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The Fraudulent Friedmans


A Phoenix

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Random Friday night thoughts...

THE SHAKESPEAREAN CIPHERS EXAMINED is 777 Kaye cipher with modern 26 letter codes.

image.png.fbdbd9a32b523811aa52f22dbc4f48ee.png

777 is always a fun number. One thing quickly, is that 7x7x7 is 343.

In the Sonnets Pyramid, Day 343 begin in Line 2025 in Sonnet 145, and the first line of Day 343 is Line 2026.

http://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#Line2022

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2026 is exactly 400 years after Bacon's passing beyond the Pillars on April 9, 1626.

If you add up the first letters from line 2 through 12 on Sonnet 145, using the same modern alphabet codes (that the Friedmans would likely use), the Reverse cipher is 188.

http://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#cipherSonnet145

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188 is the Simple cipher of ETERNITY which I bring up around here now and then. There may not be a lot of attention to 188 over the centuries, but it is worth paying attention to.

188 being Reverse cipher with a number I relate to time, my thought is to look past. And Bacon "died" 400 before 2026 in 1626. The Friedmans were cipher Masters, and were hired professional liars. In their deception for the "profane" who have been eating up the Friedman lies, they left secrets of what they knew for we who see how they lie!

7+7+7 is 21. 2 and 1 is B and A.

7-7 (July 7) is Day 188.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/July_7

July 7 is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar; 177 days remain until the end of the year.

177 is Simple cipher for WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE.

Just having a little fun...

 

 

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2 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Hi A Phoenix

Thanks to you and especially Kate for these intriguing links. The video by Iona Miller is compelling. Should be seen more widely. The article about the 2014 Folger exhibition makes some interesting points.

Bill Sherman, head of research at the Victoria and Albert Museum and curator of the exhibition, explained that most of the materials in the show came from the Folger's own collection and the Library of Congress. "I found that the incredible concentration of books in codes in ciphers was astonishing. Between the Folger and the LOC across the street, they had a first edition -- at least one of each -- for every key text in that field for the first couple hundred years." This is also the first time these texts have been brought together to introduce the field of secret communication to the general public. 

While Henry Folger never set out to intentionally collect intelligence literature, Sherman said that one couldn't possibly cultivate a collection of Renaissance material without the dark arts being caught in the net. (Read about three men who actively collected intelligence material in the Fall 2014 issue of Fine Books & Collections Magazine.) "Intelligence, codes and codebreaking is an incredibly widespread field. Almost every aspect of Renaissance culture has some relationship with ciphers, whether through mathematics, language systems, postal services, or machines." Rival courts wanted to keep correspondence confidential while also intercepting and deciphering adversaries' mail, and alongside the proliferation of printing throughout Europe, espionage and intelligence gathering flourished.   

The material from the Library of Congress hails from its George Fabyan Collection. In addition to being a cryptographer who trained analysts to decipher codes during World War I, Fabyan collected seventeenth century English literature focusing on cryptology. He was also fascinated by Francis Bacon, whom he believed was the actual author of Shakespeare's works. To crack the Bacon-Shakespeare code, Fabyan founded Riverbank Laboratories in Geneva, Illinois and assembled a group of literary codebreakers to assist him. Among those people were William and Elizabeth Friedman, whom Sherman calls "The First Couple of Cryptology."  William ran the Army's Signals Intelligence Service in the 1930s, and also led the team that broke Japan's PURPLE cipher in World War II.  Elizabeth was a cryptanalyst for the US Navy and also assisted the Coast Guard to decipher the german Enigma machine. They also reinvented the science of codes and ciphers for the twentieth century,  and they drew directly from the sixteenth century materials that they had first seen at Riverbank.  These, as well as the Friedman's own publications, are on display.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

Hi A Phoenix

Thanks to you and especially Kate for these intriguing links. The video by Iona Miller is compelling. Should be seen more widely. The article about the 2014 Folger exhibition makes some interesting points.

Bill Sherman, head of research at the Victoria and Albert Museum and curator of the exhibition, explained that most of the materials in the show came from the Folger's own collection and the Library of Congress. "I found that the incredible concentration of books in codes in ciphers was astonishing. Between the Folger and the LOC across the street, they had a first edition -- at least one of each -- for every key text in that field for the first couple hundred years." This is also the first time these texts have been brought together to introduce the field of secret communication to the general public. 

