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Kate

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3 hours ago, Kate said:

Collar of a warrior? Not sure what that is. Can you enlighten. We did discuss somewhere in the last year how the ruff is the shape of a spade which has significant occult symbolism esp in combo with Apollo’s rays.

We’ve also discussed how certain words may or may not be concealed in some of the swirls on the doublet.

However, completely synchronistically, I just opened Twitter and the first post I was greeted with was the Droeshout portrait and I immediately noticed something on the forehead. 

Now I should just say this is far more likely to be something where someone has written on a piece of paper years ago using the folio as a base and therefore a slight indentation is showing up, rather than it being anything in the engraving itself - but you never know.

So I see a line of letters. Some of which appear to be rake or brake or even tarakenth or etarake??Take a look. I’ve used filters to try and define. Probably nothing. This portrait must surely must have been studied by experts using microscopes and modern technology multiple times.

Rob, I love the Klingon observation! 

27D36D26-3527-41AB-BA90-B1EDED61EAB6.jpeg.53315ac237bd4d9ba88b8d5a4a65656e.jpeg74222DCD-A0DD-4484-9E6F-7FA38D6EDD80.jpeg.fda325f2ca720c262b3acd7e1d5a47b5.jpeg7269FFDF-575C-412F-AF0B-1318380B6CA3.jpeg.f69de41d22ab380bc73cfb36f14b7eac.jpeg

Hi Kate. Well spotted - even if, as Rob says, it may be due to digital compression. What is certain is that, judging by the Droeshout "portrait", Shakespeare was exceptionally big headed. 🙂

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Hi Kate. I have spent many long hours studying the same things as yourself, I even see a little storm-tossed boat !

 

More to the point, here are some images I have collected which might throw a different light on the Droeshout questions. I think there was a secret group of ?men? who wore the same collar in portraits, as a kind of sign if you will. The subject in one of the portraits is unknown, some say he was Anthony Babbington, but they don't really know.

John Davies of Hereford is shown wearing one - another wielder of the mighty pen, dressed in a warrior's collar.

Sometimes I come across websites who discuss the very collar and they suggest it is not a known article of clothing, how wrong they are!

Anyway, as I asked: why did someone put "gentle Shakespeare" in warrior's garb? I think the answer lies above the Droeshout "portrait", to the right, in the last four letters of the name SHAKESPEARES, if you know your Greek mythology and get my drift: Roman Mars might help you.

Babington.jpg.fa7e285f7cdede93bf7666e612ac0091.jpg  

1359322226_john_Davieshereford.png.5a16f4627aeaa15e5f15849969158897.png

collar.jpg.308de1f6871b6404bf889a448fa0e1df.jpg

1783814531_dcoll2.png.6f0eee42bf9d2d07a84cfb159ae33af5.png

1.png.fda7111f771a999829fcc94116a99290.png

2.png.2698e0f9ebc3f09b57e89e636b7438d5.png

1467124447_dcoll3.png.1dab5549a6ad1a9f0f53489a0c26c105.png

852722864_dcoll4.png.fe492247672a764c7f45d1334cd94e01.png

 

1775491374_dcoll5.png.87f98bbae48d0006fc13d97d4216ad06.png

1410653940_dcoll6.png.33a7ad26eb111e6e3cac7663c9c757bb.png

 

1958137683_dcoll7.png.0607df8eaa1c1b78df6ec4e6d67f228d.png

 

Enjoy

 

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The man in the moone was not a buffoon

 

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In passing, wrt the Droeshout "portrait" :  6 lines of text at top, 2 lines at bottom:  6 2  :  F B.

The army images are from a book I came across with the title "De Nassaushe  wapen-handelinge...." I also had a book called "Mars his Field...." which contained many very similar images, but alas I loaned it to a 'friend', but he lost it (and I the 'friend').

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The man in the moone was not a buffoon

 

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2 hours ago, peethagoras said:

Hi Kate. I have spent many long hours studying the same things as yourself, I even see a little storm-tossed boat !

