places. Impressive though. Perhaps the tempo is a little fast. And perhaps we should not be having this chat about something which is not related to Francis Bacon...

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6 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

And perhaps we should not be having this chat about something which is not related to Francis Bacon...

"...an original MASONIC/BACONIAN INSTRUMENTAL COMPOSITION on the B'hive!" in Baconian Art and Media is good as far the B'Hive rules go.

1 minute ago, Marvin Haines said:

If you're interested, try counting the notes and musical phrases, and you might see a connection...

Hope you explain for us. I don't know if I can count the notes and phrases! LOl

I am confident you nailed it even if we all miss it! 🙂

 

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Great Job Marvin !  Beautiful composition ❤️

This morning, I just had time to like your post before work.

I like the Opening with the "3 coups" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trois_coups) and your melody. I have distinguished the 3 10 10 10 pattern hiding the Great One and the final 4 7 pattern that is revealing. I imagine that each pattern is intricated with the previous and the following one, hiding another important Baconian numbers.  Superb !

Congrats.

 

 

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image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

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22 hours ago, Marvin Haines said:

Sorry... perhaps you didn't understand. If you're interested, try counting the notes and musical phrases, and you might see a connection...

Just so this old timer can grasp what you've done here, I take it you fed numerical sequences based on Baconian ciphers into the algorithm and specified other parameters, and then hey presto! Was there much more to it than that? Perhaps you entered musical notation, not numbers? I'm sure that, if asked, you could demonstrate how you have incorporated/translated number symbolism into musical composition. I believe that Francis Bacon himself thought of using music as a means of encoding ciphers. In some ways, you have brought his idea right up to date. Again, many congrats! Since you are also a musician, have you composed any pieces in the conventional (not AI) manner based on the number equivalents of Lord Bacon's name, etc.? 

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The score is actually the overture to The Life of Arti Usher, my second attempt at a musical!

The work is based on my novel (which as Eric suggested, I've mostly rewritten). It's the story of a 16-year-old musical genius who has to solve a series of grizzly murders in the fictional city of Weameworth.

Other numbers include, "Bandsmen of Hell," "Innocent until Proven," and "O Stranger to This City." 

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A year or two, a Freemason with substance popped up and we spent some time sharing ideas. His firm suggestion to me was to learn how Bacon used music. I guess it is a Key to a holistic picture of Bacon's life and his secrets? I was, and am still, very ignorant. I played Trumpet in Jr High School and could somewhat "read" music. But I never have really understood even as a mathematician on some level as a kid.

You and Yann opened a crevice for me to peek into. Eric Roberts may be tempting me to delve in as well. R.E. Kretz was basically telling me I need to learn it.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

A year or two, a Freemason with substance popped up and we spent some time sharing ideas. His firm suggestion to me was to learn how Bacon used music. I guess it is a Key to a holistic picture of Bacon's life and his secrets? I was, and am still, very ignorant. I played Trumpet in Jr High School and could somewhat "read" music. But I never have really understood even as a mathematician on some level as a kid.

You and Yann opened a crevice for me to peek into. Eric Roberts may be tempting me to delve in as well. R.E. Kretz was basically telling me I need to learn it.

 

 

https://sirbacon.org/mmusic.htm

Was Francis Bacon a Masked Musician?  by Mather Walker, January 2003

 

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2 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

A year or two, a Freemason with substance popped up and we spent some time sharing ideas. His firm suggestion to me was to learn how Bacon used music. I guess it is a Key to a holistic picture of Bacon's life and his secrets? I was, and am still, very ignorant. I played Trumpet in Jr High School and could somewhat "read" music. But I never have really understood even as a mathematician on some level as a kid.

You and Yann opened a crevice for me to peek into. Eric Roberts may be tempting me to delve in as well. R.E. Kretz was basically telling me I need to learn it.

 

 

Hi Light-of-Truth. Great subject - Was Francis Bacon a composer/musician? I've only found this one sentence so far, which only indicates his awareness of the effects of music on the minds of his audience. I've included the context of the quote as it demonstrates Bacon's comprehensive imagination and competence as a 'director' of theatrical productions.

