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The Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript (formerly known as the Northumberland Manuscript)


A Phoenix

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29 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

This is obviously a modern spelling of the 1594 Diaries.

Dec 28,Sat play, by Lord Admiral’s Men; payees included Edward Alleyn.
also Dec 28: play, by Lord Chamberlain’s Men.

Payees for the two plays by the Lord Chamberlain’s Men: William Kemp, William Shakespeare, and Richard Burbage, ‘servants to the Lord Chamberlain’.T
[This is the only mention of Shakespeare in these Elizabethan accounts].

Also Dec 28: A company of actors played a ‘Comedy of Errors’ at Gray’s Inn at night, as part of the Gray’s Inn Revels:

A second ‘Grand Night’, with many lords and ladies present. There was ‘such a disordered tumult and crowd upon the stage’ that an ‘ambassador’ from the Inner Temple left early with other ‘Templarians’, the only ‘sports’ offered were ‘dancing and revelling with gentlewomen; and after such sports a Comedy of Errors (like to Plautus his Menaechmus) was played by the players. So the night...was ever afterwards called the Night of Errors’.

The players were ‘a company of base and common fellows’.

How was "Shakespeare" spelled in the original? Just curious.

 

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19 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

The Premier of The Comedy of Errors

#TheBacon-ShakespeareManuscript #ShakespeareAuthorship #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #LovesLaboursLost #NorthumberlandManuscript #RichardII #RichardIII #RomeoandJuliet #NorthumberlandHouse #ConferenceofPleasure #JamesSpedding #JohnBruce #NorthumberlandManuscript #Rosicrucians #EdwinDurningLawrence #JeanOvertonFuller #AnthonyBacon #RobertDevereux #ElizabethI #PhilipSidney #RobertDudley #LeicestersCommonwealth #ComedyofErrors #GraysInn

BACON-SHAKESPEARE MANUSCRIPT 68.png

Beautifully Done AP!

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The Baconian Dramatic Device Concealing the Secret Rites of his Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Brotherhood

#TheBacon-ShakespeareManuscript #ShakespeareAuthorship #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #LovesLaboursLost #NorthumberlandManuscript #RichardII #RichardIII #RomeoandJuliet #NorthumberlandHouse #ConferenceofPleasure #JamesSpedding #JohnBruce #NorthumberlandManuscript #Rosicrucians #EdwinDurningLawrence #JeanOvertonFuller #AnthonyBacon #RobertDevereux #ElizabethI #PhilipSidney #RobertDudley #LeicestersCommonwealth #ComedyofErrors #GraysInn #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry

BACON-SHAKESPEARE MANUSCRIPT 71.png

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The Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript Dates No Later than Early 1597

#TheBacon-ShakespeareManuscript #ShakespeareAuthorship #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #LovesLaboursLost #NorthumberlandManuscript #RichardII #RichardIII #RomeoandJuliet #NorthumberlandHouse #ConferenceofPleasure #JamesSpedding #JohnBruce #NorthumberlandManuscript #Rosicrucians #EdwinDurningLawrence #JeanOvertonFuller #AnthonyBacon #RobertDevereux #ElizabethI #PhilipSidney #RobertDudley #LeicestersCommonwealth #ComedyofErrors #GraysInn #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry

BACON-SHAKESPEARE MANUSCRIPT 72.png

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The Letter Written by Bacon to Queen Elizabeth

#TheBacon-ShakespeareManuscript #ShakespeareAuthorship #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #LovesLaboursLost #NorthumberlandManuscript #RichardII #RichardIII #RomeoandJuliet #NorthumberlandHouse #ConferenceofPleasure #JamesSpedding #JohnBruce #NorthumberlandManuscript #Rosicrucians #EdwinDurningLawrence #JeanOvertonFuller #AnthonyBacon #RobertDevereux #ElizabethI #PhilipSidney #RobertDudley #LeicestersCommonwealth #ComedyofErrors #GraysInn #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry

BACON-SHAKESPEARE MANUSCRIPT 73.png

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15 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

The Letter Written by Bacon to Queen Elizabeth

#TheBacon-ShakespeareManuscript #ShakespeareAuthorship #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #LovesLaboursLost #NorthumberlandManuscript #RichardII #RichardIII #RomeoandJuliet #NorthumberlandHouse #ConferenceofPleasure #JamesSpedding #JohnBruce #NorthumberlandManuscript #Rosicrucians #EdwinDurningLawrence #JeanOvertonFuller #AnthonyBacon #RobertDevereux #ElizabethI #PhilipSidney #RobertDudley #LeicestersCommonwealth #ComedyofErrors #GraysInn #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry

BACON-SHAKESPEARE MANUSCRIPT 73.png

1594.pdf

Curious to know more about the conspiracies referred to in the Phoenix's slide, I've extracted key events from the Folger's records of life at court during Elizabeth's reign: https://folgerpedia.folger.edu/mediawiki/media/images_pedia_folgerpedia_mw/3/3b/ECDbD_1594.pdf

Jesuits were directly or indirectly involved in two of the three plots against Her Majesty: the first in June by Henry Walpole, a Jesuit priest, and the second in August by Edmund Yorke and Richard Williams. The first plot was discovered in January. The accused, Dr Roderigo Lopes, was a former Jew who had converted to Christianity and served the Queen as her private physician for thirteen years. 

In his book, Who Wrote Don Quixote, Francis Carr says this about Dr Lopes:

The official report on Dr Lopez was written by Francis Bacon. It was entitled ‘A True Report on the Detestable Treason, intended by Doctor Roderigo Lopez, a physician attending upon the person of the Queen’s Majesty, whom he, for a sum of money, promised to be paid by the King of Spain, did undertake to have destroyed by poison.’ Lopez was incriminated by the evidence, how true we do not know, of other Spaniards and Portuguese, who were arrested on charges of espionage. Bacon, in this report, shows he is definite in his belief that Lopez was guilty. Later he wrote with admiration of the Jews in The New Atlantis, his vision of Utopia. In this work, his attitude is clearly philosemitic. And in his essay on Usury, a Jewish practice, he declared that “Since there must be borrowing and lending; and men are so hard of heart as they will not lend freely, usury must be permitted.” This was a bold statement. At that time usury was the accepted word for money lending, a service which the Jews provided. Christian doctrine preached that lending money with interest was a sin. Bacon may have felt, full of remorse, that Lopez was in fact innocent, as Elizabeth herself thought, until Essex and her ministers persuaded her to allow the sentence to be carried out.

There is also this short article about Dr Lopes from a medical journal:

DOCTOR RODERIGO LOPES.pdf

 

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8 hours ago, Christie Waldman said:

Light-of-Truth, I am with you on the things you were saying, more than you know.

Bacon's words always bring me back to where I need to be. A link I posted for fun for another thread on the fly, when I read it a few times I wanted to come back here.

https://www.bartleby.com/82/27.html

Now for the passage between Scylla and Charybdis (understood of the conduct of the understanding) certainly it needs both skill and good fortune to navigate it. For if the ship run on Scylla, it is dashed on the rocks, if on Charybdis, it is sucked in by the whirlpool: by which parable (I can but briefly touch it, though it suggests reflexions without end) we are meant to understand that in every knowledge and science, and in the rules and axioms appertaining to them, a mean must be kept between too many distinctions and too much generality,—between the rocks of the one and the whirlpools of the other. For these two are notorious for the shipwreck of wits and arts.

 

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13 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

There is also this short article about Dr Lopes from a medical journal:

I'm confused! LOL

Did Bacon condemn or defend Lopes?

Page 8 of DOCTOR RODERIGO LOPES.pdf:

Francis Bacon, who was Essex's 'protege', refers to Lopes as a man 'very observant and officious, and of a pleasing and pliable behaviour' (in: 'True Report of the Detestable Treason intended by Dr. Rodrigo Lopez, a physician attending upon the person of the Queen's Majesty' (Zeman).

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21 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

I'm confused! LOL

Did Bacon condemn or defend Lopes?

Page 8 of DOCTOR RODERIGO LOPES.pdf:

Francis Bacon, who was Essex's 'protege', refers to Lopes as a man 'very observant and officious, and of a pleasing and pliable behaviour' (in: 'True Report of the Detestable Treason intended by Dr. Rodrigo Lopez, a physician attending upon the person of the Queen's Majesty' (Zeman).

