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Ben Jonson tells us Bacon is Shakespeare


Guest Ryan Murtha

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Guest Ryan Murtha

The Strats are apt to rally Ben Jonson to their cause, specifically the prefatory material he contributed to the First Folio. However, Jonson's Timber, or Discoveries Made upon Men and Matter, published posthumously in 1641, states that Bacon “performed that in our tongue which may be compared, or preferred, either to insolent Greece or haughty Rome . . . he may be named and stand as the mark and acme of our language.” This is somewhat puzzling, as Bacon published just three books in English during his life, the Essays (in successively expanded editions, 1597, 1612, 1625), The Advancement of Learning (1605), and The History of the Reign of King Henry VII (1622). Even more strangely, Jonson (who was sparing in his praise of other writers) had already bestowed the same encomium upon Shakespeare in the First Folio:

Leave thee alone for the comparison

Of all that insolent Greece or haughty Rome

Sent forth, or since did from their ashes come.

The Strats are faced with two possibilities here: either Jonson changed his mind and decided there were actually two writers in English at the time whose work surpassed anything from Greece and Rome, or they are one and the same. This is a pretty strong point in Bacon's favor, but hasn't gotten much notice so far as I can tell. 

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Ben Jonson's Second Folio is a goldmine.

On the same page 102 of Timber, or Discoveries Made upon Men and Matter, we can found another treasure.

                            I have ever observ'd it, to have beene the office of a wise Patriot, among the greatest affaires 
                            of the State, to take care of the Common-wealth of Learning ...

                                                             ... This made the late Lord S. Albane, entitle his worke, novum oraganum.
                            Which though by the most of superficiall men ; who cannot get beyond the Title of Nominals,
                            it is not penetrated, nor understood : it really openeth all defects of Learning, whatsoever ; and is a Booke.

                                                                       Qui longum noto scriptori porriget ævum.

Ben Jonson quotes Horatio (De Arte Poetica), but he makes an obvious mistake.
Indeed, he uses the latin word "porriget" instead of "prorogat
 
                                                                       Qui longum noto scriptori prorogat ævum.

"PORRIGET" comes from the verb "PORRIGO" meaning TO EXTEND in the sense of " TO STRETCH".

"PROROGAT" comes from the verb "PROROGO" meaning TO EXTEND but in the sense of "TO PROLONG".

This is all the more surprising in that Ben Jonson's translation of De Arte Poetica, with the original  Latin text ,
can be found in this Second Folio, and we can read :
 Et longum noto scriptori prorogat ævum.

So, this is not a mistake but a clue ! Ben Jonson invites us to take into account his translation.

And here is his translation :

                                                                        The Poëms void of profit, our grave men
                                                                        Cast out by voyces ; want they pleasure, then
                                                                        Our Gallants give them none, but pass them by :
                                                                        But he hath every suffrage can apply
                                                                        Sweet mix'd with sowre, to his Reader,so
                                                                        As doctrine, and delight together go
                                                                        This booke will get the Sofii money ; This
                                                                        Will passe the Seas, and long as nature is,
                                                                        With honour make the farre-knowne Author live
.

Notice  " A COB " in acrostic, the anagram of BACO.

Casto(u)r and Very Sweet are Castor and Pollux (from the Greek Polydeuces, meaning very sweet) : The Divine Twins.                                                                

But why "porriget" instead of "prorogat"?

ALL IS NUMBER.

By using the simple Elizabethan cipher or the Classical Latin alphabet (23 letters) cipher :

prorogat = 104  but porriget = 103 = the simple cipher of SHAKE-SPEARE 

Moreover :  Qui longum noto scriptori porriget ævum = 459  (if we admit that the value of æ = a = 1)

459 is the gematria of the "Perfect Ashlar".

https://www.masoncode.com/movable-jewels/

This number was also concealed by Ben Jonson in the poem he wrote for the 60th anniversary of Francis Bacon,

a poem published for the first time in .... his Second Folio !