http://www.literaturepage.com/read/francis-bacon-essays-78.html

Sir Francis Bacon: Essays of Francis Bacon

 Of Masques and Triumphs 

THESE things are but toys, to come amongst such serious observations. But yet, since princes will have such things, it is better they should be graced with elegancy, than daubed with cost. Dancing to song, is a thing of great state and pleasure. I understand it, that the song be in quire, placed aloft, and accompanied with some broken music; and the ditty fitted to the device. Acting in song, especially in dialogues, hath an extreme good grace; I say acting, not dancing (for that is a mean and vulgar thing); and the voices of the dialogue would be strong and manly (a base and a tenor; no treble); and the ditty high and tragical; not nice or dainty. Several quires, placed one over against another, and taking the voice by catches, anthem-wise, give great pleasure. Turning dances into figure, is a childish curiosity. And generally let it be noted, that those things which I here set down, are such as do naturally take the sense, and not respect petty wonderments. It is true, the alterations of scenes, so it be quietly and without noise, are things of great beauty and pleasure; for they feed and relieve the eye, before it be full of the same object. Let the scenes abound with light, specially colored and varied; and let the masquers, or any other, that are to come down from the scene, have some motions upon the scene itself, before their coming down; for it draws the eye strangely, and makes it, with great pleasure, to desire to see, that it cannot perfectly discern. Let the songs be loud and cheerful, and not chirpings or pulings. Let the music likewise be sharp and loud, and well placed. The colors that show best by candle-light are white, carnation, and a kind of sea-water-green; and oes, or spangs, as they are of no great cost, so they are of most glory. As for rich embroidery, it is lost and not discerned. Let the suits of the masquers be graceful, and such as become the person, when the vizors are off; not after examples of known attires; Turke, soldiers, mariners', and the like. Let anti-masques not be long; they have been commonly of fools, satyrs, baboons, wild-men, antics, beasts, sprites, witches, Ethiops, pigmies, turquets, nymphs, rustics, Cupids, statuas moving, and the like. As for angels, it is not comical enough, to put them in anti-masques; and anything that is hideous, as devils, giants, is on the other side as unfit. But chiefly, let the music of them be recreative, and with some strange changes. Some sweet odors suddenly coming forth, without any drops falling, are, in such a company as there is steam and heat, things of great pleasure and refreshment. Double masques, one of men, another of ladies, addeth state and variety. But all is nothing except the room be kept clear and neat.

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16 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

https://sirbacon.org/mmusic.htm

Was Francis Bacon a Masked Musician?  by Mather Walker, January 2003

 

Years ago Mather Walker was what you, Eric, Yann, and A. Phoenix are today pumping out Knowledge. So sad he quietly faded away without a goodbye or explanation. Not even sure if he is alive now. That is harder than saying goodbye.

This quote from the article caught my attention to share:

Dodd thought he caught a glimpse of Bacon in a musical connection when he was still a child. In his “Francis Bacon’s Personal Life Story” Alfred Dodd says:

“In the ‘Duke of Norfolk’s Confession for High Treason,’ we get an illuminating flash into the private life of the Queen as a proud mother of Francis enfolded with the affectionate love of her secret husband Leicester.

When the Court was at Guilford, I went unaware into the Queen’s Privy Chamber; and found her sitting on the threshold of the door listening with one ear to a Little Child who was singing and playing on the Lute to her; and with other to Leicester who was kneeling by her side. The child could have been no other than Francis, who would then be about nine years of age.”

I have the visual! Will never go way now...

 

 

 

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https://britishheritage.com/history/queen-elizabeth-i-slept-here

Before Elizabeth arrived at her destination, the Royal Harbinger would have checked its suitability. If the sovereign had found a place wanting in some detail of comfort during an earlier visit, she didn’t hesitate to upbraid her host-to-be. She stayed with her trusted adviser Sir William More at Loseley House, near Guildford, on four separate occasions during her southern progresses. Each time he was advised to lay straw on the manor drive to prevent the royal carriage from jolting its precious passenger, and he was also told to clean his house better.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_More_(died_1600)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loseley_Park

 

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5 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

Hi Light-of-Truth. Great subject - Was Francis Bacon a composer/musician?

In the "Of Masques and Triumphs" you posted by Bacon, does he NOT mention numbers and mathematics?

Yet, as much as I do NOT know about music, I do know it is based on notes, numbers, and mathematical patterns. Melodies weave through through the flowing rivers of notes, numbers, and mathematical patterns. Richard Ketz knew something about the Sonnets that I have not discovered yet. I want to pass the flaming musical torch to Marvin, a child Genius who is already composing music based on Bacon's numbers. Yet, my hopes are not too high. As much as I wanted to dig into it, I'm already overwhelmed with data. 😉

Marvin, whatever you do, stay on the path of Truth.

Mather also writes farther down his article:

People with musical expertise, who have also had a deep acquaintance with the Shakespeare plays, have tended to believe that the author of the plays was a musician. John Wilson, to cite one example, in his, “Musical Standard” declared his conviction that Shakespeare was a practical musician with an intimate acquaintance with both the theory and practice of music. And there is considerable evidence in the plays to support this claim. In addition to the songs there are the numerous passage that refer to music, often from a very technical and practical standpoint. It has been calculated that there are around 170 passages in the plays that use the words ‘music’, ‘musical’, or ‘musician’; that ‘sing’, or its derivatives occur some 247 times; and that there are between 30 and 40 passages dealing with musical instruments. Furthermore, the constant use of technical terms by ‘Shakespeare’ shows an expert knowledge of both the art of composition, and of the construction of musical instruments.

In a letter written to Sir Robert Cecil, Francis Bacon said:

“And I am of one spirit still. I ever liked the Galenists, that deal with good compositions; and not the Paracelsians, that deal with fine separations: and in music, I ever loved easy airs, that go full all parts together; and not these strange points of accord and discord.”

This is interesting in view of the role the airs played in the plays. Moreover, the musical taste expressed in the plays reflects Bacon’s taste. Consider, for example, the following passage from Richard II:

“ Music do I hear?