Hi Light-of-Truth. Thanks for the question. Francis was directly involved in the Lopes, or Lopez affair, first as an interrogator and later as chronicler of the plot, which he seems to have sincerely believed had threatened the life of Queen Elizabeth. It is now generally believed that Dr Lopez was innocent and that Francis was wrong. Not sure if it will help but here are two more snippets on the subject from two issues of Baconiana:

The Essex-Bacon intelligence service was responsible for the conviction and execution of Dr. Lopez, the Queen's physician, for High Treason on a charge of attempting to poison her: the Cecils believed in his innocence. The Queen herself also appears to have been sceptical as to the truth of the charge, but this did not prevent the unfortunate doctor from being tried on the capital charge in February 1594, and being executed at Tyburn on the 7th of June following.

Anthony Bacon, who spent many years abroad, largely in Navarre at the Court of Henry IV, and did not return home till 1592, supplied his brother Francis with information concerning foreign affairs which was used by Essex as a counter weight to the intelligence service maintained by “the Cecils:” thus, there existed a rivalry between them and Essex and the two Bacons in the service of the Queen.

1948_Baconiana_No 127: WILLIAM CECIL, LORD BURGHLEY By W. G. C. Gundry

 

________________________________________________________________

 

Meanwhile we pass on to the more seriously meant passages. The first of these occurs in a railing speech of Gratiano’s against Shylock in the trial scene of The Merchant of Venice (4.1. 128):—

O, be thou damned, inexecrable dog!
And for thy life let justice be accused.
Thou almost mak’st me waver in my faith
To hold opinion with Pythagoras,3
That souls of animals infuse themselves
Into the trunks of men: thy currish spirit

Govern'd a wolf, who hanged for human slaughter,

Even from the gallows did his fell soul fleet,

And whilst thou lay'st in thy unhallowed dam,

Infused itself in thee; for thy desires
Are wolfish, bloody, starved, and ravenoics.

’Reincarnation means literally re-fleshing;

Metempsychosis, trans-souling;

Palingenesis, re-birth.

Dover Wilson in the Cambridge edition of the Play.
Note the contrast between Christian “faith" and heathen “opinion."

 

The Commentators conjecture that Shakespeare had actually in mind a man of his own days—the Portuguese Jew of the name of Lopez (Lopus, Lupus, Wolf) who was executed at Tyburn in 1594. Modem historians are doubtful about Lopez’ guilt, and are inclined to ascribe his conviction to Essex's personal grudge against him. We may leave the doubt for what it is worth. What is of significance for us is that Shakespeare as well as Bacon were evidently quite sure of it. Both were equally strong in their condemnation of the meditated crime, and no doubt entirely satisfied with the justice of the severe ordeal to which the criminal was subjected—"hanging, drawing, and quarter­ ing, amid universal execration."

 

For Shakespeare’s conviction, Gratiano is the witness; for Bacon's, "A true report" from his hand "of the detestable treason intended by Dr. Rodrigo Lopez, a physician attending upon the Queen’s Majesty, whom he, for a sum of money, promised to be paid to him by the King of Spain, did undertake to have destroyed by poison, etc." In this report Bacon describes the intended felony as against all honour, all society, all humanity, odious to God and man, detested by the heathen themselves . . against nature, the laws of nations, the honour of arms, the civil law, the rules of morality and policy . . the most condemned, barbarous, and ferine act that can be imagined.
Note: “Ferine" means savage like a wild beast (Latin: ferns), “like a wolf" for example. The "ferine" adjectives used by Shakespeare to describe Lopez’ intended "human slaughter, "Wolvish, bloody, starved, and ravenous”,
are therefore another strong "parallel" pointing towards the identity of the statesman-philosopher and the poet.

 

1947_Baconiana_No 125: BACON ON REINCARNATION By James Arther

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1 hour ago, Eric Roberts said:

Hi Light-of-Truth. Thanks for the question. Francis was directly involved in the Lopes, or Lopez affair, first as an interrogator and later as chronicler of the plot, which he seems to have sincerely believed had threatened the life of Queen Elizabeth.

Interesting. I may still be confused, but have a direction to look! LOL

Bacon would always in any situation protect his Mother. Even above his Brother. For good reason as well.

Merchant of Venice?

Govern'd a wolf, who hanged for human slaughter,

I'm looking and finding our mathematician Dr. Dee. Maybe I'll be able to share something that makes sense "out of context".