While Henry Folger never set out to intentionally collect intelligence literature, Sherman said that one couldn't possibly cultivate a collection of Renaissance material without the dark arts being caught in the net. (Read about three men who actively collected intelligence material in the Fall 2014 issue of Fine Books & Collections Magazine.) "Intelligence, codes and codebreaking is an incredibly widespread field. Almost every aspect of Renaissance culture has some relationship with ciphers, whether through mathematics, language systems, postal services, or machines." Rival courts wanted to keep correspondence confidential while also intercepting and deciphering adversaries' mail, and alongside the proliferation of printing throughout Europe, espionage and intelligence gathering flourished.   

The material from the Library of Congress hails from its George Fabyan Collection. In addition to being a cryptographer who trained analysts to decipher codes during World War I, Fabyan collected seventeenth century English literature focusing on cryptology. He was also fascinated by Francis Bacon, whom he believed was the actual author of Shakespeare's works. To crack the Bacon-Shakespeare code, Fabyan founded Riverbank Laboratories in Geneva, Illinois and assembled a group of literary codebreakers to assist him. Among those people were William and Elizabeth Friedman, whom Sherman calls "The First Couple of Cryptology."  William ran the Army's Signals Intelligence Service in the 1930s, and also led the team that broke Japan's PURPLE cipher in World War II.  Elizabeth was a cryptanalyst for the US Navy and also assisted the Coast Guard to decipher the german Enigma machine. They also reinvented the science of codes and ciphers for the twentieth century,  and they drew directly from the sixteenth century materials that they had first seen at Riverbank.  These, as well as the Friedman's own publications, are on display.

 

 

Thanks for posting them up. I am pushed for time and I find that if I miss a few days and then log in here I end up spending ages catching up on all the posts and the day has gone. I will just post the short video I made about Fabyan, but I'll put it in the cipher section.

Oh I see there is a link to it above. I'll still try but it may be too large for the site.

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THE BACON BI-LITERAL CIPHER, ELIZABETH WELLS GALLUP AND US INTELLIGENCE

The fourteen page pamphlet The Greatest Work of Sir Francis Bacon published by the Riverbank Laboratories written by Captain J. A. Powell is of a great deal of interest. This work gives rise to a series of subtle deceptions perpetrated by the Friedmans designed to withhold important information about its author and his undoubted expertise in the area of codes and ciphers in general and the Baconian Bi-literal Cipher in particular. The Friedmans were very familiar with J. A. Powell from their days at Riverbank and in The Shakespearean Ciphers Examined they twice quote from the above work but only once mention his name in the text as follows ‘J. A. Powell says of this stage’.1 The same quote used in the book is also found in their manuscript on which it is basedThe Cryptologist Looks at Shakespeare’:

As one observer remarked, the cipher “came with the same effect as does a bright light to one who has lost his way in the dark night.” [Powell, J. A. The greatest work of Sir Francis Bacon. Geneva Illinois: The Riverbank Laboratories, 1916, pp. 14]. 2

In an unpublished manuscript of a lecture given by W. F. Friedman ‘A Cryptographer Looks at Literature’, he artfully employs a deceitful rhetorical device beloved by the fraudulent Friedmans, ‘To be perfectly fair’, when just about to consciously withhold information and deliberately deceive and mislead his listening audience:

To be perfectly fair, I must quote what one of Mrs. Gallup’s defenders (Powell, 1916), say on this point of the difficulty in classifying the letters.3

So why did the Friedmans in three of their published and unpublished writings want to withhold information concerning J. A. Powell, an individual about whom of course they knew their ordinary readers would have no idea who he was, or anything of his background, experience and expertise, in the art and science of codes and ciphers?

1. William F. Friedman and Elizebeth S. Friedman, The Shakespearean Ciphers Examined An Analysis Of Cryptographic Systems Used As Evidence That Some Other Author Than William Shakespeare Wrote The Plays Commonly Attributed To Him (Cambridge University Press, 1958), p. 191, see also, p. 190n1.

2. William F. Friedman and Elizebeth S. Friedman., ‘The Cryptologist Looks At Shakespeare’, Unpublished Typescript MS. Add. 215, Folger Shakespeare Library, 1955, p. 133.

3. William Friedman, ‘A Cryptographer Looks at Literature’, (William Friedman Collection, George C Marshall Research Library, Lexington, Virginia, n.d.), p. 24.

 

Paper:   https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works

Video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s

For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/  a very unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.