 

More to the point, here are some images I have collected which might throw a different light on the Droeshout questions. I think there was a secret group of ?men? who wore the same collar in portraits, as a kind of sign if you will. The subject in one of the portraits is unknown, some say he was Anthony Babbington, but they don't really know.

John Davies of Hereford is shown wearing one - another wielder of the mighty pen, dressed in a warrior's collar.

Sometimes I come across websites who discuss the very collar and they suggest it is not a known article of clothing, how wrong they are!

Anyway, as I asked: why did someone put "gentle Shakespeare" in warrior's garb? I think the answer lies above the Droeshout "portrait", to the right, in the last four letters of the name SHAKESPEARES, if you know your Greek mythology and get my drift: Roman Mars might help you.

Babington.jpg.fa7e285f7cdede93bf7666e612ac0091.jpg  

1359322226_john_Davieshereford.png.5a16f4627aeaa15e5f15849969158897.png

collar.jpg.308de1f6871b6404bf889a448fa0e1df.jpg

1783814531_dcoll2.png.6f0eee42bf9d2d07a84cfb159ae33af5.png

1.png.fda7111f771a999829fcc94116a99290.png

2.png.2698e0f9ebc3f09b57e89e636b7438d5.png

1467124447_dcoll3.png.1dab5549a6ad1a9f0f53489a0c26c105.png

852722864_dcoll4.png.fe492247672a764c7f45d1334cd94e01.png

 

1775491374_dcoll5.png.87f98bbae48d0006fc13d97d4216ad06.png

1410653940_dcoll6.png.33a7ad26eb111e6e3cac7663c9c757bb.png

 

1958137683_dcoll7.png.0607df8eaa1c1b78df6ec4e6d67f228d.png

 

Enjoy

 

That’s amazing! Thank you for sharing and solving the mystery! 

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 "For nothing is born without unity or without the point." amazon.com/dp/B0CLDKDPY8

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So pondering this a little more, it’s a book on weapon handling from 1618 https://wellcomecollection.org/works/aqacg7t3/items?canvas=5

and the symbolism of the (warrior-Mars) spear shaker is clear.

Can anyone read that language (German?) Does it say anything about the neckwear?

John Davies also died in 1618 but in 1610 penned the famous “To our English Terence, Mr Will. Shake-speare” (so while Shakespeare was alive).https://oxfraud.com/index.php/SL-john-hereford

But Babington also wearing one is pre 1586 and plotted to kill QE1.  It must be worth exploring more about why Droeshout would have used this ruff. Was it just to symbolise a spear shaker and ‘the pen is mightier than the sword’ or is there some other connection to uncover that might provide a link not yet explored? What was the link of John Davies to FB?  

The English Terence was in a Eulogy to FB wasn’t it? Who wrote that, I forget?  🕵🏻‍♀️😄
 

Hmm, just found a whole topic thread on The English Terence and Yann had unearthed some great info but still wondering about the ruff. DAF7F417-69FE-4D7B-92C1-72EC2DC3FF4A.jpeg.951faa67e0af7b9c8e74459dced259c6.jpeg 

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 "For nothing is born without unity or without the point." amazon.com/dp/B0CLDKDPY8

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1 hour ago, Kate said:

So pondering this a little more, it’s a book on weapon handling from 1618 https://wellcomecollection.org/works/aqacg7t3/items?canvas=5

and the symbolism of the (warrior-Mars) spear shaker is clear.

Can anyone read that language (German?) Does it say anything about the neckwear?

John Davies also died in 1618 but in 1610 penned the famous “To our English Terence, Mr Will. Shake-speare” (so while Shakespeare was alive).https://oxfraud.com/index.php/SL-john-hereford

But Babington also wearing one is pre 1586 and plotted to kill QE1.  It must be worth exploring more about why Droeshout would have used this ruff. Was it just to symbolise a spear shaker and ‘the pen is mightier than the sword’ or is there some other connection to uncover that might provide a link not yet explored? What was the link of John Davies to FB?  