 

image.png.f0b258d90edc7c75f4b51acfc425a022.png

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OK, you know

2 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

Govern'd a wolf, who hanged for human slaughter,

OK, you know I can't know about a "hang" in Shakespeare and not find the Bacon. It's a challenge and if I can't find Bacon with "hang" it is because I am missing something! LOL

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/197/index.html%3Fzoom=850.html

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/doc/MV_F1/page/17/index.html

image.png.8196db6c3c0d25de601509b877759795.png

See the red "Letters"? Uppercase A, C, N, and O, and there are two lowercase "b"s. That allows for "Bacon" to be like a Janus? Up and down between two "hangs"?

"Pythagoras" bring me back to Dee and he is here. Both Bacon and Dee are here, playing.

Let me ask, how does this read:

O be thou damn'd, inexecrable dogge, The throned Monarch better then his Crowne. And for thy life let iustice be accus'd: His Scepter shewes the force of temporall power, Thou almost mak'st me wauer in my faith; The attribute to awe and Maiestie, To hold opinion with Pythagoras, Wherein doth sit the dread and feare of Kings: That soules of Animals infuse themselues. But mercy is aboue this sceptred sway, Into the trunkes of men. Thy currish spirit It is enthroned in the hearts of Kings, Gouern'd a Wolfe, who hang'd for humane slaughter, It is an attribute to God himselfe; Euen from the gallowes did his fell soule fleet; And earthly power doth then shew likest Gods And whil'st thou layest in thy vnhallowed dam, When mercie seasons Iustice.

 

It's kind of weird, but I follow. I'm reading two columns as if they were one left to right. Don't think about it too much, I am just playing...

image.png.fc21ff179c19099615bf7aba531aca63.png

Funny though, this page has so many paths to chase!

https://sirbacon.org/owencirculation.htm

"I have oft seene Dr. William Harvey, the new doctor from Padua, at Bartholomew Hospital, in the presence of the learned doctors, force a purple, distilling liquor through the veines of a dead body, and, after it had descended to the heart, liver, and lungs, the blood-coloured liquor returneth againe to the face which blacke and full of blood, or pale, meagre, and bloodless before, doth blush and beautifie, as if with life; you would think the body breathed; the very lippe is warme to look upon; but we are mock’d with art as there is no pulse gainst the finger and though the arteries seem full, yet no life is present. The legs, waist, arms, hands, brow, and limbs seem alive, but we can never ransome nature. The doctor was enrolled at Caius College."-Francis Bacon

Mather Walker made quite the contribution to SirBacon.org and is relevant to this day and popped up for me. Down the page a bit you can find what I am posting below that touches me by Mather Walker:

https://sirbacon.org/twelfthnight.htm

Twelfth Night In Context

In 1607 Francis Bacon wrote a short work titled, "The Clue to the Maze".  It began, "Francis Bacon thought in this manner."  The phrase could not be more appropriate to the present study.  When trying to understand the meaning of any 'Shakespeare' play exactly what is needed is to  keep in mind the manner in which Bacon thought.  Francis Bacon was a superman.  Another superman would instantly recognize the author of Twelfth Night as one of his kind by the peculiar holoistic quality of the play.  But these beings are very rare.  If others exist they are like whales listening for other whales across a thousand miles of freezing ocean.  In the consciousness of the superman everything is present at once.  Patterns are seen that ordinary humans do not see because the data grasped in one perception by the superman is spread out over time in the linear consciousness of ordinary man.  Imagine someone shown a likeness an artist had drawn, while another is only shown small portions of that same drawing over a period of days. The person who saw all of the drawing at once could recognize the person, but the person shown small portions over a period of time could not.

Bacon saw patterns we cannot see because we are not capable of that perception in which all is part of one whole.  I emphasize this because although I have glimpsed the unity of theme in Twelfth Night, when I try to convey what I have glimpsed I will likely fall short in my attempt to show how much Bacon seamlessly blended together in the miracle of art he called, 'Twelfth Night'.  And, of course, In addition to the manner in which Bacon thought we need to be familiar with those stock ideas which were a staple of his thought. I will just point out three of these:

(1) Bacon conveyed the information he wanted to convey through the mode of allegory, metaphor, and allusion.  He tells us this in his preface to The Wisdom of the Ancients:

"And even to this day, if any man would let new light in upon the human understanding,
and conquer prejudice, without raising contests, animosities, oppositions, or disturbance,
he must still go in the same path [as the ancients], and have recourse to the like method
of allegory, metaphor, and allusion."

