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Statues of Francis Bacon


A Phoenix

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Statue at South Square Gray's Inn

I’m sure we are all aware of the beautiful Francis Bacon statue in bronze by sculptor Frederick William Pomeroy unveiled 27th June 1912 at South Square Gray’s Inn.

In Francis Bacon The Commemoration of his Tercentenary at Gray’s Inn (London: Printed at the Chiswick Press by order of the Masters of the Bench For Private Circulation, 1913) is a wonderful image of this statue that seems to be in marble? Is this another version or blueprint of what now stands at Gray’s Inn.? It is very similar in many ways although facially it does appear to be a little different.

This version also appears in 1911 Pall Mall Magazine (so prior to a version being unveiled at Gray’s Inn)

https://archive.org/details/picturesof1911pa00lond/page/118/mode/2up?view=theater

FB GRAYS INN.jpg

Grays Inn.jpg

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Statue at Burlington House, The Royal Academy of Arts

Another most wonderful and probably little known statue is in a niche at The Royal Academy of Arts. This is probably the Great One in younger days but I believe captures him perfectly, especially the eyes.

Statue of Sir Francis Bacon by William Theed, Jr., 1869, in one of the ground-story niches on the right-hand side of The Royal Academy of Arts, Burlington House, 6 Burlington Gardens, W1, London. Photograph by Magdolna and Istvan Hargittai, in Stephen F. Mason, Structural Chemist and Historian of Science—a centenary remembrance

https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Statue-of-Sir-Francis-Bacon-by-William-Theed-Jr-1869-in-one-of-the-ground-story_fig3_363256406

Statue-of-Sir-Francis-Bacon-by-William-Theed-Jr-1869-in-one-of-the-ground-story.png

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

Statue at South Square Gray's Inn

I’m sure we are all aware of the beautiful Francis Bacon statue in bronze by sculptor Frederick William Pomeroy unveiled 27th June 1912 at South Square Gray’s Inn.

In Francis Bacon The Commemoration of his Tercentenary at Gray’s Inn (London: Printed at the Chiswick Press by order of the Masters of the Bench For Private Circulation, 1913) is a wonderful image of this statue that seems to be in marble? Is this another version or blueprint of what now stands at Gray’s Inn.? It is very similar in many ways although facially it does appear to be a little different.

This version also appears in 1911 Pall Mall Magazine (so prior to a version being unveiled at Gray’s Inn)

https://archive.org/details/picturesof1911pa00lond/page/118/mode/2up?view=theater

FB GRAYS INN.jpg

Grays Inn.jpg

I know very little about sculpture, but the marble and bronze look almost identical to me. Perhaps someone commissioned Pomeroy, having seen the Gray's Inn statue, to create a marble copy for their villa? During the late-Victorian, early Edwardian periods, F W Pomeroy seems to have been the go to guy if you want a large scale statue of a famous historical figure to grace your stately home or add prestige to an august institution. Extraordinary skill in terms of carving and casting.

image.png.49096312ed22dc31ec80ccf569fbc602.png

Edited by Eric Roberts
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3 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

We too know very little about sculpture. Like you say maybe the marble version is in someone's stately home somewhere - certainly a statement piece!!🙂♥️

Can anyone enlighten me regarding the significance of the roses on Francis's shoes which appear on all three examples of Victorian sculpture? I've read somewhere that they symbolised his role as the founder of Rosicrucianism, but was decorating your shoes with flowers a common 'thing' amongst early-17th Century gentlemen, or was this unique to FB? Surely, at court or Gray's Inn, such a flamboyant fashion statement-cum-secret symbol would have attracted considerable attention.

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In the case of Lord Bacon not only was he a member of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood but the roses on his shoes is to signify that he was the Founding Father of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood, which was the intention of his private secretary and Fellow Brethren Sir Thomas Meautys with the roses on the Statue of FB in St Michael's Church. 

It could be that later representation of Bacon allegorically  include the roses but whether he wore them in his lifetime is unknown and perhaps like you say would attract attention.

