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Robert Greene an Early Literary Mask for Francis Bacon


A Phoenix

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A few days ago Eric asked if anyone could point him in the direction of evidence and information regarding Lord Bacon and Robert Greene and the play The Honourable History of Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay.  So to set matters in motion we thought we might start with the title and inside page of the 1594 edition and the title page of the second 1630 edition.

 

1594 edition  https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc2.ark:/13960/t6g163q8x&view=2up&seq=10&size=150

1630 edition

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friar_Bacon_and_Friar_Bungay#/media/File:Greene_Bacon_and_Bungay_1630.jpg

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According to the bi-literal decipherments by Elizabeth Wells Gallup, Bacon says that for a financial consideration Robert Greene agreed to be one of his literary masks.  Furthermore, In The Tragedy of Anne Boleyn. A Drama in Cipher Found in the Works of Sir Francis Bacon (London: Gay & Bird, 1901) Elizabeth Wells Gallup produces a series of decipherments from works put forward in the name of Robert Greene (or attributed to him) beginning with The Mirror of Modesty (1584) which we have reproduced below (to be followed if required by others in some forthcoming posts). 

Gallup TP.JPG

Gallup p 4.JPG

Gallup p 5.JPG

Gallup p 6.JPG

Gallup p 7.JPG

Gallup p 8.JPG

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There is only one article about Lord Bacon and Robert Greene in Baconiana (Parker Woodward, 'Robert Greene', pp. 12-20) see link below and we have also reproduced a couple of pages of discussion by James Phinney Baxter in The Greatest of Literary Problems The Authorship of the Shakespeare Works.

https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/1907_-Baconiana_No-17-20.pdf     

BAXTER TP.JPG

BAXTER P 479.JPG

BAXTER P 480.JPG

Edited by A Phoenix
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8 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

There is only one article about Lord Bacon and Robert Greene in Baconiana (Parker Woodward, 'Robert Greene', pp. 12-20)

Greene has been mentioned several times in Baconiana besides the one article specifically about him. Here is one mention:

https://sirbacon.org/archives/baconiana/1917_ Baconiana_No 57 - 60.pdf ("THOMAS LODGE" pages 100 to 107)

Robert Greene was called the Ape of Euphues, because he was merely a mask for works put out by Francis, whose early style it was. Early plays by Francis, under the mask of “ Shakespeare, ” were Euphuistic for precisely the same reason.

I've never followed the Greene path much, but find it interesting as I do Cervantes. Side note; my Mother-in-Law born in Cuba from Spanish descent taught Spanish Literature in college in Key West many years ago. She goes nuts when I suggest Bacon might have written Don Quixote! LOL

 

 

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Hi A. Phoenix - what a treasure trove!

Thank you very kindly for going to so much trouble in answer to my question about prior work on the Greene/Bacon authorship issue. The scans and links are just what I was hoping for, and more! Still taking it all in, but I must say that on first impression of Greene's "Repentance" it does sound a lot like Francis Bacon addressing the youth of his day on the vital importance of moral rectitude. (As far as I could see there is not one word about his literary activities in the "Repentance".) If Bacon is putting words into the mouth of Robert Greene in the form of a heart-felt confession of misspent youth, at the same time he is blackening the posthumous reputation of the real Robert Greene, even though he was already deceased. It's a very strange game that Francis is playing: assuming the false identities of his literary masks and leaving posterity to figure out the truth from the lie. I must needs ponder more on't.

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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1 hour ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Greene has been mentioned several times in Baconiana besides the one article specifically about him. Here is one mention:

https://sirbacon.org/archives/baconiana/1917_ Baconiana_No 57 - 60.pdf ("THOMAS LODGE" pages 100 to 107)

Robert Greene was called the Ape of Euphues, because he was merely a mask for works put out by Francis, whose early style it was. Early plays by Francis, under the mask of “ Shakespeare, ” were Euphuistic for precisely the same reason.