(2) Bacon built a  Janus design into the plays. Each play has two faces, one face looking toward the past, the other toward the future. One face looks at the course and progress of the ancients in some particular aspect of knowledge. The other, looking toward the future, contrasts Bacon's method with theirs and shows that his is better by demonstrating the operation of his discovery device in inquiring into the form of a related aspect of knowledge.

 

 

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One more quickie before I hit the sack...

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/197/index.html%3Fzoom=850.html

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/doc/MV_F1/page/17/index.html

"Seal" always gets my attention. Surely there is a Seal number to be found, but I have not found it yet. Not that I've looked very long. I'm getting sleeeeepy...

BOND we know is 33 Simple the same as BACON because we are aware of modern day 007, etc.

But look between "speake" and "shall" and we have 74 words which is the Simple cipher of WILLIAM and also TUDOR.

image.png.0b11ca7c769f98d52fe8d906fee564d0.png

If you wonder if "speake" and "shall" might hint at Shakespeare, consider this:

SHALL SPEAKE is 103 Simple cipher the same as SHAKESPEARE.

image.png.c13e209f495abe4db46952322e6a3569.png

Good night! Sweet dreams!

 

 

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Letters by Francis Bacon

#TheBacon-ShakespeareManuscript #ShakespeareAuthorship #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #LovesLaboursLost #NorthumberlandManuscript #RichardII #RichardIII #RomeoandJuliet #NorthumberlandHouse #ConferenceofPleasure #JamesSpedding #JohnBruce #NorthumberlandManuscript #Rosicrucians #EdwinDurningLawrence #JeanOvertonFuller #AnthonyBacon #RobertDevereux #ElizabethI #PhilipSidney #RobertDudley #LeicestersCommonwealth #ComedyofErrors #GraysInn #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry

BACON-SHAKESPEARE MANUSCRIPT 74.png

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The Bacon Family Links to the Dukes of Norfolk

#TheBacon-ShakespeareManuscript #ShakespeareAuthorship #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #LovesLaboursLost #NorthumberlandManuscript #RichardII #RichardIII #RomeoandJuliet #NorthumberlandHouse #ConferenceofPleasure #JamesSpedding #JohnBruce #NorthumberlandManuscript #Rosicrucians #EdwinDurningLawrence #JeanOvertonFuller #AnthonyBacon #RobertDevereux #ElizabethI #PhilipSidney #RobertDudley #LeicestersCommonwealth #ComedyofErrors #GraysInn #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry

BACON-SHAKESPEARE MANUSCRIPT 75.png

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Tudor State Politics

#TheBacon-ShakespeareManuscript #ShakespeareAuthorship #FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #LovesLaboursLost #NorthumberlandManuscript #RichardII #RichardIII #RomeoandJuliet #NorthumberlandHouse #ConferenceofPleasure #JamesSpedding #JohnBruce #NorthumberlandManuscript #Rosicrucians #EdwinDurningLawrence #JeanOvertonFuller #AnthonyBacon #RobertDevereux #ElizabethI #PhilipSidney #RobertDudley #LeicestersCommonwealth #ComedyofErrors #GraysInn #Rosicrucians #Freemasonry

BACON-SHAKESPEARE MANUSCRIPT 76.png

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Bacon was not Essex's protege! (as stated by the Baconiana article by S. Kottek, citing Zeman's article published in a medical journal, which Eric quoted and linked to). It was the other way around! 

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14 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

There is also this short article about Dr Lopes from a medical journal:

I'm confused! LOL

Did Bacon condemn or defend Lopes?

Page 8 of DOCTOR RODERIGO LOPES.pdf:

Francis Bacon, who was Essex's 'protege', refers to Lopes as a man 'very observant and officious, and of a pleasing and pliable behaviour' (in: 'True Report of the Detestable Treason intended by Dr. Rodrigo Lopez, a physician attending upon the person of the Queen's Majesty' (Zeman).

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2 minutes ago, Christie Waldman said:

Bacon was not Essex's protege! (as stated by the Baconiana article by S. Kottek, citing Zeman's article published in a medical journal, which Eric quoted and linked to). It was the other way around! 

    •  
 

I'm confused! LOL

Did Bacon condemn or defend Lopes?

Page 8 of DOCTOR RODERIGO LOPES.pdf:

Francis Bacon, who was Essex's 'protege', refers to Lopes as a man 'very observant and officious, and of a pleasing and pliable behaviour' (in: 'True Report of the Detestable Treason intended by Dr. Rodrigo Lopez, a physician attending upon the person of the Queen's Majesty' (Zeman).

