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ANON is 67 Kaye cipher, the Simple cipher of FRANCIS. Seems like that word pops up a few times...

Interesting page, with a wealth of other hints. ūüôā

Wish I had time to share my thoughts, busy hunkering down for a strange mid-November (middle 11) Tropical Storm Nicole. Not a nightmare like Hurricane Ian, but winds predicted can make our power grid go down a few days. Hoping not!

I used to remember how many times ANON shows up on page 56, but so much clutter and chaos these days! I thought the other clues were most important! 33 Francis was the sparkle that catches our eye, but the good stuff needs further investigation.

 

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9 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

ANON is 67 Kaye cipher, the Simple cipher of FRANCIS. Seems like that word pops up a few times...

Interesting page, with a wealth of other hints. ūüôā

Wish I had time to share my thoughts, busy hunkering down for a strange mid-November (middle 11) Tropical Storm Nicole. Not a nightmare like Hurricane Ian, but winds predicted can make our power grid go down a few days. Hoping not!

I used to remember how many times ANON shows up on page 56, but so much clutter and chaos these days! I thought the other clues were most important! 33 Francis was the sparkle that catches our eye, but the good stuff needs further investigation.

 

I totally agree with you Rob (Light-of-Truth)

There are very interesting connections between the numbers and specific pages of the First Folio.

Here is, I think, the reason why some Francis are written in Italic, and some Francis are written in Roman.

image.png.b17db9a39b8084024942b80b3c06f0a0.png

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/376/index.html%3fzoom=1275.html

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/374/?zoom=1275

image.png.9d7b4bba497212e669425707c4cf15bb.png

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/348/index.html%3fzoom=1275.html

Here are some screenshots of a previous work on the related pages from my video "1623"

https://sirbacon.org/all-is-num2er/

2022-11-10.png.d23b4b1cb38e94571f4bc0ae22719aad.png

1697994525_2022-11-10(1).png.9a0d07a694f7413bde1d8f4df71b188c.png

314 is also the simple cipher of FRATERNITY OF THE ROSIE CROSS

And 314 is the Kay cipher of ...

FRANCIS ST ALBAN !

 

 

Edited by Allisnum2er
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image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

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"...what fools these mortals be!"

Being "mortal" is a false state of mind that Bacon knew so well. 400 years later he is alive with us. His dust may have settled, but he is still here. Bacon is immortal, as are we all.

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"Mortal" is a term Bacon enjoyed using, often. 154 times I see as Shakespeare.

https://www.rhymezone.com/r/ss.cgi?q=mortal&mode=k

Keyword search results:

Lord, what fools these mortals be!  a.gif A Midsummer Night's Dream: III, ii
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,  a.gif Hamlet: III, i
Your name from hence immortal life shall have,  a.gif Sonnets: LXXXI
That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,  a.gif Macbeth: I, v
Turning mortal for thy love.'  a.gif Various poetry: XVII
The genius and the mortal instruments  a.gif Julius Caesar: II, i
Yet mortal looks adore his beauty still,  a.gif Sonnets: VII
And her immortal part with angels lives.  a.gif Romeo and Juliet: V, i
With twenty mortal murders on their crowns,  a.gif Macbeth: III, iv
With these mortals on the ground.  a.gif A Midsummer Night's Dream: IV, i
Whose double tongue may with a mortal touch  a.gif King Richard II: III, ii
Till the disaster that, one mortal night,  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: V, i
Though death be poor, it ends a mortal woe.  a.gif King Richard II: II, i
This news is mortal to the queen: look down  a.gif The Winter's Tale: III, ii
This is no mortal business, nor no sound  a.gif The Tempest: I, ii
Them than mortal knowledge. when I burned in desire  a.gif Macbeth: I, v
The mortal moon hath her eclipse endured  a.gif Sonnets: CVII
The gods can have no mortal officer  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: V, iii
She sings like one immortal, and she dances  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: IV, vi
My very friend, hath got his mortal hurt  a.gif Romeo and Juliet: III, i
My sacred aunt, should by my mortal sword  a.gif Toilus and Cressida: IV, v
My reputation! I have lost the immortal part of  a.gif Othello: II, iii
My frail mortality to know itself,  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: I, i
mortal arbitrement; but nothing of the circumstance more.  a.gif Twelfth Night: III, iv
Is immortal; those that do die of it do seldom or  a.gif Antony and Cleopatra: V, ii
In thy despite shall 'scape mortality.  a.gif King Henry VI, part I: IV, vii
If not most mortal to him. but, let it come.  a.gif Coriolanus: V, iii
If my offence be of such mortal kind  a.gif Othello: III, iv
If ever mortal eyes do see them bolster  a.gif Othello: III, iii
For you a mortal mineral; which, being took,  a.gif Cymbeline: V, v
But immortality attends the former.  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: III, ii
But I return his sworn and mortal foe:  a.gif King Henry VI, part III: III, iii
But by immortal providence she's mine:  a.gif The Tempest: V, i
As any mortal body hearing it  a.gif Titus Andronicus: II, iii
Add an immortal title to your crown!  a.gif King Richard II: I, i
A tempest, which his mortal vessel tears,  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: IV, iv
Your shafts of fortune, though they hurt you mortally,  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: III, iii
You should have been put together with so mortal a  a.gif Cymbeline: I, iv
Yet I was mortally brought forth, and am  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: V, i
Would it were mortal poison, for thy sake!  a.gif King Richard III: I, ii
Would be even mortal to me.  a.gif Cymbeline: III, iv
Would all themselves laugh mortal.  a.gif Measure for Measure: II, ii
Without the assistance of a mortal hand:  a.gif King John: III, i
Who 'scapes the lurking serpent's mortal sting?  a.gif King Henry VI, part III: II, ii
When I was mortal, my anointed body  a.gif King Richard III: V, iii
What am i, sir! nay, what are you, sir? o immortal  a.gif The Taming of the Shrew: V, i
We see how mortal an unkindness is to them;  a.gif Antony and Cleopatra: I, ii
We cannot hold mortality's strong hand:  a.gif King John: IV, ii
Unless things mortal move them not at all,  a.gif Hamlet: II, ii