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1 minute ago, A Phoenix said:

In the case of Lord Bacon not only was he a member of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood but the roses on his shoes is to signify that he was the Founding Father of the Rosicrucian Brotherhood, which was the intention of his private secretary and Fellow Brethren Sir Thomas Meautys with the roses on the Statue of FB in St Michael's Church. 

It could be that later representation of Bacon allegorically  include the roses but whether he wore them in his lifetime is unknown and perhaps like you say would attract attention.

Got It! 🙂

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6 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

Fascinating finds A Phoenix! In my ignorance, I was silly enough to think that shoe roses were real, from the garden. The realistic-looking roses on FB's feet in the two sculptures by Pomeroy may have compounded this false assumption. However, as Andrew Beckett quotes in the third link you posted: "When shoestrings were worn, they were covered, where they met in the middle, by a ribband (ribbon) gathered in the form of a rose." Wearing rosettes on one's shoe buckles, it seems, was all the rage among the aristocracy of both genders. Here are a couple of interesting short articles on the subject in case you missed them.

https://theshoeman647325124.wordpress.com/2021/03/20/17th-century-shoe-ribbons-roses-and-rosettes-a-brief-history/

https://fashionhistory.fitnyc.edu/roses-rosettes/

image.png.a1ab7885c0204eda198895a5acc5101c.pngimage.png.0f62734a06b9108a98c49e3484454d57.png

 

 

The impression I get is that the term "shoe rose" became a generic expression for any fancy covering of the laces/buckle. Check out the garnishes on the feet of Edward Sackville, 4th Earl of Dorset! Light-of-Truth pointed out a little while ago that in none of the contemporary portraits of Sir Francis do we see his feet. Pity, as I suspect his ribbon rosettes must have been of the highest quality of artisanal workmanship. Only in his case were they less a fashion statement than a sign of secret Brotherhood (and Sisterhood.) Thank you AP for this stimulating discussion.

image.png.2afa16b68c495690acf46851a774a74f.png

 

 

 

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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  • 1 year later...

Francis Bacon Statue at the John Ryland's Library, Manchester

Statue of Francis Bacon at the University of Manchester’s John Ryland’s Library, one of the finest examples of neo-Gothic architecture in Europe. The statue is by Robert Bridgeman & Son of Lichfield 1895–1897. A statue of Shakespeare is placed alongside him!John Rylands Library.png

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Terracotta Bust of Francis Bacon at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London, Caird Collection

‘Head-and-shoulders terracotta bust of Francis Bacon, the head turned to sitter's right, in contemporary 17th-century dress including hat, and signed on reverse 'Michl. Rysbrack 1755'. This is one of eight busts of British worthies made by Rysbrack for Sir Edward Littleton's new house, Teddesley Hall near Stafford (now demolished), when he was furnishing it in neo-classical style. They essentially comprised four pairs: Raleigh (SCU0043) and Bacon, Shakespeare and Pope, Cromwell (SCU0014) and Milton, and Newton and Locke. Bacon was a politician, Lord Chancellor of England and an important scientific philosopher. His writings underpin the experimental empiricism by which navigation, astronomy and many other fields advanced in Britain from the late 17th century.’

https://www.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/rmgc-object-63946

Royal Museums Greenwich.jpg

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2 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Terracotta Bust of Francis Bacon at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London, Caird Collection

‘Head-and-shoulders terracotta bust of Francis Bacon, the head turned to sitter's right, in contemporary 17th-century dress including hat, and signed on reverse 'Michl. Rysbrack 1755'. This is one of eight busts of British worthies made by Rysbrack for Sir Edward Littleton's new house, Teddesley Hall near Stafford (now demolished), when he was furnishing it in neo-classical style. They essentially comprised four pairs: Raleigh (SCU0043) and Bacon, Shakespeare and Pope, Cromwell (SCU0014) and Milton, and Newton and Locke. Bacon was a politician, Lord Chancellor of England and an important scientific philosopher. His writings underpin the experimental empiricism by which navigation, astronomy and many other fields advanced in Britain from the late 17th century.’

https://www.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/rmgc-object-63946

Royal Museums Greenwich.jpg

Hi A Phoenix

Thank you for informing us of this wonderful piece of work. I love it, even if it is not the face of Francis Bacon as such, but an 'impression' of our idea of him. 