Hi Christie. I agree with you that "protege" is the wrong word. Would you allow that Essex's access to and influence with the Queen, together with the fact that he was eager to advance Francis's career, constitute a kind of political mentoring?

 

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I think it is interesting to read Claire Asquith's book on the Shakespeare sonnets, in light of Essex and Bacon's relationship. Bacon was trying to mentor the hot-headed Essex, not the other way around. I think you have to challenge all the historical assumptions. All are suspect because of potential conflicts of interest that exist because of the huge myth that has been perpetuated on the public in terms of the royal birth. Claire Asquith, Shakespeare and the Resistance: The Earl of Southampton, the Essex Rebellion, and the Poems that Challenged Tudor Tyranny (Public Affairs, 2018). First find out what the true facts are, then draw conclusions, right? Bacon's inductive reasoning.

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It should, I think, be mentioned that in Brian Vickers "Note on the Text" to his Francis Bacon: The Major Works, he relates how the version he printed of "Of Tribute, or giving that which is due," 22-51, benefits from  a "newly discovered" and "superior manuscript" to the one found in the Northumberland Manuscript which was published by Spedding in 1870 as "A Conference of Pleasure." (As noted by Vickers, Spedding had published before that a version made from "two defective and incomplete manuscripts." (See vol 1 of The Letters and Life  or Spedding 8: 121-142, Vickers "Note on the Text," xlix-l).

As Vickers relates, Dr. Peter Beal discovered this "superior" manuscript which now is the property of the Kodama Memorial Library of Meisei University, Tokyo.). In his "Note on the Text," Vickers tells how he prepared his edition from a transcription of this manuscript which Dr. Henry Woudhuysen made for him from a microfilm, "collating it against the other two manuscripts." ("Note on the Text," xlix-l).  I do not have a copy of the Oxford Francis Bacon edition in front of me, but  assume this would be the text its editors used.

On the topic of Essex and Bacon's relationship, note that Spedding wrote,on p. 119 (119-123), under the heading #6, "But as Essex aspired to distinction in many other ways, so Bacon studied in many other ways to help him: among the rest by contributing to those fanciful pageants or "devices," as they were called, with which it was the fashion of the time to entertain the Queen on festive occasions. On the anniversary of her coronation in 1595, we happen to know positively (though only by the concurrence of two accidents) that certain speeches unquestionably written by Bacon were delivered in a device presented by Essex: and I strongly suspect that two of the most interesting among his smaller pieces were drawn up for some similar performance in the year 1592. I mean those which are entitled "Mr. Bacon in Praise of Knowledge" and "Mr. Bacon's Discourse in Praise of his Sovereign." (Spedding 8:119). On p. 121, he writes, in this context,  "What little we do know of the facts therefore is compatible with my conjecture." (going on to discuss his source on that page).

My book, Francis Bacon's Hidden Hand, p.96, references Stanley Wells' acknowledgement that Bacon's speeches for the 1595 device for Queen Elizabeth were attributed by title page to Henry Cuffe but were in fact in Bacon's own handwriting. The reference is Stanley Wells and Gary Taylor, William Shakespeare: A Textual Companion (New York: W. W. Noron, 1997, corrected and reprinted from 1987 ed.), p. 76.

 

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15 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Interesting. I may still be confused, but have a direction to look! LOL

Bacon would always in any situation protect his Mother. Even above his Brother. For good reason as well.

Merchant of Venice?

Govern'd a wolf, who hanged for human slaughter,

I'm looking and finding our mathematician Dr. Dee. Maybe I'll be able to share something that makes sense "out of context".

 

image.png.f0b258d90edc7c75f4b51acfc425a022.png

Great finding Rob ! I think that we can add "Call the Messengers" to the list . Indeed, in hebrew the word מֲלְאָךְ translated by the word "Angel" means "Messenger", Angels being the Messengers of G-d.

"Bring us the "Enochian" Letters, Call the Messengers." 😊

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14 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

One more quickie before I hit the sack...

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/197/index.html%3Fzoom=850.html

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/doc/MV_F1/page/17/index.html

"Seal" always gets my attention. Surely there is a Seal number to be found, but I have not found it yet. Not that I've looked very long. I'm getting sleeeeepy...