Lord Bacon's Birth-day

  HAile happie Genius of this antient pile!    
           How comes it all things so about thee smile?    
           The fire, the wine, the men! and in the midst,    
            Thou stand’st as if some Mysterie thou didst!    
     Pardon, I read it in thy face, the day            
               For whose returnes, and many, all these pray :    
 And so do I.   This is the sixtieth yeare    
                  Since Bacon, and thy Lord was borne, and here;    
           Sonne to the grave wise Keeper of the Seal,    
                    Fame and foundation of the English Weale.            
           What then his Father was, that since is hee,    
Now with a Title more to the Degree;    
             Englands high Chancellor : the destin’d heire,    
    In his soft Cradle, to his Father’s Chaire,    
                               Whose even Thred the Fates spinne round, and full,            
         Out of their Choycest and their whitest wooll.
                      ‘Tis a brave cause of joy, let it be knowne,
                For ‘t were a narrow gladnesse, kept thine owne.
              Give me a deep-crown’d-Bowle, that I may sing
In raysing him the wisdome of my King

The sum of the value of all the capital letters is  ... 459 !

Let's take a look at the 459th page of Shake-speare's First Folio, counting from Ben Jonson's poem "To the Reader"

 

The first part of Henry the Sixth Act 3 -Scene 1 (page 106)

 

       Uncles of Gloucester and of Winchester,
            The special watchmen of our English weal,
      I would prevail, if prayers might prevail,
 To join your hearts in love and amity.

 

This is the only page of the First Folio where the expression "English Weal" appears.

And here is, on the same page, the Truth about Francis Bacon, the Prince Tudor.

               My Lord, we know your Grace to be a man
                Just and upright; and, for your Royal Birth,
     Inferior to none but to his Majestie:
               And ere that we will suffer such a Prince,
              So kind a Father of the Common-weale,
           To be disgraced by an Ink-horne Mate,
                    Weand our Wives and Children all will fight
                      And have our bodies slaughtered by thy foes.

                      (The letter W can be seen like the Greek Letter Sigma Σ)


 

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  • 11 months later...
22 minutes ago, peethagoras said:

In his eulogy in the First Folio, Ben Ionson  (101) said that William Shakespeare had "small Latin and less Greek".

I believe Ben was absolutely correct. In fact I can prove it to anyone cares to discuss these things.

Sure, I'd love to hear about it!

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Hello L.O.T

I took your advice and have done it again:

Ref Ben Jonson's eulogy in the First Folio:

His poem fills two pages. (See images marked BI_1 and BI_2).

The part in question says:

"And though thou hadst small Latine, and lesse Greeke,
From thence to honour thee, I would not seeke
For names;"

----------------------------------------

Ref BI_1:

See line 14: it ends with a question mark, it is isolated on the line.

The famous "small Latine, and lesse Greeke," appears on line 31.

Notice that the end "ke" pair in "Greeke" is isolated at end of line.

It is the only occurrence of "Greeke" on that page.

So "ke" ends line 31 and the pair stick out.

Also sticking out is "?" at end of line 14.

Could this mean question the pair "ke"?

Or perhaps question the 13th letter at the beginning of line 31?

----------------------------------------

Now ref BI_1:

The end pair "ON" in IONSON stick out.

N was 13th of alphabet. O was the 14th.

The first 3 words on line 13 on that page consist of 14 letters:

"The merry Greeke"

It is the only occurrence of "Greeke" on that page. This makes two such occurrences of "Greeke" in his poem.

A letter count of "The merry Greeke" shows that the 13th letter is "K", the 14th being "e", thus attracting attention to the pair "ke".

Now for the small Latine:


In the name VVILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

or even in the Latin name used in the so-called 'baptism church record' GVILIELMVS Shakspere:

the Latin word PAVLVS can be found:

It means "small", therefore showing that Shakespeare has "small Latin".

-----------------------

          Now for "lesse Greeke":

By using Latin GVILIELMVS with SHAKESPEARE* it is possible to find LESSE GREEKE

    
 "And though thou hadst small Latine, and lesse Greeke,
From thence to honour thee, I would not seeke
For names;"

 

BI_1.jpg.6046b7f9b406b7bf0e62e8af3b9f43dd.jpg

 

 

BI_2.jpg.ef85af8eca8a2d0d6622b214dae4ca34.jpg

 

* the spelling of Shakespeare is given by Jonson in the 5th word of his poem.