Tush, man, mortal men, mortal men.  a.gif King Henry IV, part I: IV, ii
Turning mortal for thy love.  a.gif Love's Labour's Lost: IV, iii
To wear our mortal state to come with her,  a.gif King Henry VIII: II, iv
To kiss this shrine, this mortal-breathing saint:  a.gif Merchant of Venice: II, vii
To death with mortal joy.  a.gif Cymbeline: V, v
To time and mortal custom. yet my heart  a.gif Macbeth: IV, i
Thy spite on mortal flies:  a.gif Cymbeline: V, iv
Thy match was mortal to him, and pure grief  a.gif Othello: V, ii
Thou must be made immortal. where's barnardine?  a.gif Measure for Measure: IV, ii
Thou hadst but power over his mortal body,  a.gif King Richard III: I, ii
Thing loves him in my despite. what mortality is!  a.gif Cymbeline: IV, i
There 's nothing serious in mortality:  a.gif Macbeth: II, iii
Their mortal natures, letting go safely by  a.gif Othello: II, i
The purest treasure mortal times afford  a.gif King Richard II: I, i
The mortal worm might make the sleep eternal;  a.gif King Henry VI, part II: III, ii
The mortal venus, the heart-blood of beauty, love's  a.gif Toilus and Cressida: III, i
The mortal gate of the city, which he painted  a.gif Coriolanus: II, ii
The mortal bugs o' the field.  a.gif Cymbeline: V, iii
The immortal jove's dead clamours counterfeit,  a.gif Othello: III, iii
The immortal gods that hear you,--spare your oaths,  a.gif Timon of Athens: IV, iii
The human mortals want their winter here;  a.gif A Midsummer Night's Dream: II, i
That make such waste in brief mortality.  a.gif King Henry V: I, ii
That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:--  a.gif Romeo and Juliet: IV, iii
That ever turn'd their eyes to mortal views!--out--  a.gif Love's Labour's Lost: V, ii
That ever turn'd their--backs--to mortal views!  a.gif Love's Labour's Lost: V, ii
That rounds the mortal temples of a king  a.gif King Richard II: III, ii
That mortal ears might hardly endure the din?  a.gif The Taming of the Shrew: I, i
Than whom no mortal so magnificent!  a.gif Love's Labour's Lost: III, i
Such mortal drugs I have; but mantua's law  a.gif Romeo and Juliet: V, i
Such harmony is in immortal souls;  a.gif Merchant of Venice: V, i
Some mortally, some slightly touch'd, some falling  a.gif Cymbeline: V, iii
So mortal that, but dip a knife in it,  a.gif Hamlet: IV, vii
Sir, she is mortal;  a.gif The Tempest: V, i
She excels each mortal thing  a.gif The Two Gentlemen of Verona: IV, ii
Or bide the mortal fortune of the field?  a.gif King Henry VI, part III: II, ii
Of mortal griefs than do thy worshippers?  a.gif King Henry V: IV, i
Of mortal breathing: seize it, if thou darest.  a.gif King Richard II: IV, i
Of bloody strokes and mortal-staring war.  a.gif King Richard III: V, iii
Of mortals that fall back to gaze on him  a.gif Romeo and Juliet: II, ii
O you immortal gods! I will not go.  a.gif Toilus and Cressida: IV, ii
O ye immortal gods!  a.gif Julius Caesar: IV, iii
O momentary grace of mortal men,  a.gif King Richard III: III, iv
No thought can think, nor tongue of mortal tell.  a.gif Love's Labour's Lost: IV, iii
No might nor greatness in mortality  a.gif Measure for Measure: III, ii
mortal wretch,  a.gif Antony and Cleopatra: V, ii
mortal revenge upon these traitorous goths,  a.gif Titus Andronicus: IV, i
mortal in nature, so is all nature in love mortal in folly.  a.gif As You Like It: II, iv
More than a mortal seeming. be not angry,  a.gif Cymbeline: I, vi
Mine eye and heart are at a mortal war  a.gif Sonnets: XLVI
Marry, the immortal part needs a physician; but  a.gif King Henry IV, part II: II, ii
Makes it soon mortal.  a.gif All's Well that Ends Well: I, i
Let me wipe it first; it smells of mortality.  a.gif King Lear: IV, vi
Lest, in her greatness, by some mortal stroke  a.gif Antony and Cleopatra: V, i