I've never followed the Greene path much, but find it interesting as I do Cervantes. Side note; my Mother-in-Law born in Cuba from Spanish descent taught Spanish Literature in college in Key West many years ago. She goes nuts when I suggest Bacon might have written Don Quixote! LOL

 

 

Thanks so much for this reference, Light-of-Truth!

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21 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

According to the bi-literal decipherments by Elizabeth Wells Gallup, Bacon says that for a financial consideration Robert Greene agreed to be one of his literary masks.

I wonder at this deciphered story. Its a fascinating narrative by Bacon. Was it a scientific bilateral decipher process, or did she reach a mystical state of awareness where Bacon could speak with her?

 

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi Rob,

The whole process of decipherment was scientifc and rigorous. 

The Tragedy of Anne Boleyn. A Drama in Cipher Found in the Works of Sir Francis Bacon

https://archive.org/details/tragedyannebole00conggoog/page/n44/mode/2up?ref=ol&view=theater

Read what Elizabeth Wells Gallup deciphered which is in Bacon's words:

It is so much in my minde that I speak thus oft about it, and take my decypherer into confidence, as it were, which doth shewe one of those strange weakenesses of soules in-drawn, like mine, since it needeth noe proofe of the fact that a demonstration would be wholly unnecessary if there were anie man living in the world who could understand these things here hidden ; but I speake or write as if the discypherer sat at my side to take part when required in  th’ deliberations. . . ) Many times I have a sense of my kinde companion's presence, yet at the bottome of every other desire, is a hope that this Cypher shal not have beene scene or read when my summons shall come. Therefore tranquillity is an impossible state, and I am torn betwixt feare that it bee too well hid, and a desire to see all my devices for transmitting this wondrous history, preserved and beque'th’d to a future generatio', undiscovered. . . . (p. 129).

Indeed he is to me a friend who can reach out his hand across the abysm of the ages, and give such aide as none present hath given, or in truth can give to me, in labour of wondrous power. . . . (p. 131).

 

Wow! Bacon felt what we feel! "Many times I have a sense of my kinde companion's presence"

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Thank you A Phoenix for bringing Light back to Elizabeth Wells Gallup!

Until your important The Fraudulent Friedmans article I was under the sad and misled perception that she was debunked and I never looked at her work. In fact, she was almost a taboo subject to mention.

Reading a little of her work yesterday and this morning gave me great pleasure! I've been a little down lately about my lack of accomplishments and am also fighting a horrible flu right now. The quotes I posted above by Bacon lifted me up. I went back to bed shivering under my blankets for a while thinking how what Elizabeth discovered describes my own experiences working in Bacon's ciphers. It is as if Bacon himself would be sitting next to me offering clues and pointing out important keys. I often send thoughts, praises, and emotions back to Bacon from today, "across the abysm of the ages."

No I didn't catch a cold stuffing a chicken... LOL

BTW, A Phoenix, I added the part 2 of your video to What's New and your A Phoenix page today. I was supposed to do it yesterday and missed it. You now have 33 articles up. 🙂

image.png.23b35a7610ce6c7475eac73d3ea9f881.png

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Hi Rob,

I think this was a view about Elizabeth Wells Gallup shared by virtually the rest of the world. Her gargantuan industry and commitment is truly awe-inspiring. I recall one Baconian expressing the view that in the fulness of time her bi-literal decipherments will be seen as the greatest cryptographic feat in history.

As you probably know here in the UK we are experiencing temperatures as low as -5 to -10 degrees overnight which is not getting much above freezing in the daytime. I too have been suffering with a very heavy cold/flu. On the nightime, even after a hot bath and under the bed sheets with hot water bottles, I have been badly shivering for nearly a week and when I have had to get out of bed my teeth start chattering with my legs uncontrollably shaking.

Hope you get well soon and send our best to Theresa.

Thank you for putting up Part 2 of our Video on the What's New Page.