 

In passing:

Jonson's first line says: "TO dravv no envy (Shakespeare) on they name"

If the two brackets are included as a group, then there are 5 groups of symbols up to (Shakespeare).

 

Using just the group (Shakespeare), and counting the symbols beginning at "(",  we find that the 5th symbol is  "k".

But if only letters are counted, the 5th is "e". Thus we have ke.

 

  There are 13 letters up to the "y" in "envy", there are 14 symbols if the first bracket, is included.

 N is the 13th of the alphabet and O is the 14th.

 

Refer to the end two letters in IONSON:

Jonson's first line "TO dravv no envy (Shakespeare) on they name"  has "no"  followed by "on".

A glance at the Stratford monument text will show that above  "SHAKSPEARE" is "ENVIOUS", and under it is "NAME".

 

"envy (Shakespeare) on they name"

 

 

Edited by peethagoras
resubbmission and expansion of subject.
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The man in the moone was not a buffoon

 

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  • 2 months later...

Hi everyone,

I would like to share with you something that I've just find thanks to ... Alexander Waugh !

I moved away from screens this last 3 days. I decided to take a look at youtube 1 hour ago and discovered a new video

posted by Mr Waugh about Ben Jonson's "Discoveries".

Please, take a look at the video to understand what will follow ...

He made a great discovery but, for me, he missed the point, trying to make his finding to fit with the "1740" and "De Vere" theory.

https://archive.org/details/workesofbenjamin00jons/page/n647/mode/2up?ref=ol&view=theater

The fact is that "De Shake-speare nostrat." = 20 letters

"Augustus in Hat." = 13 letters

20 + 13 = 33 = BACON

image.png.0562b7034e960b4e32b6a57855c7b85b.png

In this part of the puzzle, Ben Jonson mentions Caesar.

.image.png.c20b6083ba067a7cbaf28cde9ddd3ccf.png

https://archive.org/details/workesofbenjamin00jons/page/n653/mode/2up?ref=ol&view=theater

The fact is that Jules Caesar is mentionned right in the part of page "102" that Mr Waugh cut in his video.

And I don't talk about the famous and well known sentence "either to insolent Greece, or haughty Rome".

And the cherry on the cake !

Mr Waugh mentions the importance of LORD VIROLANUS and not VIROLAMUS telling us that it is not the same thing and that it is a reference to

JOHANNES SULPITIUS VERULANUS.

I think that he is absolutely right about the reference.

But contrarly to what he believes , VERULAN and VERULAM are the same.

image.png.93935e4d2c3dd7eb9db2a33e0e325379.png

https://books.google.fr/books?id=P_1MsJpanM0C&pg=PP1&hl=fr&source=gbs_selected_pages&cad=2#v=onepage&q&f=false

In his books , Sulpitius was called JEAN SULPICE DE ST ALBAN, dit VERULAN.

https://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/gutbook/lookup?num=62248

DOMININUS VERULANUS or ST ALBAN LORD VERULAM aka FRANCIS BACON !!!

image.png.e8cabcb74533671e13fb906c2b5a3154.png

😊

 

 

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I would like to share another proof that DOMINUS VERULANUS is a reference to LORD VERULAM aka Francis Bacon.

"HISTOIRE NATURELLE" published in 1631 🙂 

https://books.google.bj/books?id=swSFSdqhEf8C&printsec=frontcover&hl=fr&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

image.png.7dc511bc8a9edaad54a0a1cdfa732191.png

BARON DE VERULAN

And here is an idea ...

image.png.d76dc1a7c32d49ff434cfe37edb4086d.png

VV TUDOR REX or SON ?

Interestingly, I learned that Antoine de Sommaville is the one behind the printing in 1656 of "Les Contreverses" de Sénèque that is the French Translation of Controversias, the same "Contreversias" Ben Jonson refers to cryptically in "Discoveries" in the passage about Shakespeare.