Know them from eyes of other mortals?  a.gif Toilus and Cressida: I, iii
Killing in relapse of mortality.  a.gif King Henry V: IV, iii
Is mortals' chiefest enemy.  a.gif Macbeth: III, v
Immortal longings in me: now no more  a.gif Antony and Cleopatra: V, ii
Immortal gods, I crave no pelf;  a.gif Timon of Athens: I, ii
Immortal dian!  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: V, iii
I, her frail son, amongst my brethren mortal,  a.gif King Henry VIII: III, ii
I pray thee, gentle mortal, sing again:  a.gif A Midsummer Night's Dream: III, i
I here proclaim myself thy mortal foe,  a.gif King Henry VI, part III: V, i
I'll not sleep neither: this mortal house i'll ruin,  a.gif Antony and Cleopatra: V, ii
How many years a mortal man may live.  a.gif King Henry VI, part III: II, v
Hold fast the mortal sword, and like good men  a.gif Macbeth: IV, iii
Here on my knee I beg mortality,  a.gif King Henry VI, part I: IV, v
He finished indeed his mortal act  a.gif Twelfth Night: V, i
Hail, mortal!  a.gif A Midsummer Night's Dream: III, i
For, since the mortal and intestine jars  a.gif The Comedy of Errors: I, i
For her relapse is mortal. come, come;  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: III, ii
Exposing what is mortal and unsure  a.gif Hamlet: IV, iv
Except immortal caesar, speaking of brutus  a.gif Julius Caesar: I, ii
Drive them from orleans and be immortalized.  a.gif King Henry VI, part I: I, ii
Doth win immortal fame.  a.gif King Henry V: III, ii
Could be set up against mortality.  a.gif All's Well that Ends Well: I, i
By your renouncement an immortal spirit,  a.gif Measure for Measure: I, iv
By heaven, the wonder in a mortal eye!  a.gif Love's Labour's Lost: IV, iii
But she, being mortal, of that boy did die;  a.gif A Midsummer Night's Dream: II, i
But for the stuffing,--well, we are all mortal.  a.gif Much Ado About Nothing: I, i
But sad mortality o'er-sways their power,  a.gif Sonnets: LXV
Blind sight, dead life, poor mortal living ghost,  a.gif King Richard III: IV, iv
Being a thing immortal as itself?  a.gif Hamlet: I, iv
Be not with mortal accidents opprest;  a.gif Cymbeline: V, iv
Be my last breathing in this mortal world!  a.gif King Henry VI, part II: I, ii
And, o you mortal engines, whose rude throats  a.gif Othello: III, iii
And steal immortal blessing from her lips,  a.gif Romeo and Juliet: III, iii
And I will purge thy mortal grossness so  a.gif A Midsummer Night's Dream: III, i
And he that wears the crown immortally  a.gif King Henry IV, part II: IV, v
And mortal eyes cannot endure the devil.  a.gif King Richard III: I, ii
And brass eternal slave to mortal rage;  a.gif Sonnets: LXIV
All, and he gives me the stuck in with such a mortal  a.gif Twelfth Night: III, iv
All mortal consequences have pronounced me thus:  a.gif Macbeth: V, iii
Alas, I blame you not; for you are mortal,  a.gif King Richard III: I, ii
Ah, the immortal passado! the punto reverso! the  a.gif Romeo and Juliet: II, iv
Above a mortal pitch, that struck me dead?  a.gif Sonnets: LXXXVI
A chafed lion by the mortal paw,  a.gif King John: III, i
Prunes the immortal wing and cloys his beak,  a.gif Cymbeline: V, iv
O'erbear the shores of my mortality,  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: V, i
mortality and mercy in vienna  a.gif Measure for Measure: I, i
mortality, and desperately mortal.  a.gif Measure for Measure: IV, ii
mortal, to cut it off; to cure it, easy.  a.gif Coriolanus: III, i
Foretell the ending of mortality.  a.gif King John: V, vii
Far, would have made nature immortal, and death  a.gif All's Well that Ends Well: I, i
Certainty, put myself into my mortal preparation;  a.gif All's Well that Ends Well: III, vi
Bent against caesar. if thou beest not immortal,  a.gif Julius Caesar: II, iii

