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In the News today : What-shakespeare-really-looked-like-the-only-portrait-painted-during-his-lifetime


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If this painting was in my house and I wanted to sell it at an auction, claiming it is the only contemporary painting of Shakespeare would be a great way to raise the bids.

I suspect the Fools who fall for this will not be bidding too high. LOL

 

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2 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

If this painting was in my house and I wanted to sell it at an auction, claiming it is the only contemporary painting of Shakespeare would be a great way to raise the bids.

I suspect the Fools who fall for this will not be bidding too high. LOL

2 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

If this painting was in my house and I wanted to sell it at an auction, claiming it is the only contemporary painting of Shakespeare would be a great way to raise the bids.

I suspect the Fools who fall for this will not be bidding too high. LOL

 

 

£10,000,000 is the asking price. Perfectly timed for the 400th anniversary of the First Folio next year. The problem, especially for Stratfordians, is that the Peake painting bears no resemblance to Martin Droeshout's famous "portrait" of Shakespeare which, of course, has no "trademark beard"! If accepted as a genuine painting of Shakespeare, the Peake portrait must surely prove that the Droeshout engraving is either a false (made up) representation of the playwright or a hopelessly incompetent one. You can't have it both ways.

image.jpeg.0c06660b0d6b0fa66c1a8bf6210f3ed0.jpeg

 

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It is not a portrait of Shakespeare. If it was, it would have been reproduced a million times since 1608.

Imagine what Bacon's portraits will be worth when the real Truth is Known.

I saw an article that a coin from the 1460s was found in New Newfoundland recently. They implied it was "proof" that visitors were there hundreds of year before anyone suspected. Does that mean nobody in the 1600's carried old coins in their pockets?

 

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Galileo was 44 in 1608. Green eyes and red beard, like the "surprise" Shakespeare painting long forgotten and nobody considered interesting enough to mention.

I wonder, were there very many people born in 1564? 😉

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domenico_Tintoretto#/media/File:Galileo_Galilei_2.jpg

image.png.17c46ea1d76586007bdc73d9a31de212.png

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image.jpeg.f8127825171d46b781c6c319ebc0567a.jpeg

image.jpeg.b0817690649a7b3741a661752738b2b2.jpeg

The familiar picture on the right is known as "The Chandos Portrait of William Shakespeare" and is the best bet that the National Portrait Gallery have of what Shakespeare may have looked like. If the recently surfaced Robert Peake "Shakespeare" portrait is passed off at auction as a genuine image of the author of the plays, where does that leave one of the U.K.'s premiere art institutions? What's more, Stanley Wells has backed a completely different 17th Century portrait known as "the Cobb". Sadly, it has been identified by the NPG as a painting of the tragic Thomas Overbury, as mentioned elsewhere in this forum.

image.jpeg.d205763ab7b81184175f7acbc3ad073f.jpeg

 

 

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Eric , you really are a kill-joy !!! 😄

Personally, I really thought for a moment that it was the last portrait of Marlowe alive and well in 1608 ! 🤣

I second A Phoenix.  This is a brilliant demonstration, a demystifcation according to the rules !

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Thanks Eric for the demolition job! The media tends to trot out speculations that could be factual when they are just that speculations just to grab your attention. This has been the general approach to all things related to the Authorship. They prefer to keep the "Controversy" on going giving life to the Four Idol speculators of the market place instead of getting it.

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7 minutes ago, Lawrence Gerald said:

Thanks Eric for the demolition job! The media tends to trot out speculations that could be factual when they are just that speculations just to grab your attention. This has been the general approach to all things related to the Authorship. They prefer to keep the "Controversy" on going giving life to the Four Idol speculators of the market place instead of getting it.

Hi Lawrence. I've heard that there are literally hundreds of fake "Shakespeare" portraits out there - a procession of wanna-be contenders stretching back 250 years or more. The last big push to resolve the matter was, I think, the Searching for Shakespeare exhibition in 2006 at the NPG, from which the Chandos (NPG) and the Cobb (Stratford Birthplace Trust) emerged in the public eye as "probable" but not proven contemporary depictions of W.S. And now we have the Peake portrait as the new favourite. As you suggest, speculation and controversy are good for business. Leonardo da Vinci's "Salvator Mundi" was purchased in 2005 in a New Orleans auction for just over $1,000. Twelve years later is sold at Christies for $450,000,000. 