The English Terence was in a Eulogy to FB wasn’t it? Who wrote that, I forget?  🕵🏻‍♀️😄
 

Hmm, just found a whole topic thread on The English Terence and Yann had unearthed some great info but still wondering about the ruff. DAF7F417-69FE-4D7B-92C1-72EC2DC3FF4A.jpeg.951faa67e0af7b9c8e74459dced259c6.jpeg 

 

1 hour ago, Kate said:

So pondering this a little more, it’s a book on weapon handling from 1618 https://wellcomecollection.org/works/aqacg7t3/items?canvas=5

and the symbolism of the (warrior-Mars) spear shaker is clear.

Can anyone read that language (German?) Does it say anything about the neckwear?

John Davies also died in 1618 but in 1610 penned the famous “To our English Terence, Mr Will. Shake-speare” (so while Shakespeare was alive).https://oxfraud.com/index.php/SL-john-hereford

But Babington also wearing one is pre 1586 and plotted to kill QE1.  It must be worth exploring more about why Droeshout would have used this ruff. Was it just to symbolise a spear shaker and ‘the pen is mightier than the sword’ or is there some other connection to uncover that might provide a link not yet explored? What was the link of John Davies to FB?  

The English Terence was in a Eulogy to FB wasn’t it? Who wrote that, I forget?  🕵🏻‍♀️😄
 

Hmm, just found a whole topic thread on The English Terence and Yann had unearthed some great info but still wondering about the ruff. DAF7F417-69FE-4D7B-92C1-72EC2DC3FF4A.jpeg.951faa67e0af7b9c8e74459dced259c6.jpeg 

Hi Kate

I, too, am intrigued by Peethagoras's observation about the "warrior's collar"/ruff in the Droeshout portrait. First, though, I decided to respond to your question about the link between John Davies and Francis Bacon - and down I went into yet another rabbit hole...

As you probably know (and as I'm just beginning to find out) there were two contemporaries of Francis Bacon by the name of John Davies - Sir John Davies (1569-1626) and John Davies of Hereford (1565-1618). Both were poets and it seems that  they both knew that Francis Bacon was also a poet.

image.png.610abdf9812f3037b320eb5d4beecc9c.png

"be kind to concealed poets" - this revealing line is from a letter written by Bacon to Sir John Davies:

image.png.860e67d2a205abb32d432f90a8054097.png

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Davies_(poet,_born_1569)

https://briefpoems.wordpress.com/tag/sir-john-davies/

https://www.luminarium.org/renlit/astraea2.htm (Not one of Sir John's best efforts, dedicated to QEI)

https://www.luminarium.org/renlit/daviebio.htm (A brief sketch of the life of Sir John Davies)

https://www.bridgemanimages.com/en-US/english-school/an-artist-illustration-from-a-work-for-none-but-angels-and-men-by-sir-john-davies-1653-litho/lithograph/asset/2660824 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

"The Scourge of Folly" written by John Davies of Hereford, has been discussed by Peter Dawkins:

https://www.fbrt.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/The-Royal-Knight-Sir-Francis-Bacon.pdf

image.jpeg.2442a1b09ed79497a838aa9258565c6f.jpeg

 

It's easy to see how Penn Leary could have been confused by two major poets named "John Davies" who were both in the orbit of Sir Francis Bacon at the same time:

https://sirbacon.org/johndavies.htm

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The ruff was a popular fashion for most of the Elizabethan and Jacobean period. It appears merely as a small cambric, holland, lawn, or lace frill at the neck in illustrations prior to 1570. After that time, particularly as a consequence of the introduction of starch into England in 1564, the ruff expanded greatly. The starch held the ruff in a particular shape and kept it from bending.9 In Ben Jonson’s The Alchemist (1610), Subtle describes a man wearing a large ruff: “He looks in that deep ruff like a head in a platter”. James Laver notes that the ruff, growing sometimes to a quarter of a yard in radius, was an article of clothing worn exclusively by gentlemen since it emphasized the fact that its wearer did not need to work. The enormous ruffs that became more common towards the end of Elizabeth’s reign may lead one to wonder how the wearer managed to eat. And yet, this article of clothing is so common in the portraits of nobles and gentry in the era that we must understand it to be common apparel of widely accepted taste. Instead of wearing a ruff (or even in addition to it), Englishmen sometimes wore collars, called bands. One could wear a falling band which folded down from the neck or a standing band that would stand out from the neck with the aid of starch. Matching ruffs or bands are often seen on sleeves in paintings from the period. By the 1630s, the band had largely replaced the ruff in English clothing. (page 17)