154 results returned.

Edited by Light-of-Truth
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2 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

"Mortal" is a term Bacon enjoyed using, often. 154 times I see as Shakespeare.

https://www.rhymezone.com/r/ss.cgi?q=mortal&mode=k

Keyword search results:

Lord, what fools these mortals be!  a.gif A Midsummer Night's Dream: III, ii
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,  a.gif Hamlet: III, i
Your name from hence immortal life shall have,  a.gif Sonnets: LXXXI
That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,  a.gif Macbeth: I, v
Turning mortal for thy love.'  a.gif Various poetry: XVII
The genius and the mortal instruments  a.gif Julius Caesar: II, i
Yet mortal looks adore his beauty still,  a.gif Sonnets: VII
And her immortal part with angels lives.  a.gif Romeo and Juliet: V, i
With twenty mortal murders on their crowns,  a.gif Macbeth: III, iv
With these mortals on the ground.  a.gif A Midsummer Night's Dream: IV, i
Whose double tongue may with a mortal touch  a.gif King Richard II: III, ii
Till the disaster that, one mortal night,  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: V, i
Though death be poor, it ends a mortal woe.  a.gif King Richard II: II, i
This news is mortal to the queen: look down  a.gif The Winter's Tale: III, ii
This is no mortal business, nor no sound  a.gif The Tempest: I, ii
Them than mortal knowledge. when I burned in desire  a.gif Macbeth: I, v
The mortal moon hath her eclipse endured  a.gif Sonnets: CVII
The gods can have no mortal officer  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: V, iii
She sings like one immortal, and she dances  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: IV, vi
My very friend, hath got his mortal hurt  a.gif Romeo and Juliet: III, i
My sacred aunt, should by my mortal sword  a.gif Toilus and Cressida: IV, v
My reputation! I have lost the immortal part of  a.gif Othello: II, iii
My frail mortality to know itself,  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: I, i
mortal arbitrement; but nothing of the circumstance more.  a.gif Twelfth Night: III, iv
Is immortal; those that do die of it do seldom or  a.gif Antony and Cleopatra: V, ii
In thy despite shall 'scape mortality.  a.gif King Henry VI, part I: IV, vii
If not most mortal to him. but, let it come.  a.gif Coriolanus: V, iii
If my offence be of such mortal kind  a.gif Othello: III, iv
If ever mortal eyes do see them bolster  a.gif Othello: III, iii
For you a mortal mineral; which, being took,  a.gif Cymbeline: V, v
But immortality attends the former.  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: III, ii
But I return his sworn and mortal foe:  a.gif King Henry VI, part III: III, iii
But by immortal providence she's mine:  a.gif The Tempest: V, i
As any mortal body hearing it  a.gif Titus Andronicus: II, iii
Add an immortal title to your crown!  a.gif King Richard II: I, i
A tempest, which his mortal vessel tears,  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: IV, iv
Your shafts of fortune, though they hurt you mortally,  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: III, iii
You should have been put together with so mortal a  a.gif Cymbeline: I, iv
Yet I was mortally brought forth, and am  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: V, i
Would it were mortal poison, for thy sake!  a.gif King Richard III: I, ii
Would be even mortal to me.  a.gif Cymbeline: III, iv
Would all themselves laugh mortal.  a.gif Measure for Measure: II, ii
Without the assistance of a mortal hand:  a.gif King John: III, i
Who 'scapes the lurking serpent's mortal sting?  a.gif King Henry VI, part III: II, ii
When I was mortal, my anointed body  a.gif King Richard III: V, iii
What am i, sir! nay, what are you, sir? o immortal  a.gif The Taming of the Shrew: V, i
