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Quotes About Francis Bacon


A Phoenix

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14 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Francis Bacon's Over Generosity  & Indulgence to his Servants

QAB49.png

How apt: "insinuating caterpillars..." Bushell was 33 when Francis died. Lord Bacon's seal bearer, vegetarian, fisherman, hermit, mining engineer, author, soap magnate and warden of the royal mines in Wales... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Bushell_(mining_engineer)

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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6 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:
12 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:
12 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Francis Bacon's Over Generosity  & Indulgence to his Servants

QAB49.png

How apt: "insinuating caterpillars..." Bushell was only 23 when Francis died. Lord Bacon's seal bearer, vegetarian, fisherman, hermit, mining engineer, author, soap magnate and warden of the royal mines in Wales... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Bushell_(mining_engineer)

 

I suspect there are a treasure of Bacon clues in anything that Bushell left behind.

 

A Phoenix's quote is from "The First Part of Youths Errors. Written by Thomas Bushel, the superlatiue prodigall 

Bushell, Thomas, 1594-1674pp: 26-30.  (Sorry about the highlighted text.)
 
To his approued beloued Mr. Iohn Eliot Esquire.
 

...As for my selfe with shame I must ac∣quite the title, and pleade guilty; which grieues my very soule, that so matchlesse a Peere should bee lost by such insinuating caterpil∣lars, who in his owne nature scorn'de the least thought of any base, vnworthy, or ignoble act, though subiect to infirmiries, as ordain'de to the wisest: for so much I must assure you was his hatred to bribery, corruption, or symmonie, that hearing I had re∣ceiu'de the profits of first fruits for a Benefice, which his pious cha∣ritie freely gaue, presently sent to me, and being asked of his Lord∣ship, I sodainly confessed, where∣upon hee fell into so great a passi∣on, that repli'de, I was cursed in my conception, and nursed with a Tiger for deceiuing the Church, threatning I should be no longer his seruant; for that one scab'de Sheepe might infect the whole flock. Yet notwithstanding, vpon my submssion, the noblenesle of his disposition forgaue me the fact and receiu'de me into fauour; but neuer could obtaine a spirituall li∣uing afterwards: which makes me certainly beleeue they that mini∣ster'd those hellish pils of bribery, gilded them ouer, not onely at first with a shew of gratuity, or in the loue of courtesie, but waited the opportunitie of his necessitie: o∣therwise it had beene impossible to haue wrought an impression. So that by such stratagems the wi∣sest men may proue weakest a∣mongst all officers; for those whose consciences are innocent of mitigating iustice, either by bri∣bery, gratuity, friendship, fauour or courtesie, let him cast the first stone and be canoniz'd for a Saint vpon earth. But the report goeth, that it is the policy of other States, when once the subiect groanes vnder oppression, to select some man of worth for allaying clamor of the vulgar, and congratulate the giddy multitude: which if his misfortune were such, he was not the first, nor, I am confident, wilbe the last. So that in time it may re∣flect some comfort to you and o∣thers that honoured him in their hearts, but not with their lips.

 

Published three years after his master, Baron Verulam (to all appearances) died, Bushel's confession to accepting gratuities goes a long way to exonerating Bacon himself from the charges that ruined his stellar career at the Court of James I. It also contains perhaps the only documented case of Francis losing his temper, with good reason, when Bushel admits his part in his master's downfall. Bushel also tells us that he was soon forgiven for his egregious offence.

The "treasure" left to posterity by Thomas Bushel is literary rather than literal. It portrays the person who was Sir Francis Bacon as above reproach, a visionary in mineral engineering for the advancement of England, and someone who was kind and (very) generous towards his closest helpers. Some of Bacon's literary prowess seems to have rubbed off on the young Thomas Bushel, for he wrote poetry, a few plays and quite a number of books.

https://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/book/lookupname?key=Bushell%2C Thomas%2C 1594-1674

"Mr Bushel's Mineral Overtures" is only 5 pages long and worth reading if you have the time. Thank you, A Phoenix. That's another fine rabbit hole you've got me into!

 

Thomas Bushell 1628.jpeg

Mr. Bushel's mineral overtures.pdf

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10 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

A Phoenix's quote is from "The First Part of Youths Errors. Written by Thomas Bushel, the superlatiue prodigall 

Bushell, Thomas, 1594-1674pp: 26-30.  (Sorry about the highlighted text.)
 
To his approued beloued Mr. Iohn Eliot Esquire.
 

...As for my selfe with shame I must ac∣quite the title, and pleade guilty; which grieues my very soule, that so matchlesse a Peere should bee lost by such insinuating caterpil∣lars, who in his owne nature scorn'de the least thought of any base, vnworthy, or ignoble act, though subiect to infirmiries, as ordain'de to the wisest: for so much I must assure you was his hatred to bribery, corruption, or symmonie, that hearing I had re∣ceiu'de the profits of first fruits for a Benefice, which his pious cha∣ritie freely gaue, presently sent to me, and being asked of his Lord∣ship, I sodainly confessed, where∣upon hee fell into so great a passi∣on, that repli'de, I was cursed in my conception, and nursed with a Tiger for deceiuing the Church, threatning I should be no longer his seruant; for that one scab'de Sheepe might infect the whole flock. Yet notwithstanding, vpon my submssion, the noblenesle of his disposition forgaue me the fact and receiu'de me into fauour; but neuer could obtaine a spirituall li∣uing afterwards: which makes me certainly beleeue they that mini∣ster'd those hellish pils of bribery, gilded them ouer, not onely at first with a shew of gratuity, or in the loue of courtesie, but waited the opportunitie of his necessitie: o∣therwise it had beene impossible to haue wrought an impression. So that by such stratagems the wi∣sest men may proue weakest a∣mongst all officers; for those whose consciences are innocent of mitigating iustice, either by bri∣bery, gratuity, friendship, fauour or courtesie, let him cast the first stone and be canoniz'd for a Saint vpon earth. But the report goeth, that it is the policy of other States, when once the subiect groanes vnder oppression, to select some man of worth for allaying clamor of the vulgar, and congratulate the giddy multitude: which if his misfortune were such, he was not the first, nor, I am confident, wilbe the last. So that in time it may re∣flect some comfort to you and o∣thers that honoured him in their hearts, but not with their lips.