(See Mr Waugh' s demonstration in the previous video)

https://books.google.fr/books?id=U-cMn41MqOMC&printsec=frontcover&hl=fr&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

 

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7 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

CC (33) - TT (Thirty Three)

There is but one minde in all these men, and it is Immortall, look about you:

BACON

image.png.62386be9d790a26c14a57ffcc0bab512.png

Great findings Rob  ! 🤩❤️

I would be tempted to say that Great minds think alike ! 😊

Here is what I was working on yesterday night, right before to go to sleep ...

2023-04-01.png.718b623db64ef95387b5f7c50947ccee.png

 

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38 minutes ago, Lawrence Gerald said:

"He made a great discovery but, for me, he missed the point, trying to make his finding to fit with the "1740" and "De Vere" theory."

Waugh Over.jpg

Hi Lawrence - Love the graphic. Very funny indeed. If only it were true. The guy drives me nuts!

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27 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

Hi Lawrence - Love the graphic. Very funny indeed. If only it were true. The guy drives me nuts!

Thou Standeth Before a  Mystery.

Waugh just demonstrated how he is  a FRaud and conveniently blind to who  Ben Jonson was lauding.  

He gaslights The Four Idols with his own brand of pomposity and reality distortion .  He may have more Nobleman "gas" in his tank  then  the poor Edward de Vere who  was infamously banished for letting one slip by in front of the Queen.

Oxfordians desperately need to show that Ben Jonson was in their camp and this can be seen in the disaster film "Annoymous" aka "Erroneous" by  director Roland Emmerich, who decided to fictionalize that Ben Jonson and DeVere  were collaborators. This  distortion  of the historical reality    contaminates the minds of their naive followers in order to maintain and uphold their authority as redeemers of the authorship. But all they are doing is replacing one outdated tradition with a very flawed candidate.  

We all know that Ben Jonson held the greatest esteem for Francis Bacon and his book "Discoveries" bears this out. He would not have written these remarks about his  "Chief" unless he knew him intimately while protecting the  mystery surrounding his true identity.

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1 hour ago, Lawrence Gerald said:

Thou Standeth Before a  Mystery.

Waugh just demonstrated how he is  a FRaud and conveniently blind to who  Ben Jonson was lauding.  

He gaslights The Four Idols with his own brand of pomposity and reality distortion .  He may have more Nobleman "gas" in his tank  then  the poor Edward de Vere who  was infamously banished for letting one slip by in front of the Queen.

Oxfordians desperately need to show that Ben Jonson was in their camp and this can be seen in the disaster film "Annoymous" aka "Erroneous" by  director Roland Emmerich, who decided to fictionalize that Ben Jonson and DeVere  were collaborators. This  distortion  of the historical reality    contaminates the minds of their naive followers in order to maintain and uphold their authority as redeemers of the authorship. But all they are doing is replacing one outdated tradition with a very flawed candidate.  

We all know that Ben Jonson held the greatest esteem for Francis Bacon and his book "Discoveries" bears this out. He would not have written these remarks about his  "Chief" unless he knew him intimately while protecting the  mystery surrounding his true identity.

Acid wit, well deserved!

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4 hours ago, Lawrence Gerald said:

Comedy and Tragedy are made from the same blind spot

"Dominus Verulamous cannot be Sir Francis Bacon."-Alexander Waugh

 

Anyone want to volunteer to enlighten Mr. Waugh?

B I & Bacon.jpeg

FHoa9ChXsAM39HG.jpg

I just realized that if we take in count "Dominus Verulanus" in the count of words from "one" to "Truth", "Truth" is the 33rd word.

TRUTH = 33 = BACON

😊

And here is an additionnal thought ...

I decided to use the same principle than with "Lord Bacon's Birth-day" by Ben Jonson (See my videos on the subject)

I remind you that in this poem there are 3 words in Italic Bacon Englands Genius.

image.png.69d984956d30da78a89f718c68157ad7.png

177 = WILLIAM SHAKE-SPEARE (simple cipher)

And the 3 words are placed in such a manner in the poem  that the sum of their respecting positions add also to 177.

Here ...