We see how mortal an unkindness is to them;  a.gif Antony and Cleopatra: I, ii
We cannot hold mortality's strong hand:  a.gif King John: IV, ii
Unless things mortal move them not at all,  a.gif Hamlet: II, ii
Tush, man, mortal men, mortal men.  a.gif King Henry IV, part I: IV, ii
Turning mortal for thy love.  a.gif Love's Labour's Lost: IV, iii
To wear our mortal state to come with her,  a.gif King Henry VIII: II, iv
To kiss this shrine, this mortal-breathing saint:  a.gif Merchant of Venice: II, vii
To death with mortal joy.  a.gif Cymbeline: V, v
To time and mortal custom. yet my heart  a.gif Macbeth: IV, i
Thy spite on mortal flies:  a.gif Cymbeline: V, iv
Thy match was mortal to him, and pure grief  a.gif Othello: V, ii
Thou must be made immortal. where's barnardine?  a.gif Measure for Measure: IV, ii
Thou hadst but power over his mortal body,  a.gif King Richard III: I, ii
Thing loves him in my despite. what mortality is!  a.gif Cymbeline: IV, i
There 's nothing serious in mortality:  a.gif Macbeth: II, iii
Their mortal natures, letting go safely by  a.gif Othello: II, i
The purest treasure mortal times afford  a.gif King Richard II: I, i
The mortal worm might make the sleep eternal;  a.gif King Henry VI, part II: III, ii
The mortal venus, the heart-blood of beauty, love's  a.gif Toilus and Cressida: III, i
The mortal gate of the city, which he painted  a.gif Coriolanus: II, ii
The mortal bugs o' the field.  a.gif Cymbeline: V, iii
The immortal jove's dead clamours counterfeit,  a.gif Othello: III, iii
The immortal gods that hear you,--spare your oaths,  a.gif Timon of Athens: IV, iii
The human mortals want their winter here;  a.gif A Midsummer Night's Dream: II, i
That make such waste in brief mortality.  a.gif King Henry V: I, ii
That living mortals, hearing them, run mad:--  a.gif Romeo and Juliet: IV, iii
That ever turn'd their eyes to mortal views!--out--  a.gif Love's Labour's Lost: V, ii
That ever turn'd their--backs--to mortal views!  a.gif Love's Labour's Lost: V, ii
That rounds the mortal temples of a king  a.gif King Richard II: III, ii
That mortal ears might hardly endure the din?  a.gif The Taming of the Shrew: I, i
Than whom no mortal so magnificent!  a.gif Love's Labour's Lost: III, i
Such mortal drugs I have; but mantua's law  a.gif Romeo and Juliet: V, i
Such harmony is in immortal souls;  a.gif Merchant of Venice: V, i
Some mortally, some slightly touch'd, some falling  a.gif Cymbeline: V, iii
So mortal that, but dip a knife in it,  a.gif Hamlet: IV, vii
Sir, she is mortal;  a.gif The Tempest: V, i
She excels each mortal thing  a.gif The Two Gentlemen of Verona: IV, ii
Or bide the mortal fortune of the field?  a.gif King Henry VI, part III: II, ii
Of mortal griefs than do thy worshippers?  a.gif King Henry V: IV, i
Of mortal breathing: seize it, if thou darest.  a.gif King Richard II: IV, i
Of bloody strokes and mortal-staring war.  a.gif King Richard III: V, iii
Of mortals that fall back to gaze on him  a.gif Romeo and Juliet: II, ii
O you immortal gods! I will not go.  a.gif Toilus and Cressida: IV, ii
O ye immortal gods!  a.gif Julius Caesar: IV, iii
O momentary grace of mortal men,  a.gif King Richard III: III, iv
No thought can think, nor tongue of mortal tell.  a.gif Love's Labour's Lost: IV, iii
No might nor greatness in mortality  a.gif Measure for Measure: III, ii
mortal wretch,  a.gif Antony and Cleopatra: V, ii
mortal revenge upon these traitorous goths,  a.gif Titus Andronicus: IV, i
mortal in nature, so is all nature in love mortal in folly.  a.gif As You Like It: II, iv
More than a mortal seeming. be not angry,  a.gif Cymbeline: I, vi
Mine eye and heart are at a mortal war  a.gif Sonnets: XLVI
Marry, the immortal part needs a physician; but  a.gif King Henry IV, part II: II, ii
Makes it soon mortal.  a.gif All's Well that Ends Well: I, i
Let me wipe it first; it smells of mortality.  a.gif King Lear: IV, vi