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I have my pick on who it is:

Henry Percy, 9th earl of Northumberland

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Henry-Percy-9th-earl-of-Northumberland

It's the "tuff" of hair on his forehead, no other portrait of a man born around 1564 has that, certainly not the other images of Willy. Long kind of crooked nose as well.

image.png.9b940c9e7f3d41cc91e59913dde07893.png

Henry Percy was in the Tower in 1608. Would someone paint a portrait of anyone in the Tower in 1608?

Side note: Stumbled on something that might not be well know:

The History of Gorhambury. 1821

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=yale.39002034558461&view=1up&seq=62

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17 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

I have my pick on who it is:

Henry Percy, 9th earl of Northumberland

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Henry-Percy-9th-earl-of-Northumberland

It's the "tuff" of hair on his forehead, no other portrait of a man born around 1564 has that, certainly not the other images of Willy. Long kind of crooked nose as well.

image.png.9b940c9e7f3d41cc91e59913dde07893.png

Henry Percy was in the Tower in 1608. Would someone paint a portrait of anyone in the Tower in 1608?

Side note: Stumbled on something that might not be well know:

The History of Gorhambury. 1821

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=yale.39002034558461&view=1up&seq=62

 

Two great finds, Light-of-Truth! I like your pick of Henry Percy (the earl, not Bacon's servant of the same name) and agree that there's a resemblance, especially the hair.      I'll look into this further. Meanwhile, I'm very grateful to you for the link to Lady Grimston's History of Gorhambury, which I'm very much looking forward to reading, as I never new it existed. The following quote from her book about the burial of Sir Nicholas Bacon in St Paul's Cathedral in 1579 fits with some images I found recently of the remains of the once elaborate tomb-monument. The old Lord High Chancellor's funeral must have been a solemn and grand occasion, with eighteen year-old Francis no doubt playing a leading role in the proceedings.

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image.jpeg.a6a65513991e95eb231884d8033eb577.jpeg

 

 

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1 hour ago, Light-of-Truth said:

I have my pick on who it is:

Henry Percy, 9th earl of Northumberland

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Henry-Percy-9th-earl-of-Northumberland

It's the "tuff" of hair on his forehead, no other portrait of a man born around 1564 has that, certainly not the other images of Willy. Long kind of crooked nose as well.

image.png.9b940c9e7f3d41cc91e59913dde07893.png

Henry Percy was in the Tower in 1608. Would someone paint a portrait of anyone in the Tower in 1608?

Side note: Stumbled on something that might not be well know:

The History of Gorhambury. 1821

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=yale.39002034558461&view=1up&seq=62

After a quick look around, all I could find were these two images of Henry Percy:

image.jpeg.772f706ca246cb2c73e2d32ca8bcb05f.jpeg

I'm inclined to think the person in the Robert Peake portrait isn't Henry Percy, 9th Earl of Northumberland (1564-1632). Even so, a very interesting character who paid the price of his convictions as a prominent member of the Gunpowder Plot. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Percy,_9th_Earl_of_Northumberland I wonder if Francis knew him well?

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This article mentions he knew Bacon:

http://www.percyfamilyhistory.com/?page_id=534

Northumberland preferred his independence, his laboratory , his garden and his ‘pypes of tobacco’, for he was hopelessly addicted to the weed. He enjoyed the company of intelligent men . He was the ‘favourer of all good learning, and Maecenas of learned men’. His accounts are full of payments to writers, geographers and scientists; he knew Shakespeare (and formed a collection of early quartos), Francis Bacon, Ben Johnson, Edmund Spencer and the aged magus, Dr John Dee, who settled at nearby Mortlake.