"One" 1st word

"Dominus" 14th word

"Author" 25th word

"Verulanus" 28th word

"Speaker" 42th word

"censorious" 64th word

One Author, Dominus Verulanus (Lord Verulan), censorious Speaker.

image.png.6a69ffd7e69fed21aad51a50206496a5.png

ONE AUTHOR = 111 = BACON (Kay cipher)

(1+25) + (14+28) + (42+64) = 26 (B.F of F. BACO simple cipher) + 42 (M.B. ?) + 106 (a reference to Francis RosiCrosse?) = 174

174 = 100 + 74 = FRANCIS WILLIAM BACON  = FRANCIS BACON TUDOR

(74 = WILLIAM = TUDOR simple cipher)

And interestingly enough ...

image.png.b88bfd7a6e184b9206a00180621b763e.png

When I have a number, I like to take a look at the corresponding pages in the First Folio.Image of page 528

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/528/?zoom=2377

Page 174 (FRANCIS WILLIAM BACON) 🙂 

And by counting 528 from the first page of "The Tempest" ...

Image of page 546

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/546/index.html%3fzoom=850.html

A very interesting page ! 😉

 

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Here are som additional thoughts ...

1806035051_2023-04-01(1).png.3e03c522332b7f57d767f4dbebedd35a.png

Without taking in count the words in the margin, and by counting each word with an hyphen as two words,

there are 177 words before the passage relative to Francis Bacon.

177 is the simple cipher of WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE or FRANCIS BACON (100) + MINERVA (77) (The Spear-Shaker).

By counting from "But", the first word of the passage relative to Bacon, the 177th word is Lord.

If we consider Lord S. Albane as One then Lord S. Albane = 177 = WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

And if we count Lord S.Albane as One there are 216 word in total.

216 = 6x6x6

Interestingly, the first time that the name Bacon appears is when Ben Jonson mentions his father Nicholas Bacon.

Nico and Bacon  are respectively the 88th and 89th words.

88+89 = 177 = WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE.

Moreover,  Elizabeth is the 100th word.

Essex is the 133rd word.

 

327945444_2023-04-01(2).png.bb146d19b4fb487030fa93d059793274.png

I think that the use of the word "Successor" has a double meaning.

Ben Jonson seems to make reference to Bacon both as the unfortunate Successor of Thomas Egerton (as Chancellor),

and as the unfortunate Successor (WIlliam Tudor) of Queen Elizabeth Tudor.

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7 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

And here is an additional thought ...

I decided to use the same principle than with "Lord Bacon's Birth-day" by Ben Jonson (See my videos on the subject)

I remind you that in this poem there are 3 words in Italic Bacon Englands Genius.

image.png.69d984956d30da78a89f718c68157ad7.png

177 = WILLIAM SHAKE-SPEARE (simple cipher)

All day today I was in a Ben/Francis world in my mind. This was the perfect icing on my day. So very perfect!!!! 🙂

 

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5 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

Here are som additional thoughts ...

Amazing.

You mentioned "Discoveries" which is a topic  on my mind that has been an open SirBacon.org window on my PC since very early this morning.

https://sirbacon.org/the-manes-verulamiana/

Ben Jonson noted this with grief in his “Discoveries:” he wrote of Bacon as:

“He who hath filled up all numbers and performed that in our tongue which may be compared or preferred either to insolent Greece or haughty Rome. In short, within his view, and about his times, were all the wits born that could honour a language or help study. Now things daily fall; wits grow downward and eloquence grows backward, so that he may be named and stand as the mark and acme of our language.”

Approaching the end of this day, I am in awe of who I hang out with and what we do. What a gift, what a rare gift it is.

We are here today, alive and breathing, and also hanging out with Francis Bacon and Ben Jonson. More and more I am learning how much Ben was part of Bacon's life and works.

Waugh brought that out. Waugh't the Hell! An Oxfartinator who is well aware that Bacon was Shakespeare spewed forth his false Ben Jonson narrative and the Light of Truth from 400 years ago is what shined through.

Yann, you are the brilliant pure Light that filtered and reflects the tiny beam of Light sent from Bacon 400 years ago that carried in on a (N)Oxious Waugh YouTube balloon filled with gas.

Ben is one of us, and we are in the same club as he. Cheers to Francis, Ben, Yann, and ALL of us! Right now, across time. 🙂

<-- 18811011881 -->

Party!!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Good evening everyone,

Facing this afternoon a commentary by Mr Stritmatter to one of my post in the last video of Mr Waugh, I had no other choice than to answer.