Lest, in her greatness, by some mortal stroke  a.gif Antony and Cleopatra: V, i
Know them from eyes of other mortals?  a.gif Toilus and Cressida: I, iii
Killing in relapse of mortality.  a.gif King Henry V: IV, iii
Is mortals' chiefest enemy.  a.gif Macbeth: III, v
Immortal longings in me: now no more  a.gif Antony and Cleopatra: V, ii
Immortal gods, I crave no pelf;  a.gif Timon of Athens: I, ii
Immortal dian!  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: V, iii
I, her frail son, amongst my brethren mortal,  a.gif King Henry VIII: III, ii
I pray thee, gentle mortal, sing again:  a.gif A Midsummer Night's Dream: III, i
I here proclaim myself thy mortal foe,  a.gif King Henry VI, part III: V, i
I'll not sleep neither: this mortal house i'll ruin,  a.gif Antony and Cleopatra: V, ii
How many years a mortal man may live.  a.gif King Henry VI, part III: II, v
Hold fast the mortal sword, and like good men  a.gif Macbeth: IV, iii
Here on my knee I beg mortality,  a.gif King Henry VI, part I: IV, v
He finished indeed his mortal act  a.gif Twelfth Night: V, i
Hail, mortal!  a.gif A Midsummer Night's Dream: III, i
For, since the mortal and intestine jars  a.gif The Comedy of Errors: I, i
For her relapse is mortal. come, come;  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: III, ii
Exposing what is mortal and unsure  a.gif Hamlet: IV, iv
Except immortal caesar, speaking of brutus  a.gif Julius Caesar: I, ii
Drive them from orleans and be immortalized.  a.gif King Henry VI, part I: I, ii
Doth win immortal fame.  a.gif King Henry V: III, ii
Could be set up against mortality.  a.gif All's Well that Ends Well: I, i
By your renouncement an immortal spirit,  a.gif Measure for Measure: I, iv
By heaven, the wonder in a mortal eye!  a.gif Love's Labour's Lost: IV, iii
But she, being mortal, of that boy did die;  a.gif A Midsummer Night's Dream: II, i
But for the stuffing,--well, we are all mortal.  a.gif Much Ado About Nothing: I, i
But sad mortality o'er-sways their power,  a.gif Sonnets: LXV
Blind sight, dead life, poor mortal living ghost,  a.gif King Richard III: IV, iv
Being a thing immortal as itself?  a.gif Hamlet: I, iv
Be not with mortal accidents opprest;  a.gif Cymbeline: V, iv
Be my last breathing in this mortal world!  a.gif King Henry VI, part II: I, ii
And, o you mortal engines, whose rude throats  a.gif Othello: III, iii
And steal immortal blessing from her lips,  a.gif Romeo and Juliet: III, iii
And I will purge thy mortal grossness so  a.gif A Midsummer Night's Dream: III, i
And he that wears the crown immortally  a.gif King Henry IV, part II: IV, v
And mortal eyes cannot endure the devil.  a.gif King Richard III: I, ii
And brass eternal slave to mortal rage;  a.gif Sonnets: LXIV
All, and he gives me the stuck in with such a mortal  a.gif Twelfth Night: III, iv
All mortal consequences have pronounced me thus:  a.gif Macbeth: V, iii
Alas, I blame you not; for you are mortal,  a.gif King Richard III: I, ii
Ah, the immortal passado! the punto reverso! the  a.gif Romeo and Juliet: II, iv
Above a mortal pitch, that struck me dead?  a.gif Sonnets: LXXXVI
A chafed lion by the mortal paw,  a.gif King John: III, i
Prunes the immortal wing and cloys his beak,  a.gif Cymbeline: V, iv
O'erbear the shores of my mortality,  a.gif Pericles, Prince of Tyre: V, i
mortality and mercy in vienna  a.gif Measure for Measure: I, i
mortality, and desperately mortal.  a.gif Measure for Measure: IV, ii
mortal, to cut it off; to cure it, easy.  a.gif Coriolanus: III, i
Foretell the ending of mortality.  a.gif King John: V, vii
Far, would have made nature immortal, and death  a.gif All's Well that Ends Well: I, i
Certainty, put myself into my mortal preparation;  a.gif All's Well that Ends Well: III, vi
Bent against caesar. if thou beest not immortal,  a.gif Julius Caesar: II, iii