From a dissertation by Robert I. Lublin: 

COSTUMING THE SHAKESPEAREAN STAGE: VISUAL CODES OF REPRESENTATION IN EARLY MODERN THEATRE AND CULTURE 

https://etd.ohiolink.edu/apexprod/rws_etd/send_file/send?accession=osu1060614385&disposition=inline

 

Regarding the Droeshout portrait, the type of collar depicted is properly referred to as a standing band or "neck whisk".

See: The Burlington Magazine for Connoisseurs Vol. 29, No. 162 (Sep., 1916) pages 245-250:

https://archive.org/details/burlingtonmagazi29londuoft/page/248/mode/2up?view=theater

image.png.52d4441cfaa557b69eae2f8f9c829442.png

image.png.313d368ba7e85180c5f4c2ecaff75dea.png

image.jpeg.e78c11294537653ceb93d27773a97d5b.jpeg
image.png.289a520d35ba8b1a837b681974a4e7cc.png

Richard Sackville, 3rd Earl of Dorset, Isaac Oliver 1616

https://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O77708/richard-sackville-3rd-earl-of-portrait-miniature-oliver-isaac/

On balance, it would seem that the standing band, demi-lune collar was a more practical, less restrictive Jacobean development of the Elizabethan ruff. As Peethagoras has indicated, it was adopted as part of military dress code as can be seen in this illustration:

image.png.bae1fcd9e05f34dc5dfc1ffe4c6220c4.png

https://luna.folger.edu/luna/servlet/view/search?q=Call_Number%3D"ART+Vol.+c91"+LIMIT%3AFOLGERCM1~6~6&pgs=250&res=2&cic=FOLGERCM1~6~6&sort=MPSORTORDER1%2CCall_Number%2CCD_Title%2CImprint

However, it looks as though it originated in courtly circles and was then adapted by the military, perhaps as a nod to the fashion of the period, not the other way around. So the collar in the Droeshout "Shakespeare" portrait does not necessarily have any hidden meaning or military associations. But perhaps Peethagoras has more research on the subject?

 

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1 hour ago, Eric Roberts said:

The ruff was a popular fashion for most of the Elizabethan and Jacobean period. It appears merely as a small cambric, holland, lawn, or lace frill at the neck in illustrations prior to 1570. After that time, particularly as a consequence of the introduction of starch into England in 1564, the ruff expanded greatly. The starch held the ruff in a particular shape and kept it from bending.9 In Ben Jonson’s The Alchemist (1610), Subtle describes a man wearing a large ruff: “He looks in that deep ruff like a head in a platter”. James Laver notes that the ruff, growing sometimes to a quarter of a yard in radius, was an article of clothing worn exclusively by gentlemen since it emphasized the fact that its wearer did not need to work. The enormous ruffs that became more common towards the end of Elizabeth’s reign may lead one to wonder how the wearer managed to eat. And yet, this article of clothing is so common in the portraits of nobles and gentry in the era that we must understand it to be common apparel of widely accepted taste. Instead of wearing a ruff (or even in addition to it), Englishmen sometimes wore collars, called bands. One could wear a falling band which folded down from the neck or a standing band that would stand out from the neck with the aid of starch. Matching ruffs or bands are often seen on sleeves in paintings from the period. By the 1630s, the band had largely replaced the ruff in English clothing. (page 17)

From a dissertation by Robert I. Lublin: 

COSTUMING THE SHAKESPEAREAN STAGE: VISUAL CODES OF REPRESENTATION IN EARLY MODERN THEATRE AND CULTURE 

https://etd.ohiolink.edu/apexprod/rws_etd/send_file/send?accession=osu1060614385&disposition=inline

 

Regarding the Droeshout portrait, the type of collar depicted is properly referred to as a standing band or "neck whisk".