 

Published three years after his master, Baron Verulam (to all appearances) died, Bushel's confession to accepting gratuities goes a long way to exonerating Bacon himself from the charges that ruined his stellar career at the Court of James I. It also contains perhaps the only documented case of Francis losing his temper, with good reason, when Bushel admits his part in his master's downfall. Bushel also tells us that he was soon forgiven for his egregious offence.

The "treasure" left to posterity by Thomas Bushel is literary rather than literal. It portrays the person who was Sir Francis Bacon as above reproach, a visionary in mineral engineering for the advancement of England, and someone who was kind and (very) generous towards his closest helpers. Some of Bacon's literary prowess seems to have rubbed off on the young Thomas Bushel, for he wrote poetry, a few plays and quite a number of books.

https://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/book/lookupname?key=Bushell%2C Thomas%2C 1594-1674

"Mr Bushel's Mineral Overtures" is only 5 pages long and worth reading if you have the time. Thank you, A Phoenix. That's another fine rabbit hole you've got me into!

 

Thomas Bushell 1628.jpeg

Mr. Bushel's mineral overtures.pdf 176.25 kB · 0 downloads

 

It is note-worthy that Thomas Bushel withdrew from human society in 1626, aged 33, to a barren islet just off the southern tip of the Isle of Man in the Irish Sea, where he spent the best part of 3 years doing spiritual penance and (no doubt) writing his confession, "The First Part of Youth's Errors" (1628). Here's a short bird's eye view of the Calf of Man:

 

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
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59 minutes ago, Eric Roberts said:

A Phoenix's quote is from "The First Part of Youths Errors. Written by Thomas Bushel, the superlatiue prodigall 

Bushell, Thomas, 1594-1674pp: 26-30.  (Sorry about the highlighted text.)
 
To his approued beloued Mr. Iohn Eliot Esquire.
 

...As for my selfe with shame I must ac∣quite the title, and pleade guilty; which grieues my very soule, that so matchlesse a Peere should bee lost by such insinuating caterpil∣lars, who in his owne nature scorn'de the least thought of any base, vnworthy, or ignoble act, though subiect to infirmiries, as ordain'de to the wisest: for so much I must assure you was his hatred to bribery, corruption, or symmonie, that hearing I had re∣ceiu'de the profits of first fruits for a Benefice, which his pious cha∣ritie freely gaue, presently sent to me, and being asked of his Lord∣ship, I sodainly confessed, where∣upon hee fell into so great a passi∣on, that repli'de, I was cursed in my conception, and nursed with a Tiger for deceiuing the Church, threatning I should be no longer his seruant; for that one scab'de Sheepe might infect the whole flock. Yet notwithstanding, vpon my submssion, the noblenesle of his disposition forgaue me the fact and receiu'de me into fauour; but neuer could obtaine a spirituall li∣uing afterwards: which makes me certainly beleeue they that mini∣ster'd those hellish pils of bribery, gilded them ouer, not onely at first with a shew of gratuity, or in the loue of courtesie, but waited the opportunitie of his necessitie: o∣therwise it had beene impossible to haue wrought an impression. So that by such stratagems the wi∣sest men may proue weakest a∣mongst all officers; for those whose consciences are innocent of mitigating iustice, either by bri∣bery, gratuity, friendship, fauour or courtesie, let him cast the first stone and be canoniz'd for a Saint vpon earth. But the report goeth, that it is the policy of other States, when once the subiect groanes vnder oppression, to select some man of worth for allaying clamor of the vulgar, and congratulate the giddy multitude: which if his misfortune were such, he was not the first, nor, I am confident, wilbe the last. So that in time it may re∣flect some comfort to you and o∣thers that honoured him in their hearts, but not with their lips.

 

Published three years after his master, Baron Verulam (to all appearances) died, Bushel's confession to accepting gratuities goes a long way to exonerating Bacon himself from the charges that ruined his stellar career at the Court of James I. It also contains perhaps the only documented case of Francis losing his temper, with good reason, when Bushel admits his part in his master's downfall. Bushel also tells us that he was soon forgiven for his egregious offence.

The "treasure" left to posterity by Thomas Bushel is literary rather than literal. It portrays the person who was Sir Francis Bacon as above reproach, a visionary in mineral engineering for the advancement of England, and someone who was kind and (very) generous towards his closest helpers. Some of Bacon's literary prowess seems to have rubbed off on the young Thomas Bushel, for he wrote poetry, a few plays and quite a number of books.

https://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/book/lookupname?key=Bushell%2C Thomas%2C 1594-1674

"Mr Bushel's Mineral Overtures" is only 5 pages long and worth reading if you have the time. Thank you, A Phoenix. That's another fine rabbit hole you've got me into!

 

Thomas Bushell 1628.jpeg

Mr. Bushel's mineral overtures.pdf 176.25 kB · 0 downloads

Bushel was 33, not 23 in 1626. I've tried to correct this error on my part but the mistake won't go away! My apologies.

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