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CAPTAIN J.A.POWELL, WILLIAM F. FRIEDMAN AND US INTELLIGENCE

J. A. Powell was the former director of the University of Chicago Press. During his time at Riverbank, Powell worked very closely with Mr and Mrs Friedman and in order to increase their knowledge of military ciphers Captain Powell and Mr Friedman were sent by Fabyan to the Army Service School at Fort Leavenworth to attend the course in military cryptography given by Lieutenant Joseph O. Mauborgne.1

1. Bruce W. Bidewell, History of the Military Intelligence Division, Department of the Army General Staff: 1775-1941 (Maryland: University Publications of America, 1986), p. 166.

 

Paper:   https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works

Video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s

For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/  a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.

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CAPTAIN J.A.POWELL, WILLIAM F. FRIEDMAN AND US INTELLIGENCE

In 1914 Lieutenant Mauborgne achieved the first known solution of the Playfair cipher then used by British Intelligence as a field cipher. At the time the cipher was widely regarded as unsolvable. He described its solution in a nineteen page pamphlet entitled An Advanced Problem in Cryptography and its Solution issued in 1914 by Leavenworth Press at Fort Leavenworth.1 The document was the first publication on cryptology issued by the United States government. He also wrote the small six page pamphlet Data for the solution of German ciphers, also a diagram of cipher analysis published in 1917 by Leavenworth Press at Fort Leavenworth.2

In his bibliography Professor Galland states ‘The diagram is reproduced from one originally prepared by William F. Friedman, while at the Riverbank Laboratories.’3 In the first World War Mauborgne introduced the only theoretically unbreakable cipher usually known as a one-time pad cipher which due to its practical difficulties was not suitable for military use in the field and promoted the first automatic cipher machine with which the so-called unbreakable cipher was associated.4 He later became head of the Signal Corps and established the Signal Intelligence Service headed by William F. Friedman and served as the Chief Signal Officer until his retirement.

1. J. O. Mauborgne, An Advanced Problem In Cryptography And Its Solution (Port Leavenworth, Kansas: The Army Service Schools, 1914). The copy of this work held at the George C. Marshall Research Library includes the bookplate of ‘William Frederick and Elizebeth Friedman’ and signature of ‘W. F. Friedman 1926’. 

2. J. O. Mauborgne, Data For The solution Of German Ciphers, Also A Diagram Of Cipher Analysis (Port Leavenworth, Kansas: The Army Service Press, 1917).

3. Joseph S. Galland, An Historical And Analytical Bibliography Of The Literature Of Cryptology (Evanston: Northwestern University, 1945), p. 121.

4. David Kahn, The Codebreakers The Story of Secret Writing (New York: Scribner, 1967, 1996), p. 6.

 

Paper:   https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works

Video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s

For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/  a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.

 

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CAPTAIN POWELL, RIVERBANK CIPHER DEPARTMENT AND US INTELLIGENCE 

The course on military cryptography by Lieutenant Mauborgne at Leavenworth was aside from his own work mainly based on the Manual for the Solution of Military Ciphers (1916) by Parker Hitt, a Lieutenant Colonel of the Signal Corps in the U. S. Army.1 The 101 page work by Lieutenant Colonel Parker Hitt who was writes Kahn ‘the towering figure of American cryptology in those days’,2 was the first book on the general principles of cryptanalysis to appear in the United States. The manual was used as a textbook to train future cryptanalysts of the American Expeditionary Forces carried out at the Army War College in Washington under the secret auspices of MI-8 (Code and Cipher) of the Military Intelligence Division, the first official cipher bureau set up by the United States government, headed by Herbert O. Yardley and the special army training courses provided for US intelligence by the Riverbank Cipher Department delivered by Friedman, at the time the various Riverbank publications on the Bacon Bi-literal Cipher were being prepared and published.3 In 1917 Hitt was assigned to the staff of General Pershing in France as assistant to the Chief Signal Officer and when the A. E. F.’s Ist army was formed Hitt was made its first Chief Signal Officer.

1. Parker Hitt, Manual for the Solution of Military Ciphers (Port Leavenworth, Kansas: The Army Service Schools, 1916).

2. David Kahn, The Codebreakers The Story of Secret Writing (New York: Scribner, 1967, 1996), p. 321.

3. Ibid., p. 324. See also Elizebeth S. Friedman, Unpublished Autobiography, Riverbank Laboratories, Geneva, Illinois, pp. 11-12.

 

Paper:   https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works

Video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s

For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/  a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.