BOND we know is 33 Simple the same as BACON because we are aware of modern day 007, etc.

But look between "speake" and "shall" and we have 74 words which is the Simple cipher of WILLIAM and also TUDOR.

image.png.0b11ca7c769f98d52fe8d906fee564d0.png

If you wonder if "speake" and "shall" might hint at Shakespeare, consider this:

SHALL SPEAKE is 103 Simple cipher the same as SHAKESPEARE.

image.png.c13e209f495abe4db46952322e6a3569.png

Good night! Sweet dreams!

 

 

Well spotted Rob !❤️ Here is what I noticed thanks to your finding ...

image.png.b69821c5588d8a5f95bfd816018125c1.png

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/Bran_F1/197/index.html%3fzoom=1200.html

Edit :

An additional thought ...

https://tarot-heritage.com/from-trionfi-to-majorarcana/lappeso-le-pendu-the-hanged-man/

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Edited by Allisnum2er
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3 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

Here is what I noticed thanks to your finding ...

I looked for Tudor and did not find. You show how it is there and in fact very prominent! 🙂

The Hanged Man is something I'd like to play with. It was the first Tarot card I learned (not that I am a Tarot master at all).

I like this version from 1425:

https://tarot-heritage.com/from-trionfi-to-majorarcana/lappeso-le-pendu-the-hanged-man/

image.png.221010b3d3e42938fc500b7019c52309.png
ROSENWALD TAROT
c. 1475

To me, the Hanging Man is patient, kind of at peace, knowing that however long he hangs, it is right. We know that Bacon has been Hanging for 400 years, and I can't imagine how he can be so patient. I go crazy with my impatience wanting his Truth to be known. LOL

 

 

 

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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56 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

To me, the Hanging Man is patient, kind of at peace, knowing that however long he hangs, it is right. We know that Bacon has been Hanging for 400 years, and I can't imagine how he can be so patient. I go crazy with my impatience wanting his Truth to be known. LOL

Hi Rob,I understand your impatience  ! 🙂 To me, the Hanging man is the 12th Tarot Card .The number 12 hides and is linked to the number 21 (The World), and 12+21 = 33 = BACON (Hang-Hog is latten for Bacon, I warrant you.)

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The below is clipped from  this page:

https://www.sacred-texts.com/eso/sta/sta31.htm

The Tarot is undoubtedly a vital element in Rosicrucian symbolism, possibly the very book of universal knowledge which the members of the order claimed to possess. The Rota Mundi is a term frequently occurring in the early manifestoes of the Fraternity of the Rose Cross. The word Rota by a rearrangement of its letters becomes Taro, the ancient name of these mysterious cards. W. F. C. Wigston has discovered evidence that Sir Francis Bacon employed the Tarot symbolism in his ciphers. The numbers 21, 56, and 78, which are all directly related to the divisions of the Tarot deck, are frequently involved in Bacon's cryptograms. In the great Shakespearian Folio of 1623 the Christian name of Lord Bacon appears 21 times on page 56 of the Histories. (See The Columbus of Literature.)

Many symbols appearing upon the Tarot cards have definite Masonic interest. The Pythagorean numerologist will also find an important relationship to exist between the numbers on the cards and the designs accompanying the numbers. The Qabbalist will be immediately impressed by the significant sequence of the cards, and the alchemist will discover certain emblems meaningless save to one versed in the divine chemistry of transmutation and regeneration.' As the Greeks placed the letters of their alphabet--with their corresponding numbers--upon the various parts of the body of their humanly represented Logos, so the Tarot cards have an analogy not only in the parts and members of the universe but also in the divisions of the human body.. They are in fact the key to the magical constitution of man.

Farther down the page we read this:

The twelfth numbered major trump is called Le Pendu, the Hanged Man, an portrays a young man hanging by his left leg from a horizontal beam, the latter supported by two tree trunks from each of which six branches have been removed. The right leg of the youth is crossed in back of the left and his arms are folded behind his back in such a way as to form a cross surmounting a downward pointing triangle. The figure thus forms an inverted symbol of sulphur and, according to Levi, signifies the accomplishment of the magnum opus. In some decks the figure carries under each arm a money bag from which coins are escaping. Popular tradition associates this card with Judas Iscariot, who is said to have gone forth and hanged himself, the money bags representing the payment he received for his crime.

 

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