154 results returned.

My goodness, Light-of-Truth! Thank you for going to such lengths and demonstrating that the word "mortal" and its derivations occur in virtually every Shakespeare play. I suppose that one should expect this from the author of "The History of Life and Death" and "Of Death". (Strangely, the word doesn't appear in the latter text.) Here are a few examples of Sir Francis Bacon's use of the term:

Who then to frail mortality shall trust - The Life of Man

22. The ages of nymphs and demons of the air, who are represented as mortal, yet as very long-lived (a thing that has been -admitted by the superstition and credulity of the ancients, and even by some in modern times), I hold to be fables and dreams, especially as they agree neither with philosophy nor religion. A History of Life and Death

the pathways of mortal life. A History of Life and Death

if balsams and the quintessences of living creatures could be received and detained in vessels, there would be good hope of immortality. A History of Life and Death

“There reigned in this land, about nineteen hundred years ago, a king, whose memory of 27 all others we most adore; not superstitiously, but as a divine instrument, though a mortal man; his name was Solamona: and we esteem him as the lawgiver of our nation. The New Atlantis

For there is nothing amongst mortal men more fair and admirable, than the chaste minds of this people. The New Atlantis

 

There must be hundreds more...ūüėĶ

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10 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

Bacon-Shakespeare on Life is a Dream

QBS61.png

Good morning, A Phoenix.

What a wonderful quote, that is on the 33rd page of the First Folio !¬†‚̧ԳŹ

If I had been a Rosicrucian in 1740, I would have probably used it in one way or another to conceal the true identity of Shake-speare.¬†ūüė䬆

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image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

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Good Morning Yann,

If we were Rosicrucians, we would have done what we know FB & the RC Brotherhood did and simultaneously  conceal & cryptically reveal that the Great One is Shakespeare all over the 1623 First Folio, as well as countless other works, during the last four hundred years.  

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

On last month's What's New page, Ross Jackson, in his rather rambling but interesting videotaped talk, makes reference to the 81st Sonnet. He interprets it as Francis Bacon addressing his literary mask, Shakespeare. Read this way, there is great poignancy in the author's realisation that his creation will long outlive him.

Or I shall live your epitaph to make
Or you survive when I in earth am rotten.
From hence your memory death cannot take,
Although in me each part will be forgotten.
Your name from hence immortal life shall have,
Though I, once gone, to all the world must die.
The Earth can yield me but a common grave,
When you entombèd in men’s eyes shall lie.
Your monument shall be my gentle verse,
Which eyes not yet created shall o’erread;
And tongues to be your being shall rehearse
When all the breathers of this world are dead.
You still shall live‚ÄĒsuch virtue hath my pen‚ÄĒ
Where breath most breathes, even in the mouths of men.
 
 
 
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1 hour ago, Eric Roberts said:

On last month's What's New page, Ross Jackson, in his rather rambling but interesting videotaped talk, makes reference to the 81st Sonnet. He interprets it as Francis Bacon addressing his literary mask, Shakespeare. Read this way, there is great poignancy in the author's realisation that his creation will long outlive him.

Or I shall live your epitaph to make
Or you survive when I in earth am rotten.
From hence your memory death cannot take,
Although in me each part will be forgotten.
Your name from hence immortal life shall have,
Though I, once gone, to all the world must die.
The Earth can yield me but a common grave,
When you entombèd in men’s eyes shall lie.
Your monument shall be my gentle verse,
Which eyes not yet created shall o’erread;
And tongues to be your being shall rehearse
When all the breathers of this world are dead.
You still shall live‚ÄĒsuch virtue hath my pen‚ÄĒ
Where breath most breathes, even in the mouths of men.
 
 
 

Ross Jackson is correct. Bacon writes to himself in the Sonnets often. If I get time I'll SHAre some thoughts about Sonnet 81. In the mean time you might notice the word "shall" a few times.

SHA for me is 1881 (S=18, H=8, A=1) and relates to time and eternity. Maybe a number that is like Janus?

<--1881-->

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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