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CAPTAIN POWELL, RIVERBANK CIPHER DEPARTMENT AND US INTELLIGENCE 

During his time at Fort Leavenworth Captain J. A. Powell made a good impression on Lieutenant Mauborgne and his military superiors. After leaving Riverbank in December 1917 in the early part of 1918 Powell was ordered abroad to liaise with the British and French intelligence in all matters pertaining to the work of MI-8. He was instructed to learn all he could from the British and French about their cryptanalytic methods and what knowledge they possessed of enemy ciphers and codes. He sent a detailed report in February 1918 to the Chief of the Second Section, General Staff (colonel D. E. Nolan later head of US Military Intelligence) who wrote a letter on that date to Colonel Van Deman, head of US Military Intelligence, in Washington about his meeting with Captain Powell:

After conference with Captain Powell, I am satisfied that much good would result from a close liaison between the cipher section now being developed in your office and that at these headquarters. Captain Powell has looked over the situation, seen the general system of work of both the British and French, and has a clear understanding of the needs of our cipher section. One of these needs to which I wish to call special attention is that of mutual co-operation between all offices engaged in cipher work. We have arranged for keeping in touch with the British and French, but feel that much can be done in your office to better advantage than anywhere else.1

1. Theodore W. Richards, Historical Background of the Signal Security Agency (Army Security Agency, Washington DC, 1946), II, pp. 16-17.

 

Paper:   https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works

Video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s

For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/  a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.

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CAPTAIN POWELL, RIVERBANK CIPHER DEPARTMENT AND US INTELLIGENCE 

A world-class expert on codes and ciphers Captain Powell liaised closely with British and French intelligence and their cipher departments and sent back to Washington a voluminous report ‘composed almost wholly of material on cryptanalytic work’. His top secret endeavours successfully established the vital ground work for co-operation between the allies afterwards built upon by the first director of MI-8 Herbert Yardley during and after the war.1 It was this information about Captain J. A. Powell and his experience and expertise working with the French and the British military intelligence cryptanalytic departments for US intelligence that the fraudulent Friedmans did not wish to impart to their readers simply because someone of his undoubted expertise on ciphers and cryptanalysis had supported and endorsed the work of Mrs Gallup and her investigations into the Bacon Bi-literal Cipher. 

1. Theodore W. Richards, Historical Background of the Signal Security Agency (Army Security Agency, Washington DC, 1946), II, pp. 106-107.

Paper:   https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works

Video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s

For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/  a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.

KNOWLEDGE IS POWER

 

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CAPTAIN POWELL, ELIZABETH WELLS GALLUP, RIVERBANK CIPHER DEPARTMENT AND US INTELLIGENCE 

Previous to this Captain Powell had been commissioned by Fabyan to examine the work of Gallup and the Riverbank Cipher Department on the Bacon Bi-literal Cipher. Following his investigations his findings were published in The Greatest Work of Sir Francis Bacon. The name of its author written ‘J.A. Powell’ appears on the title page of the pamphlet. It commences with an introduction headed ‘The Great Work: Its Discovery’ in which Captain Powell states it is ‘To Elizabeth Wells Gallup, a deeply read student of English literature, to whom belongs the enduring credit of discovering the existence and the solution of the Baconian Biliteral Cipher’:1 She first searched for the Baconian Bi-literal Cipher in the Shakespeare First Folio:

With the principle in mind that the cipher would be found in italic type, if at all, she turned to an original copy of the 1623 Folio edition of Shakespeare. The page containing the “Prologue” to the play Troilus and Cressida, and the page containing the “Digges Poem” and the “I. M. Poem” forced themselves on her notice as being wholly in italic type (unlike most others in the volume). Further examination showed that the “Prologue” page was printed in type, some of the letters of which were obviously in two different forms. In the light of the principles she had laid down for her guidance, this page seemed to hold promising possibilities, and accordingly the “Prologue” was determined upon as the first point of attack. The wonderful instinct which, though ever held in check by rigidly scientific principles, had characterised Mrs. Gallup’s work throughout, had again led her to take the right step at this critical juncture, as later events proved.2  

1. J. A. Powell, The Greatest Work of Sir Francis Bacon Baron of Verulam Viscount St. Alban (Riverbank Laboratories, Geneva, Illinois, 1916), p. 5.

2. Ibid., p. 7.

 

Paper:   https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works

Video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s

For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/  a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.