Same article later is interesting:

Northumberland took with him into captivity a large number of books, retorts, crucibles, alembics, zodiacal charts and globes’, also a selection of his favourite pipes. Food, good wine, and quantities of tobacco were sent to him regularly, and baskets of fruit were dispatched from his orchards at Syon. Sir Walter Raleigh and other kindred spirits were fellow prisoners, and there were also visitors, and he had living with him 3 wise men, scientists known as the ‘Three Magi’ who assisted him with his experiments. He played chess and draughts, and an early version of kriegspiel, for one item in his accounts is for 300 model soldiers and other necessary equipment.

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Here's an engraving that shows his long kind of crooked nose and the tuft on his tall forehead. It is dated 1619 while he was still in the Tower.

https://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/portrait/mw80606/Henry-Percy-9th-Earl-of-Northumberland?LinkID=mp88443&role=sit&rNo=2

image.png.48510f57ccd0f18f0ecf7133310a7065.png

https://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/person/mp88443/henry-percy-9th-earl-of-northumberland

 

 

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3 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

This article mentions he knew Bacon:

http://www.percyfamilyhistory.com/?page_id=534

Northumberland preferred his independence, his laboratory , his garden and his ‘pypes of tobacco’, for he was hopelessly addicted to the weed. He enjoyed the company of intelligent men . He was the ‘favourer of all good learning, and Maecenas of learned men’. His accounts are full of payments to writers, geographers and scientists; he knew Shakespeare (and formed a collection of early quartos), Francis Bacon, Ben Johnson, Edmund Spencer and the aged magus, Dr John Dee, who settled at nearby Mortlake.

Same article later is interesting:

Northumberland took with him into captivity a large number of books, retorts, crucibles, alembics, zodiacal charts and globes’, also a selection of his favourite pipes. Food, good wine, and quantities of tobacco were sent to him regularly, and baskets of fruit were dispatched from his orchards at Syon. Sir Walter Raleigh and other kindred spirits were fellow prisoners, and there were also visitors, and he had living with him 3 wise men, scientists known as the ‘Three Magi’ who assisted him with his experiments. He played chess and draughts, and an early version of kriegspiel, for one item in his accounts is for 300 model soldiers and other necessary equipment.

Interesting that he knew not only Francis Bacon, but Ben Jonson, Edmund Spencer, Dr Dee... and "Shakespeare". Also, that he owned a number of Shakespeare quartos to boot. Thanks for digging this out.

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On 11/17/2022 at 3:39 AM, Lawrence Gerald said:

"William Shakespeare had 30 of his plays licensed by Master of the Revels Edmund Tilney, after performing them for him in the great hall of the Priory of St John."

This is from an interesting article about the history of the Office of the Revels: https://museumstjohn.org.uk/history-revels-office/

I wonder who was directing the Shakespeare plays at the dress rehearsals in the great hall at the Priory of St John? 

"In Elizabeth's reign, when sacred things were roughly handled, Tylney, the queen's Master of the Revels, resided at St. John's, with all his tailors, embroiderers, painters, and carpenters, and all artificers required to arrange court plays and masques. In this reign Master Tylney licensed all plays, regulated the stage for thirty-one years, and passed no less than thirty of Shakespeare's dramas, commencing with Henry IV. and ending with Anthony and Cleopatra; he might have told us one or two things about the "great unknown," but he died in 1610, and left no diary or autobiography. The court revels were all rehearsed in the great hall at St. John's. In 1612 James I. gave the priory to Lord Aubigny, and the Revels Office was removed to St. Peter's Hill. The house afterwards came into the possession of Sir William Cecil, grandson of the famous Lord Treasurer Burleigh.”

 

https://www.british-history.ac.uk/old-new-london/vol2/pp309-328

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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Hi Eric and Rob,

As you both know the so-called Northumberland Manuscript which originally contained Lord Bacon's two Shakespeare plays Richard II and Richard III was found at Northumberland House in the middle of the nineteenth century. This collection of manuscripts which originally belonged to Lord Bacon has still not yet yielded up all its secrets. I am at the moment in the process of completing a long work on this unique historical document which I have re-named the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript. When I have completed it (within the next couple of weeks) I will send you both a copy of it with two accompanying videos brilliantly titled by me Part 1 and Part 2! 😁

Edited by A Phoenix
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