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I would like to share with you, on the fly, something that I've just found and that could be related to both Robert Greene and the Bacon - Shakespeare Manuscript (Northumberland Manuscript).

My last research led me to "The Anatomy of Melancholy" by "Democritus Junior" (Robert Burton)

I don't know if this is something that has already been noticed by the past , but here is what we can see on

the 2nd page of "Democritus Junior ad Librum suum", that is the 6th page of the Book ( 62 = F.B.)

https://archive.org/details/8909832.nlm.nih.gov/page/n11/mode/2up?view=theater

image.png.813fdadbd5ba711ff6662a076a357a8f.png

Wa have the anagram of FFRAVNCIS BACON

image.png.e03c721dcb6ed51daea6d1fb5a7046dc.png

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/91/Northumberland_manuscript_transcription_1904.png

Northumberland Manuscript (Detail)

By the way, FFRAVNCIS BACON = WILL TUDOR = 126 (Simple cipher)

My research on "Zoilus and Momus" led me to this book talking about Francis Bacon and "Criticism".

https://books.google.fr/books?id=Dm4sEAAAQBAJ&pg=PA5&lpg=PA5&dq=zoilus+and+momus+Francis+Bacon&source=bl&ots=8r5HRrcuHe&sig=ACfU3U2mBcBnYHKPaFbXKESf3l1PDaeF0Q&hl=fr&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjjz7L1x_f7AhULUaQEHQ1_BVU4ChDoAXoECBwQAw#v=onepage&q=zoilus and momus Francis Bacon&f=false

(See page 5 and 6 of Introduction)

https://archive.org/details/ofadvancementp00baco/page/324/mode/2up

Then "Zoilus and Momus" led me to "Perymedes, the Blacksmith" by Robert Greene" (1588)

https://archive.org/details/perimedesblacke00greegoog/page/n12/mode/2up

To R. Greene, Gentleman ( Sonnet by I. Eliote)

image.png.72c2592652a831f1485295f481ca5635.png

"Zoilus avaunt, avaunt Momus, maddened dog, infuriated mastiff baying at the silver moon, your calumny will never succeed in harming GREENE"

And finally, Eupheus led me to "Eupheus Anatomy of Wit" by John Lily.

https://sirbacon.org/archives/1946_Baconiana_No 120.pdf

(See John Lily and Eupheus : the Anatomy of Wit, page 103-104)

Edited by Allisnum2er
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1 hour ago, Allisnum2er said:

I would like to share with you, on the fly, something that I've just found and that could be related to both Robert Greene and the Bacon - Shakespeare Manuscript (Northumberland Manuscript).

My last research led me to "The Anatomy of Melancholy" by "Democritus Junior" (Robert Burton)

I don't know if this is something that has already been noticed by the past , but here is what we can see on

the 2nd page of "Democritus Junior ad Librum suum", that is the 6th page of the Book ( 62 = F.B.)

https://archive.org/details/8909832.nlm.nih.gov/page/n11/mode/2up?view=theater

image.png.813fdadbd5ba711ff6662a076a357a8f.png

Wa have the anagram of FFRAVNCIS BACON

image.png.e03c721dcb6ed51daea6d1fb5a7046dc.png

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/91/Northumberland_manuscript_transcription_1904.png

Northumberland Manuscript (Detail)

By the way, FFRAVNCIS BACON = WILL TUDOR = 126 (Simple cipher)

My research on "Zoilus and Momus" led me to this book talking about Francis Bacon and "Criticism".

https://books.google.fr/books?id=Dm4sEAAAQBAJ&pg=PA5&lpg=PA5&dq=zoilus+and+momus+Francis+Bacon&source=bl&ots=8r5HRrcuHe&sig=ACfU3U2mBcBnYHKPaFbXKESf3l1PDaeF0Q&hl=fr&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjjz7L1x_f7AhULUaQEHQ1_BVU4ChDoAXoECBwQAw#v=onepage&q=zoilus and momus Francis Bacon&f=false