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CAPTAIN POWELL, ELIZABETH WELLS GALLUP, RIVERBANK CIPHER DEPARTMENT AND US INTELLIGENCE 

Captain Powell describes the difficulties overcome by Mrs Gallup in her discovery of the bi-literal cipher and the methods of classification required for its decipherment. This had been made all the more difficult because in order to conceal his bi-literal cipher Bacon had used type where the minute differences were only made manifest upon careful and painstaking examination:  

It may not be amiss to add a word of comment at this point. It should be clear that in order to conceal a cipher message in a printed page by means of the use of two forms of type, the letters of each form must necessarily have such a close superficial resemblance to each other as to deceive the eye of the casual and uninformed reader, else the very object of the cipher- concealment-would obviously be defeated. If the differences were apparent to the naked eye on a casual examination, it would be an easy matter for readers familiar with Bacon’s contemporary work, in which he had promulgated both the principles and the key of the cipher, to apply the latter in deciphering the concealed message. The necessity then for the use of two forms of type, whose differences were minute, and not apparent to the casual observer, should be clear without further argument.1

                                                                                                                                               

1. J. A. Powell, The Greatest Work of Sir Francis Bacon Baron of Verulam Viscount St. Alban (Riverbank Laboratories, Geneva, Illinois, 1916), p. 8.

Paper:   https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works

Video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s

For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/  a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.

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CAPTAIN POWELL, ELIZABETH WELLS GALLUP, RIVERBANK CIPHER DEPARTMENT AND US INTELLIGENCE 

 

The pamphlet contains a demonstration of the application of the decipherment of the Prologue to Troilus and Cressida in the 1623 edition of the Shakespeare Folio. As known to those familiar with the First Folio the page is printed in italic type. Using ‘rigidly scientific principles’ Gallup proceeded to examine the page and classify the a and b form to reveal a deciphered message. The decipherment is set out letter by letter by Captain Powell in the Appendix. In addition to the plate showing the decipherment of the prologue to Troilus and Cressida Captain Powell provides further commentary to instruct and set out stage by stage the process of decipherment.

It is not exaggerating to assert that many days of labor were required to formulate the “alphabets” of the a and b form of each letter employed in the “Prologue” page. Frequently a letter would be assigned during the examination to the a or to the b form only to find that such assignment resulted in a combination which was meaningless, when the group of five to which it belonged was compared with the key. Further examination and comparison were then of course necessitated, and a redefinition of characteristics of the respective forms followed. 

One by one the difficulties-sometimes apparently almost insurmountable obstacles-were overcome; order came out of chaos, principles of form, discoverable in each letter, were found-and the long hoped-for, laboriously sought-for treasure finally showed itself to the delighted eyes of this patient prospector.

With each letter classified as to its a or its b form, the procedure of deciphering was a simple step forward. Under each letter of the original text was written the a or the b designating the form to which it belonged, and the whole was then divided off into groups of five, each such group of as and bs representing one letter as shown in Bacon’s cipher key.234

1. J. A. Powell, The Greatest Work of Sir Francis Bacon Baron of Verulam Viscount St. Alban (Riverbank Laboratories, Geneva, Illinois, 1916), pp. 8-9.

Paper:   https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works

Video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s

For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/  a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.

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15 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

It is not exaggerating to assert that many days of labor were required to formulate the “alphabets” of the a and b form of each letter employed in the “Prologue” page. Frequently a letter would be assigned during the examination to the a or to the b form only to find that such assignment resulted in a combination which was meaningless, when the group of five to which it belonged was compared with the key. Further examination and comparison were then of course necessitated, and a redefinition of characteristics of the respective forms followed. 

See the smoke?

They show the page to us. We can examine the letters ourselves. Can you see the biliteral differences? Letters are different that look the same, letters are the same that look different. Seriously, no reasonable person would ever take this on as a hobby to relax. Even among we few cipher hunters, this is being described as a most difficult task at the least. I have honestly spent some time trying and I think I see past the smoke.

15 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

One by one the difficulties-sometimes apparently almost insurmountable obstacles-were overcome; order came out of chaos, principles of form, discoverable in each letter, were found-and the long hoped-for, laboriously sought-for treasure finally showed itself to the delighted eyes of this patient prospector.

In my opinion, its not the technique, its the work that reveals a treasure. And that is what the above paragraph is referring to.

Riverbank spoke in double-talk. The first voice read as it is written is a filter to keep out almost everyone;

"OMG, it sounds so boring! My eyes could never take it! Its not for me."

All they see is smoke.

The second voice?