As I shared some of my discoveries that I had not previously shared on the forum, here is my answer

In almost all his videos, Mr Waugh repeats the importance of the following Latin sentence :
 
"Omne trium Perfectum" ... Everything that comes in Threes is perfect !

Might that mean that his last discovery is not perfect ?
Indeed, the famous 17-40 is mentionned only twice in his video, not thrice.
The Truth is I very much welcome his discovery, having found the third "1740" few years ago, and I will share it with you today.

What if 1740 did not relate to Edward de Vere but to ... Francis Bacon, Lord Verulam ?

Here are my arguments, following Mr Waugh's rule ... OMNE TRIUM PERFECTUM :


First 1740/BACON :

De Shake-speare Nostrat. : 20 letters De Augustus Hat.: 13 letters 20 + 13 = 33 = BACON

De Shake-speare Nostratim : 22 letters De Augustus Haterium : 18 letters 22 + 18 = 40 and 17 lines - 1740 (Mr Waugh's demonstration)

Second 1740/BACON :

As Mr Waugh says in the video, there are indeed 17 paragraphs and 40 margent lines by counting from "De Shake-speare Nostrat." to "Dominus Verulanus"who is none other than "Lord Verulam" i.e. FRANCIS BACON.

Third 1740/BACON (Omne trium Perfectum) :
https://archive.org/details/workesofbenjamin00jons/page/n653/mode/2up?ref=ol&view=theater

The page 102 of Discoveries (that begins with the end of the passage about "Dominus Verulanus") is in fact all about Francis BACON.

Ben Jonson sealed this page with important numbers, of which the number 33.

There are 33 lines from the top of the page to "... and is a Book.", the first block of text right before the Latin sentence.

There are 33 lines from "But his learned, and able (though unfortunate) successor" (first reference to BACON) to the bottom of the page.

If we count the number of persons named by Ben Jonson for their wit ("to take in but the Former Seculum" means that we must not take Ben Jonson's references to Julius Caesar and Horatio in count) there are 16 persons named in the text, and 17 persons named in the left margin because Bacon is named twice in the Scriptorum Catalogus : Once as Sir Francis BACON L.C.(Lord Chancellor) and once as Lord S. Albane . 16 + 17 = 33

(By the way Seculum is century that is 100 years with 100 = FRANCIS BACON simple cipher)

Moreover, in the margin, by counting from Sir Thomas Moore , Sir Francis Bacon L.C. is the 16th name, and Lord St Albans is ... the 17th.

Sir Francis Bacon, Lord S. Albane = 16 + 17 = 33

And I think, that you might get what I mean !

By counting, in the Scriptorum Catalogus, from Sir Thomas Moore, "Bacon" is, as if by magic, on the 33rd line.
And Lord St Albans is on ... the 40th line.

Thus, in the left margin, Lord S. Albane is the 17th name at the 40th line ... LORD S. ALBANE is 1740 !

But that's not all ! Ben Jonson used the "Omne trium Perfectum" adage more than once.

First "Likeness of Truth" (Discoveries - Page 101):

In the passage related to "DOMINUS VERULANUS" Ben Jonson tells us :

"For never no Imitator, ever grew up to his Author LIKENESS is alwayes on this side TRUTH".

This is a direct reference to "the likeness of Truth" he mentions page 121. Second "Likeness of Truth" (Discoveries - Page 121):

https://archive.org/details/workesofbenjamin00jons/page/n671/mode/2up?ref=ol&view=theater

"It was well noted by the late LORD ST ALBAN, that the study of words is the first distemper of learning; vain matter the second; and a third distemper is deceit, or the LIKENESS OF TRUTH: imposture held up by credulity. All these are the cobwebs of learning, and to let them grow in us is either sluttish or foolish. Nothing is more ridiculous than to make an author a dictator, as the schools have done Aristotle. The damage is infinite knowledge receives by it; for to many things a man should owe but a temporary belief, and suspension of his own judgment, not an absolute resignation of himself, or a perpetual captivity. Let Aristotle and others have their dues; but if we can make farther DISCOVERIES OF TRUTH and fitness than they, why are we envied? Let us beware, while we strive to add, we do not diminish or deface; we may improve, but not augment. By discrediting falsehood, truth grows in request."