(See page 5 and 6 of Introduction)

https://archive.org/details/ofadvancementp00baco/page/324/mode/2up

Then "Zoilus and Momus" led me to "Perymedes, the Blacksmith" by Robert Greene" (1588)

https://archive.org/details/perimedesblacke00greegoog/page/n12/mode/2up

To R. Greene, Gentleman ( Sonnet by I. Eliote)

image.png.72c2592652a831f1485295f481ca5635.png

"Zoilus avaunt, avaunt Momus, maddened dog, infuriated mastiff baying at the silver moon, your calumny will never succeed in harming GREENE"

And finally, Eupheus led me to "Eupheus Anatomy of Wit" by John Lily.

https://sirbacon.org/archives/1946_Baconiana_No 120.pdf

(See John Lily and Eupheus : the Anatomy of Wit, page 103-104)

THE ELIZABETHAN CUCKOO.pdf

Hi Yann. Excellent fossicking for precious stones of wisdom along the shores of the mind. Thank you for drawing our attention to Edward Johnson's study of the literary masks worn by Lord Bacon, which at first glance looks terrific! 

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Here's an interesting extract from Edward D Johnson's 1946 Baconiana article, "The Elizabethan Cookoo".

image.png.25a1bcf88007e4e6a3111985b3a00e2b.png

 

So I found a copy of "The Anatomy of Melancholy" supposedly by Robert Burton. And there, as promised by Edward Johnson, is a blueprint for "The New Atlantis". It could ONLY have been written by Sir Francis Bacon. He envisages "a just army of Rosey Cross men". I have not checked "A Treatise of Melancholy" dated by Johnson to 1586, to see how similar or dissimilar the two books are.

The Anatomy of Melancholy.pdf

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Anatomy_of_Melancholy#/media/File:Robert_Burton's_Anatomy_of_Melancholy,_1626,_2nd_edition.jpg

image.png.15da2db810f6339b5e4e222fb63aa1d4.png

 

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Another interesting snippet from Edward Johnson's "The Elizabethan Cookoo" which concerns "A Choice of Emblems" reputedly by Geffrey Whitney:

image.png.b0c04d8f824a5554c83da17fee7d60b7.png

image.png.e922f4db36eb1d870c77fbee6acb5f0d.png

image.png.8d3b9ee83047a2fef1e96368dcf54059.png

I know you are all very familiar with "A Choice of Emblems", but I did not suspect that it was a work of Francis Bacon's per se. Published 1586 and possibly commenced in France in the late-1570s.

https://digital.libraries.psu.edu/digital/collection/emblem/id/314

Edited by Eric Roberts
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"For I hate these severe, unnatural, harsh, German, French, and Venetian decrees, which exclude plebeians from honours, be they never so wise, rich, virtuous, valiant, and well qualified, they must not be patricians, but keep their own rank, this is naturae bellum inferre, odious to God and men, I abhor it. My form of government shall be monarchical." The Anatomy of Melancholy

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6 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

Another interesting snippet from Edward Johnson's "The Elizabethan Cookoo" which concerns "A Choice of Emblems" reputedly by Geffrey Whitney:

image.png.b0c04d8f824a5554c83da17fee7d60b7.png

image.png.e922f4db36eb1d870c77fbee6acb5f0d.png

image.png.8d3b9ee83047a2fef1e96368dcf54059.png

I know you are all very familiar with "A Choice of Emblems", but I did not suspect that it was a work of Francis Bacon's per se. Published 1585 and possibly commenced in France in the late-1570s.

https://digital.libraries.psu.edu/digital/collection/emblem/id/314

Has anyone else suggested this was Bacon’s work? Peter Dawkins come to mind. Its a familiar emblem book with us.

Edited by Light-of-Truth
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1 hour ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Has anyone else suggested this was Bacon’s work? Peter Dawkins come to mind. Its a familiar emblem book with us.