Seeking Bacon's treasures is not about studying each letter concentrating on barely visible clues while straining your eyes to end up with five results for every letter of a potential thought. Sure Riverbank says that has to be the way to keep most people out. But that's just smoke, yet true, in a way.

For me, the treasures reveal themselves after spending real time concentrating on barely visible clues no matter what they are. The clues may be cipher numbers, word or letter counts, maybe they are acrostics or anagrams. Could be how words and letters are arranged in print. Might be random lines or thoughts read in a new sequence. The Sonnets Pyramid design works great as one of my main tools. Concentrating on every letter may perhaps be the method for some.

Whatever your skill or interest, Bacon may speak to you or with you. Many before us have taken on specific passions and made discoveries and contributions. Many before us and some among us have felt Bacon's presence. If not while doing actual Baconian work, then in dreams or visions.

Riverbank describes methods to find treasures, and they do it in a veiled manner.

I'm so glad you have brought all this Friedman fiasco into the Light, A. Phoenix! 🙂

 

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THE FRENCH CONNECTION

In 1929 William Friedman was appointed Director of the Signal Intelligence Service which replaced the American Black Chamber (the US organisation for codes and ciphers) headed by the legendary Herbert O. Yardley, the forerunner of the Armed Forces Security Agency and National Security Agency. In his capacity as head of the American Black Chamber throughout the 1920s Yardley regularly liaised with British and French Intelligence. On one occasion Yardley travelled with Colonel Van Deman to the French Cipher Bureau in Paris armed with a letter from the French High Commission in Washington:

                                                                                                                                                                                                   

HIGH COMMISSION OF THE FRENCH REPUBLIC

The General Delegate to the

General Commission of the

    Franco-American War Affairs.

                                                                                                                                                                                           
Colonel Churchill, Chief of the Military Intelligence Division, War Department, has especially recommended to me Captain H. O. Yardley, who is being sent to France to study the different codes and ciphers used in the transmission of cables.

I would be especially obliged to you if you would facilitate the mission of Captain Yardley and put him in touch with Colonel Cartier in charge of the cipher section in the Cabinet of the Minister of War. Also with the cipher bureau of the Department of Foreign Affairs.1

1. Herbert O. Yardley, The American Black Chamber (Laguna Hills, California: Aegean Park Press, as published in 1931), p. 221.

Paper:   https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works

Video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s

For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/  a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.

HERBERT O. YARDLEY

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THE FRENCH CONNECTION

As indicated above Yardley was on his way to meet General Cartier the head of the cryptological service of the Deuxieme Bureau (G2) of the French Army Staff. During this period says Newton ‘the quality of cryptographic and cryptanalytic skills varied greatly from nation to nation. France was generally conceded to have the finest of such bureaus, and Cartier’s work was largely responsible for bringing the army’s cryptologic ability to that level.’1 Before the war Cartier wrote a memorandum on the solution of German Army cryptograms. It proved to be an important foundation and his unequalled understanding of German cryptologic methods greatly aided Cartier and his brilliant team of cryptanalysts early in the war to solve the UBCHI system used to encipher the German high Command military communications.2 The very well organized French Cipher Bureau built up under Cartier's command states Kahn was the ‘first echeloned organization in the history of cryptology’,3 one which proved invaluable in the war effort and the lasting security of the nation.

1. David Newton, Encyclopedia Of Cryptology (Oxford: ABC-CLIO, 1998), p. 44.

2. William F. Friedman and Elizebeth S. Friedman, The Shakespearean Ciphers Examined An Analysis Of Cryptographic Systems Used As Evidence That Some Other Author Than William Shakespeare Wrote The Plays Commonly Attributed To Him (Cambridge University Press, 1958), pp. 248-9; David Kahn, The Codebreakers The Story of Secret Writing (New York: Scribner, 1967, 1996), p. 304; David Newton, Encyclopedia Of Cryptology (Oxford: ABC-CLIO, 1998), p. 44.

3. David Kahn, The Codebreakers The Story of Secret Writing (New York: Scribner, 1967, 1996), p. 305.

 

Paper:   https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works

Video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s

For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/  a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.