Ha. ha! keep time. How sour sweet music is

When time is broke and no proportion kept!”

 

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Thank you so incredibly much for the compliment!! I honestly don't know what to say to "a child Genius" without sounding arrogant or self-righteous. Needless to say, I am incredibly flattered.

The passage from "Of Masques and Triumphs" makes for an interesting window into Bacon's view of music and revelry... it is dense and lofty, like the Shakespeare I've read, but the style seems more critical and less playful. I realize that most of the Bacon I've read has been sonnets and the occasional part of a play - never really the essays he published under his own name. His legal work is dry and distressing. I tried to read "On Treason," and it bored me to tears:) 

I want to thank you all for your encouragement and insight!! I'm glad I could share some of this project. 

And, Light-of-Truth, perhaps you could give me some guidance on creating my own website? Yours is quite effective, and I assume you did the work yourself?

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Marvin, I read Bacon's Essays early on, and was already a cipher treasure hunter in Shakespeare and I too found the Essays boring, at first.

But do not be fooled, as I was. Now in the right mood, his Essays are music to my ears. 😉

Imagine, Marvin, if you had to act "normal", or you could lose your head, literally.  Knowing your Mom is Queen Elizabeth, you are writing the Shakespeare works and only your inner circle friends know and can laugh with you. You are "William Tudor", a Prince who should become King. You are "William Shakespeare" as well, the talk of society and the greatest writer the world has ever seen. But you are known as Francis Bacon, a genius for sure, but to be connected to either other real names would be the end.

He wrote the Essays as Bacon. They are a decoy. Some great Knowledge in them, but purposely not Shakespeare.

OF TRUTH is 103 Simple cipher. Shakespeare is riddled with Bacon signatures, his Essays are signed by SHAKESPEARE.

Keep that in mind.

😉

"These Things are but Toyes, to come amongst such Serious Obseruations." (wink wink)

ofmASQUES.jpg.71b0a7a29f75fb115fe6b528ed5b7ca9.jpg

 

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AHA!!!

I see it now! His language may be hard to pick through sometimes, but I can usually get what he's saying. I do agree with your statement that the essays are something of a decoy... perhaps that's too strong a word, as I'm sure they meant a lot to him. It's always tricky when we're trying to guess the the motivations and intents of people who were intentionally secretive, but I think it is fair to assume that Bacon created the essays to draw attention away from his "other" writing. So, I think a more appropriate word would be "diversion" - as "decoy" implies that they were set up entirely to fool people.

Just my opinion:)

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1 minute ago, Marvin Haines said:

So, I think a more appropriate word would be "diversion" - as "decoy" implies that they were set up entirely to fool people.

True. They were his legacy in some ways. But compared to his other major works, to me they seem much, hmmmm, somewhat simpler.

Yes, the image is from a 1625 copy I bought a few years ago. A treasure. Bacon was alive when it was printed and read for the first time.

DSC_0004.JPG.43367503a3d6c8ebba08ca7f0410429d.JPG

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9 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Years ago Mather Walker was what you, Eric, Yann, and A. Phoenix are today pumping out Knowledge. So sad he quietly faded away without a goodbye or explanation. Not even sure if he is alive now. That is harder than saying goodbye.

This quote from the article caught my attention to share:

Dodd thought he caught a glimpse of Bacon in a musical connection when he was still a child. In his “Francis Bacon’s Personal Life Story” Alfred Dodd says:

“In the ‘Duke of Norfolk’s Confession for High Treason,’ we get an illuminating flash into the private life of the Queen as a proud mother of Francis enfolded with the affectionate love of her secret husband Leicester.

When the Court was at Guilford, I went unaware into the Queen’s Privy Chamber; and found her sitting on the threshold of the door listening with one ear to a Little Child who was singing and playing on the Lute to her; and with other to Leicester who was kneeling by her side. The child could have been no other than Francis, who would then be about nine years of age.”

I have the visual! Will never go way now...

 

 

 

Hi Rob, of particular interest to you as King of the Sonnets, is Sonnet 8 where the above beautiful image is also related.

 

Mark how one string, sweet husband to another

Strikes each in each by mutual ordering,

Resembling sire and child and happy mother,

Who all in one pleasing note do sing.

[Sonnet 8]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonnet_8

Sonnet_8_1609.jpg

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20 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

https://sirbacon.org/mmusic.htm

Was Francis Bacon a Masked Musician?  by Mather Walker, January 2003

 

Thank you for sharing Eric.

At the end of his essay , Mather Walker mentions a Poem about Music and Poetry from "The Passionate Pilgrim".

As I did not know this play, I decided to go to the Source and see if I could find something of interest.

 https://archive.org/details/passionatepilgri00shakrich/page/n67/mode/2up

Right on the first page, something immediatly caught my attention : WIT in acrostic !!! 😀

I knew that someone that we know very well should be hidden in this passage.

image.png.544e99caf4d9d89831070e08de9e5ebc.png

Now, I will take a closer look to the Poem.

 

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