Edward Johnson has my respect. I'll add though that I've come across theories that Bacon wrote everything ever written, which is an exaggeration on the extreme. Years ago I was bombarded with emails about Bacon being reincarnated over and over again by several names and is alive today. It seems there are some way out Bacon theories. And I am well aware I am way out there on some of my opinions. I'm open to evidence and have experienced more than mainstream allows. But...

Combined all of the out-there Bacon concepts are still nothing compared to the Willy on Avon make-believe. Still as way out as I am, I try to filter what I can.

In the Johnson article you mention, Eric, I took an interest in "Thomas Watson." A new name, even if I had read this article years ago, it was a fresh idea. "TW", which could be a hint at "WT" (William Tudor), especially at the early time Watson appeared. I didn't spend much time looking and didn't find anything to follow.

The Whitney emblems is very important, but I am doubtful Bacon did this. I flipped through the book this afternoon seeing if any clues pop up that mean anything to me and nothing new was revealed. I'm eager to be shown some Light though!

 

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As far as I know, which is a very short distance, Peter Dawkins' book "ArcadiA" has a section on "A Choice of Emblems". I could only find one of his articles in Baconiana 1987 in which he briefly refers to it. However, there is this essay by Parker Woodward from 1916 Baconiana, No 53 - 56, in which he makes a very good case for Francis Bacon as the directing mind behind the project.

A CHOICE OF EMBLEMS - WOODWARD 1916.pdf

 

image.png.b00606136c4211afa2b64268a6471f82.png

Edited by Eric Roberts
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Ok, I am intrigued.

https://sirbacon.org/archives/baconiana/1916_ Baconiana_No 53 - 56.pdf - pages 11-12 (copy/paste from a PDF is a pain so please excuse typos.)

First place was, of course, given to the Earl of Leicester, Francis Bacon’s father, to whom the book is specially dedicated, then followed (as frequently with Francis) a reverent verse to the Deity. After that an emblem, having special reference to the Queen.

The second series of Emblems begins with verses in praise of the Earls of Warwick and Leicester, followed by another set in praise of Sir Philip Sidney. Other Emblems are dedicated to Leicester’s, two chaplains, and to Sir John Norris, and other captains of the expeditionary army. Two of the judges remembered, one of them (Needjham) was married to Jane, a daughter of Lord Keeper Nicholas Bacon. Two London physicians, the Queen ’ s Organist, one of her Equerrys, and the Dean and Head Master of St. Paul's Cathedral received notices. Two Emblem verses of considerable length are addressed to the poet, Edward Dyer, a particular friend and associate of Francis Bacon. On the whole a very representative collection of the notables of the day. Those persons whose initials are only given are impossible to trace, but as Drake is referred to probably Walter Raleigh was meant by the initials Ra. W. He seems to have belonged to the literary group.

The evidence that the compiler of " The Choice ” was a much more powerful intellectual personality than a whole family of Whitneys is shown in the " Epistle Dedicatorie.” The only man at that date who had the great learning and mental grasp to write that powerful epistle was Francis Bacon. The style alone betrays him, not to mention the amazing range of authorities quoted. He pressed the importance of learning and the eternising to all posterities of the record of things worthy of memory. He compares man to a bubble of water. The writer figures himself as emulating the labours of learned men, " although of all the meanest.”

Compare Bacon writing as " Spenser ” in Colin Clout, 1595, in allusion to the daughters and family of Sir John Spencer, of Althorpe, “ of which I meanest boast myself to be.”

He says about the Emblems, " divers of the inventions are of my owne slender workmanship,” but he values them chiefly because under pleasante devises are profitable moralles. Always the hidden teacher ! That Bacon was the author may also be deduced from the address to the Reader. “ I offer it heare (good reader) to thy viewe in the same sorte as I presented before.” (Compare Heming and Condell's words to the reader in the Shakespeare Folio, " Are now offered to your viewe ”).

98 results on SirBacon.org for a search on Choice of Emblems:

https://sirbacon.org/search_gcse/?q=A Choice of Emblems

 

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