DGSE Headquarters 141 Boulevard Mortier, Paris XX, France

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GENERAL CARTIER & FRENCH CIPHER INTELLIGENCE

As is nearly always the case the work of the cryptologist is a secret endeavour and cannot for matters of national security have attention drawn to it and the individuals involved in this sensitive area do not usually become household names. But while his name and work remains unknown to the general public General Cartier’s outstanding service to his country is known and appreciated by historians of the subject and other members of the French secret service past and present. Writing in 1954 Lt.-Col. Arnaud, head of the Cipher Section of the Secretariat of the French Armed Forces, paid glowing tribute to his outstanding contribution to cryptology and service to his country:

                                                                                                                                          
General Cartier was early attracted to cryptographic studies. From 1900 to 1912 he was Secretary and also the active member of the Commission for Military Cryptography headed successfully by Generals Penel, Berthaut and de Castelnau. In 1912 he was appointed Head of the Cipher Section at the Ministry of War, and he remained in this position until 1921.

It was during that period, and primarily during the war of 1914-1918, that his great competence and the distinguished record of the group of cryptologists inspired by him brought his name into prominence and gave him a fame which spread beyond the frontiers of France.

The name of General Cartier is destined to remain in the roll of first-rate cryptologists in the history of national and international cryptography, as much for the direction and impetus which he gave to cryptographical research as for the invaluable successes scored under his leadership.1

1. William F. Friedman and Elizebeth S. Friedman, The Shakespearean Ciphers Examined An Analysis Of Cryptographic Systems Used As Evidence That Some Other Author Than William Shakespeare Wrote The Plays Commonly Attributed To Him (Cambridge University Press, 1958), pp. 248-49.

 

Paper:   https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works

Video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s

For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/  a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.

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ELIZABETH WELLS GALLUP, THE BACON BILITERAL CIPHER, GENERAL CARTIER & FRENCH INTELLIGENCE

Sometime after the war the Riverbank Laboratories Publications on Cryptography came to the attention of General Cartier and in 1921 he went as far as to have William Friedman’s The Index of Coincidence and its Applications in Cryptography translated into French. Colonel Fabyan had the original English version printed in France and having come by a copy Cartier had it translated into French for the Cipher Bureau of the French Army under the title of Lindice de coincidence et ses applications en cryptographie. The English version, although completed in 1920, was not published until 1922, and for a long time after it was frequently wrongly assumed to have been actually written by General Cartier himself. Through his connection with Riverbank General Cartier became greatly interested in the cipher work of Mrs Gallup. In the June 1923 issue of Baconiana it is reported he actually visited Riverbank ‘General Cartier, having been impressed by the internal evidence of the alleged decipherings, lost no time in paying a visit to the Fabyan Laboratory to investigate further and judge for himself the scientific accuracy of the work.’1 General Cartier himself says:

Colonel Fabyan possesses a wonderful, rich private library of Baconian and Elizabethan literature, and he kindly put his resources at my disposal. I came to the conclusion that the cypher was the logical completion to Bacon’s scheme for the progress of scientific research, and that Bacon probably used it for the purpose he planned, viz., as a means of scientific record to hand down to posterity scientific truth that would necessarily be unintelligible to his contemporaries and dangerous to himself if published in the ordinary way. In carrying on this work, I had ample opportunity to form an unbiased judgement on the personnel of Riverbank and the character of the research they carry on under the direction of Colonel Fabyan and the stimulus of his unselfish scientific enthusiasm. And I have no hesitation in saying that the laboratory staff is competent, careful and painstaking, and the work they do is quite up to the standard of that of the best of our scientific institutes of research.2                                                          

1. Notes and Notices, Baconiana, Vol. XVII, Third Series, No. 65, June 1923, p. 147.

2. Ibid., pp. 147-48.

 

Paper:   https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works

Video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s

For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/  a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.

Colonel Fabyan

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ELIZABETH WELLS GALLUP, THE BACON BILITERAL CIPHER, GENERAL CARTIER & FRENCH INTELLIGENCE

In their book The Shakespearean Ciphers Examined the Friedmans say General Cartier never visited Riverbank. At the time of his alleged visit at the end of 1920 the Friedman’s had left Riverbank to work on codes and ciphers for the United States government. The Friedmans cited the testimony of Mrs Cora Jensen Tyzzer who was at Riverbank until Fabyan died in 1936, that Cartier never came and the Friedmans also cite Cartier’s own words in the preface to his Un Probleme de Cryptographie et dHistoire that the projected visit never took place.1