Third "Likeness of Truth" (Horace, of the Art of Poetry Page 5 - Ben Jonson's Works - 1640) :

https://archive.org/details/workesofbenjamin00jons/page/n555/mode/2up?ref=ol&view=theater

"Maxima pars vatum, pater, & juvenes patre digni,

Decipimur specie recti :"

Most Writers, noble Sire, and either Sonne (line 33) 33 = BACON

Are, with the likenesse of the truth, undone.(line 34) 33 + 34 = 67 = FRANCIS

Notice that Ben Jonson translates "pater" (Father) by "Noble Sire" adding, as in the "Dominus Verulanus" passage, the word "noble".

"Sire" means Father, but this is also the French word for Seigneur (LORD).

So , "noble Sire" on line 33 can be a reference to : "Noble Lord BACON"

But once again , good things come in Threes !

First "Noble" / 33 (Horace, of the Art of Poetry Page 5 - Ben Jonson's Works 1640) :

"Most Writers, noble Sire, and either Sonne" (line 33) 33 = BACON

Second "Noble" /33 (Of Nobility - Francis Bacon's Essays - 1625) :

Ben Jonson added the word "noble" in order for us to understand that "Nobility" is involved.

"Of Nobility" is the 14th chapter of Francis Bacon's Essayes (The 3rd edition was published in 1625).

I did not mentionned in my answer that it leads us to page 74 of Francis Bacon's Essays (74=WILLIAM = TUDOR).

I will share with you later, my deciphering of this page.

 "It is a Reverend Thing, to see an ancient Castle or Building, not in decay; or to see a fair TIMBER TREE, sound and perfect. How much more, to behold an ancient NOBLE family, which has stood against the waves and weathers of time! For new nobility is but the act of power, but ancient nobility is the act of time. Those that are first raised to nobility, are commonly more virtuous, but less innocent, than their descendants; for there is rarely any rising, but by a commixture of good and evil arts."

To go straight to the point, I will only say that NOBLE is the 33rd word and that we have "TIMBER TREE" , that appears only once in the book, and that , as if by chance, is the word at the origin of the Title chosen by Ben Jonson : "TIMBER, or Discoveries."

"Sylvas appellabant Antiqui : Tymber-trees." (See the Introductory text in Latin of Timber, or Discoveries.)

Third "Noble"/33 (Omne trium Perfectum) :

The first reference to "Noble"/33 is in the Work of BEN JONSON and the second reference is in the Work of FRANCIS BACON.
Logically the third reference is ... in the Work of WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE !

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/500/?work=&zoom=1354

Rich. My Noble Father:

THREE times to day I holpe him to horse,

THREE times bestrid him : Thrice I led him off,

Perswaded him from any further act :


This is the final act of "Henry VI part 2" .

In the same page are mentionned " The Castle in ST. ALBONS" and "ST ALBONS Battell".

And for those who can read between the lines we have:

" ST ALBONS (battell wonne by famous Yorke,) SHALL BE ETERNIZED IN ALL AGE TO COME" .

It echoes the Latin sentence choose by Ben Jonson on p.102 of Discoveries when he talks about S. ALBANE's Book , a book :

Qui longum note scriptori porriget ævum.

( that extend througout the ages its author's fame )
 

 

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Wow Yann!

Thanks for mentioning "102" twice. I am adding the third. 😉

Waugh is not anywhere near the level your mind works. In fact, AI will have a difficult time learning how to see with the Eyes you have. LOL

🙂

Also thank you for taking time to listen to some who I cannot stomach. You are wise and indeed have a more Baconian method in your work that I can only dream of.

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13 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Wow Yann!

Thanks for mentioning "102" twice. I am adding the third. 😉

Waugh is not anywhere near the level your mind works. In fact, AI will have a difficult time learning how to see with the Eyes you have. LOL

🙂

Also thank you for taking time to listen to some who I cannot stomach. You are wise and indeed have a more Baconian method in your work that I can only dream of.