See: The Burlington Magazine for Connoisseurs Vol. 29, No. 162 (Sep., 1916) pages 245-250:

https://archive.org/details/burlingtonmagazi29londuoft/page/248/mode/2up?view=theater

image.png.52d4441cfaa557b69eae2f8f9c829442.png

image.png.313d368ba7e85180c5f4c2ecaff75dea.png

image.jpeg.e78c11294537653ceb93d27773a97d5b.jpeg
image.png.289a520d35ba8b1a837b681974a4e7cc.png

Richard Sackville, 3rd Earl of Dorset, Isaac Oliver 1616

https://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O77708/richard-sackville-3rd-earl-of-portrait-miniature-oliver-isaac/

On balance, it would seem that the standing band, demi-lune collar was a more practical, less restrictive Jacobean development of the Elizabethan ruff. As Peethagoras has indicated, it was adopted as part of military dress code as can be seen in this illustration:

image.png.bae1fcd9e05f34dc5dfc1ffe4c6220c4.png

https://luna.folger.edu/luna/servlet/view/search?q=Call_Number%3D"ART+Vol.+c91"+LIMIT%3AFOLGERCM1~6~6&pgs=250&res=2&cic=FOLGERCM1~6~6&sort=MPSORTORDER1%2CCall_Number%2CCD_Title%2CImprint

However, it looks as though it originated in courtly circles and was then adapted by the military, perhaps as a nod to the fashion of the period, not the other way around. So the collar in the Droeshout "Shakespeare" portrait does not necessarily have any hidden meaning or military associations. But perhaps Peethagoras has more research on the subject?

 

Fascinating! Thank you for researching this 

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 "For nothing is born without unity or without the point." amazon.com/dp/B0CLDKDPY8

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The collar is an important arc suggestion in the Droeshout portrait.

spacer.png

The arc of the collar is centered at E. It intersects the circle which contains the image at C and D here, giving CD perpendicular to GF. This is the line of the button hem. Point G is part of an angle AGB that is 80 degrees. AGF and BGF are 40 degrees. The arc of the collar created on its circle is about 48 degrees or 1/7.5 th of the circle. If one does the math it is what is required for the 40,60,80 triangle to come out of the top (shown elsewhere previously). The collar ends up being a clever design element in the composition and worthy of consideration.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/9/2023 at 11:20 AM, RoyalCraftiness said:

The collar is an important arc suggestion in the Droeshout portrait.

spacer.png

The arc of the collar is centered at E. It intersects the circle which contains the image at C and D here, giving CD perpendicular to GF. This is the line of the button hem. Point G is part of an angle AGB that is 80 degrees. AGF and BGF are 40 degrees. The arc of the collar created on its circle is about 48 degrees or 1/7.5 th of the circle. If one does the math it is what is required for the 40,60,80 triangle to come out of the top (shown elsewhere previously). The collar ends up being a clever design element in the composition and worthy of consideration.

I missed this when it posted. I have too much going on in my life! LOL

There are more than just AGF and BFG that are interesting and 40, 60, 80 degrees add up to 180 and are impressive. Every triangle adds up to 180, right? I wonder what CGF and DGF are?

I would bet that Willy of Avon was not the face in Shakespeare's engraving. I'd be surprised if what he looked like would even be recognizable based on his images after he was dead.

Yet this engraving has a lot to share about Shakespeare and his purpose, and who he was. 😉

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
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On 3/20/2023 at 5:59 PM, Light-of-Truth said:

I missed this when it posted. I have too much going on in my life! LOL

There are more than just AGF and BFG that are interesting and 40, 60, 80 degrees add up to 180 and are impressive. Every triangle adds up to 180, right? I wonder what CGF and DGF are?