At any rate General Cartier’s contact with Riverbank and his interest in Mrs Gallup’s cipher work was discussed through correspondence with Colonel Fabyan who requested he subject her cipher findings to a thorough examination. He published his findings in a series of articles entitled ‘Un probleme d’Histoire et de cryptographie’ in Mercure de France from 1921-1923, and another article appearing in The Ladies Guild of Francis St. Alban in 1923. These articles were later collected up and republished in 1938 in a book entitled Un Probleme de Cryptographie et dHistoire.2 These works written in French and published in France have remained mostly unknown to the English speaking world and unread by an English reading audience. They are listed by Professor Galland in An Historical And Analytical Bibliography Of The Literature Of Cryptology:

Cartier Henri (General). “Un probleme d’histoire et de cryptograhie.” Mercure de France, Paris, 1921, Dec. 1, No. 563; 1922, Feb. 15, No. 568. [Studies dealing with the Bacon cipher. See also Lange et Soudart, Traite de cryptographie, pp. 37, 292-293 (“Traduction d’une inscription cryptographiée d’apres le systeme de Friderici.”) ]

“Cryptographie.” Mercure de France, Paris, March 1, 1922, No. 569 [Deals with the Bacon-Shakespeare controversy.]

“Le mystere Bacon-Shakespeare; un document nouveau.” Mercure de France, Paris, 1922: Sept. 1, No. 581, pp. 289-329: Sept. 15, No. 582, pp. 604-656. 1923: Feb. 1, No. 591, pp. 603-635; Apr. 15, No. 596, pp. 306-338; July 1, No. 601, pp. 31-57. [A series of interesting articles on the Bacon-Shakespeare controversy. The first two Nos. 581 and 582, include Bacon’s life as he tells it in the biliteral cipher, and in addition, claim to be the first publication of the entire decipherment of Bacon’s autobiography by Colonel Fabyan and Mrs. Gallup. “Chaque chapitre du texte anglais est suivi d’une analyse en francais; le dernier chapitre intitule: ‘Au dechiffreur’ a seul ete traduit integralement.” The last three articles, Nos. 591, 596 and 601, termed “Annexes,” are devoted to answering the criticisms which the first two articles occasioned. See also Lange et Soudart, Traite de cryptographie, pp.37-43, 92, 293-295 (“Extraits de la ‘Vie de Bacon’ Chiffre avec le chiffre bilitere”); Locard, “Bibliographie cryptologique,” p. 930.]

“Le chiffre de Bacon et le mystere Bacon-Shakespeare.” X Information, Bulletin mensuel politechnicien, Paris, July 1923, pp. 32-36.

Un probleme de cryptographie et dhistoire, Avec 38 documents cliches. Paris: Editions du Mercure de France, 1938. pp. 330. In-8o. [Deals with the problem of the ciphers alleged to be contained in early editions of the work of Bacon and authors contemporary with him. With “Bacon's Life as he tells it in the biliteral cypher,” extracted from The biliteral cypher of Sir Francis Bacon, by Elizabeth Wells Gallup.]

“Le systeme cryptographique de Bacon.” Mercure de France, Paris, May 1, 1939, Vol. 291, pp. 687-693.3                                                                                                                                                     

1. William F. Friedman and Elizebeth S. Friedman, The Shakespearean Ciphers Examined An Analysis Of Cryptographic Systems Used As Evidence That Some Other Author Than William Shakespeare Wrote The Plays Commonly Attributed To Him (Cambridge University Press, 1958), p. 250.

2. Ibid., p. 251.

3. Joseph S. Galland, An Historical and Analytical Bibliography of the Literature of Cryptology (Evanston, Northwestern University, 1945), pp. 37-38.

 

Paper:   https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works

Video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s

For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/  a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.

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ELIZABETH WELLS GALLUP, THE BACON BILITERAL CIPHER, GENERAL CARTIER & FRENCH INTELLIGENCE

In these articles General Cartier stated that given the difficult nature of the bi-literal cipher it was possible for the decipherer to make genuine errors and that any two decipherers were bound to disagree on a permissible number of words or phrases without it impugning the integrity of the decipherment of any given passage or text as a whole. In the articles printed in the Mercure De France having examined a number of passages General Cartier endorses the authenticity of the decipherments:

          
we think it right to insist on the fact that from the standpoint of cryptography we have personally undertaken the work of checking a considerable number of passages, and that we are of opinion that the discussion should leave on one side the cryptographical point of view, which seems to us unassailable.1

1. B. G. Theobald, ‘Mrs. Gallup’s Competence’, Baconiana, Vol. XXII, Third Series, No. 84, June 1936, pp. 125-26.

 

Paper:   https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works

Video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s

For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/  a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.

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