Many thanks Rob ! I must admit that each time that I mention the number 102 I have a thought for you ! 😊

In fact, when I began my travel in the world of Shakespeare's authorship I had no preconceptions. From the very start I watched videos about Bacon , De Vere and Marlowe. And from the very beginning I watched Mr Waugh's videos. His videos provide good food for thoughts and are a good way to exercice our critical thinking. Regarding his last video, I really was in awe two-thirds of the time. When I told him in my comment that his comparative analysis of the passages of Ben Jonson and "Controversias" by Seneca was brilliant, I really mean that. But facing his claim that Domini Verulanus was by no means a reference to Lord Verulam , and that the "addition" of the word "noble" in the passage was another proof that all this was about De Vere I couldn't remain silent.

This is my first answer :

Here is only one of the 32 Elegies written in 1626 after the death of "NOBILIS BACONUS".

MANES VERULAMIANI (1626) - Translation By Father William A. Sutton, S.J.  -  Elegy  9

At Threnody on the Death of the Most Illustrious and Renowned Personage, Sir Francis Bacon, Baron Verulam.

Muses pour forth your perennial waters in lamentations, and let Apollo shed tears (plentiful as the water) which even the Castalian stream contains; for neither would meagre dirges befit so great a loss, nor our moderate drops the mighty monument. The very nerve of genius, the marrow of persuasion, THE GOLDEN STREAM OF ELOQUENCE, THE PRECIOUS GEM OF CONCEALED LITERATURE, the NOBLE Bacon (ah! the relentless warp of the three sisters) has fallen by the fates. O how am I in verse like mine to commemorate you, sublime Bacon! and those glorious memorials of all the ages composed by your genius and by Minerva. With what learned, beautiful, profound matters the Great Instauration is full! With what light does it scatter the darksome moths of the ancient sages! creating from chaos a new wisdom: thus God Himself will with potent hand restore the body laid in the tomb; therefore you do not die (O Bacon !) for the Great Instauration will liberate you from death and darkness and the grave. R. C., T. C.

Elegy 8 :  In obitum NOBILISSIMI Domini Francisci Baronis Verulamii.
(On the Death of the Most Noble Lord, Francis, Baron Verulam, etc.)

Elegy 12 : In obitum NOBILISSIMI doctissimiq; viri Dom. Fran: Bacon, Baronis Verulamiensis.
(On the Death of the Most Noble and Learned Lord Francis Bacon, Baron Verulam, etc.)

Elegy 14 : In obitum NOBILISSIMI viri, Francisci Domini Verulam, Vicecomitis Sancti Albani.
(On the Death of the Most Noble Francis Lord Verulam Viscount St. Albans.)

Elegy 18 : In obitum literatissimi iuxta ac NOBILISSIMI viti Francisci Domini Verulam Vicecomitis Sancti Albani.
(On the Death of the Most Learned and Noble Francis, Lord Verulam, Viscount St. Albans.)

Elegy 24 : In Obitum illustrissimi & spectatissimi tum à literis tum à prudentia & nativa NOBILITATE viri, Dni Francisci Bacon,Vicecomitis Sti Albani.
(On the Death of the Most Illustrious Lord Francis Bacon, Viscount St. Albans, Most Distinguished troth in Letters and Wisdom, as also for Innate Nobility.)

Elegy 27 : Ad Statuam literatissimi verque NOBILISSIMI viri Dni Francisci Bacon.
(To the Statue of the Most Lettered and Noble Lord, Lord Francis Bacon.)

Elegy 30 : In obitum NOBILISSIMI viri, Francisci Baconis, olim magni Sigilli Angliae Custodis.
(On the Death of the Most Noble Francis Bacon, Sometime Keeper of the Great Seal of England.)

Elegy 31 : In Languorem diuturnum, sed mortem Inopinatam, NOBILISSIMI Domini sui, Vice-Comitis Sti Albani.
(On the Languishing Illness, But unexpected Death of His most noble Lord, Viscount St. Albans)

You say "I would only add that Lord Verulanus is repeatedly described as 'noble'." I totally agree with you.
And as you can see " Lord Verulamus" is repeatedly described as "the most noble".

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