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3 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Francis Bacon Statue at the John Ryland's Library, Manchester

Statue of Francis Bacon at the University of Manchester’s John Ryland’s Library, one of the finest examples of neo-Gothic architecture in Europe. The statue is by Robert Bridgeman & Son of Lichfield 1895–1897. A statue of Shakespeare is placed alongside him!John Rylands Library.png

Hi A P

Much prefer the John Rylands Library statue to the one on the Burlington Gardens facade of the Royal Academy.

ScreenShot2024-01-04at9_37_10pm.png.b28aa556b2eb8ee621ae0804e1550855.png

ScreenShot2024-01-04at9_37_00pm.png.4371d81372e062da3344ab3f83257bbb.png

 

Here's another angle of the John Rylands Library statue. 

ScreenShot2024-01-04at9_34_37pm.png.7b4e270980098d822fc9361bf632b9f7.png

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Statue of Francis Bacon in Caen stone by Thomas Woolner at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History

Founding Father of the modern era, ‘He argued that the purpose of scientific advancement was to improve the human condition. These two beliefs continue to underpin scientific methods and philosophy today.’

Ox museum.png

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53 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

Statue of Francis Bacon in Caen stone by Thomas Woolner at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History

Founding Father of the modern era, ‘He argued that the purpose of scientific advancement was to improve the human condition. These two beliefs continue to underpin scientific methods and philosophy today.’

Ox museum.png

Hi A Phoenix,

Thank you for sharing!

The WOW is for two reasons, the first one being because the Statue is superb, the second one because I am about to post something that I have just found, related with another well known "finger" 😉 ...

scroll.jpg

https://sirbacon.org/gallery/west.htm

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image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

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Good Year folks.

Ref the two roses on FB shoes:

Go Latin:    R  O  S  A  ==> 17  14  18  1 sum:  50

thus two roses make 100 or FRANCIS BACON.

50 is also the number of LOVE, so "two loves" gives us 100.

But that's only on the topsoil so to speak. We can dig further if we so wish.

To expand on this: each rose is actually a double rose, or Tudor rose.

In Heraldry we read "Double rose is a term used for a when it has not only five petals, but additionally five petals within the outer petals. It is in essence a combination of two roses, one on top of the other. "

So what we actually have is four roses in total. This  can be shown to hide a numeric sequence, such that certain Rosicrucian names can be derived. To see them we need to consider what lies at the root of those flowers.

imho

"Two loves I have of comfort and despair,
  Which like two spirits do suggest me still"

from Sonnet 144

 

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The man in the moone was not a buffoon

 

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On 10/9/2022 at 12:05 AM, A Phoenix said:

Statue at South Square Gray's Inn

I’m sure we are all aware of the beautiful Francis Bacon statue in bronze by sculptor Frederick William Pomeroy unveiled 27th June 1912 at South Square Gray’s Inn.

In Francis Bacon The Commemoration of his Tercentenary at Gray’s Inn (London: Printed at the Chiswick Press by order of the Masters of the Bench For Private Circulation, 1913) is a wonderful image of this statue that seems to be in marble? Is this another version or blueprint of what now stands at Gray’s Inn.? It is very similar in many ways although facially it does appear to be a little different.

This version also appears in 1911 Pall Mall Magazine (so prior to a version being unveiled at Gray’s Inn)

https://archive.org/details/picturesof1911pa00lond/page/118/mode/2up?view=theater

FB GRAYS INN.jpg

Grays Inn.jpg

Pomeroy's statue of FB was hit during the Blitz, so another one had to be created after the war. Rumors circulated years ago by Oxfordians that DeVere was reburied under the current Gray's Inn statue so he could become one with Shake-Speare.

lplate.jpeg

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7 hours ago, Lawrence Gerald said:

Rumors circulated years ago by Oxfordians that DeVere was reburied under the current Gray's Inn statue so he could become one with Shake-Speare.

Why am I laughing thinking of Edward de Vere being buried beneath a statue of Sir Francis Bacon so he could be one with Shakespeare! Of course, that is as close as he could 'Vere be. LOL

 

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