I would bet that Willy of Avon was not the face in Shakespeare's engraving. I'd be surprised if what he looked like would even be recognizable based on his images after he was dead.

Yet this engraving has a lot to share about Shakespeare and his purpose, and who he was. 😉

 

I don't know who designed this before it was executed and put to paper. We are given only the name of the engraver. I don' t know who the likeness is supposed to represent. I don't think it's main function is to present a very good likeness. It appears to have been more important that the features be guided by the geometric composition that may have been handed to an engraver.as a starting point. What got produced is something rather stiff and cartoonish. Altrnatively you could suggest that the engraver did this on his own.

The geometric feature with the most obvious intent is the positioning of the 80,60,40 triangle. It's center is also the center of the rectangle which contains the image. That tells you it was engineered to be that way. It is elegant enough that it was made to come out, but to have it be concentric means it was likely started with.  That's about all I have to say about it. This we can show. The point of it is another story. 

The main composition is guided by a geometric idea for what Bacon and Brahe accepted as the cosmology of our solar system. It was an improvement over Ptolemy's system of epicenters, but it is still wrong. I doubt that Shakespeare would have had any opinion about that, but he could have.  I don't know why anyone would have wanted to show that even if WS did hold that belief. It appears to me to be the idea of someone still living who has a hand in the production of the folio, and of someone who had an acute interest in the Summer triangle asterism. As you know, I feel we are well within our abilities to show that Bacon imagery was utilizing this triangular asterism as a celestial beacon in other places. I also think he used Triangulum.  I feel we can show that someone was suggesting the use of this pairing.  It's never more suggested than in Sylva Sylvarum, a work that was Bacon's Swan Song. What it all means is something I can only speculate about. If something is detectable and elegant, does it have a meaning? It must have had a meaning to someone. 

 

 

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  • 2 months later...
6 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

If anyone has the time and inclination, the author has concealed a name in his dedication below. Can anyone figure it out? 

 

image.png.5f709dc007cb1ac5c5df0b1d757145e9.png

Hi Eric,

I do not know if this is the answer .

This is just my first thought.

I wonder if William Stone Booth, Author and Editor, would have been able, just for fun, to write a Dedication to himself.

"The man to whose generous courage I am indebted"

Notice the name "of", the publication "of" , from end to end "of".

image.png.e2174859707777ca480a755db291d123.png

WILLIAM STONE BOOTH

EDIT :

image.png.bcb987b6c17b937afb43251eba524624.png

 

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  • 6 months later...

Based on the great work of A Phoenix on "Dr Panurgus", an engraving by Martin Droeshout, here are the fruits of my last investigations on the Droeshout's Portrait, linked with the work of Peethagoras on the "Soldier's collar".

image.png.47597401cd6d43f54877a9b21f7378cc.png

Facing the fact that a part of Martin Doeshout's engraving "Dr Panurgus" was based on a previous engraving  of Frances Carr, Countess of Somerset by Simon de Passe, I wondered if Shakespeare's Portrait could have been based on another engraving by Simon van de Passe.

image.png.433643e658cddbd861fd67393e41af55.png

Peethagoras, few month ago, shared with us his work on the Soldier's collar.

Here is an engraving by Simon van de Passe of John Smith with the same type of Collar.

This one was engraved in 1616, the year of Shakespeare's death.

Under the engraving of John Smith we have some "Lines" written by John Davies of Hereford, mentioned by Peethagoras in his las post.

image.png.e12bfb3b82be7b57b41ca9a11aadabab.png

The original engraving of John Smith appears in a map of New England engraved by Simon van de Passe in 1616.

And what a surprise in the map that can be found in the German edition of Smith's 'A Description of New England' published in 1617 ( 16 + 17 = 33).

image.png.f9fbea029af98385b704db974b94c5a6.png

The german word for "Portrait(ure)" was "ABCONTRAFACTUR"

SHAKESPEARE'S ABCONTRAFACTUR.

image.png.af8fae2b0f8e47e75d032edc0322b272.png

To be continued ...

 

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image.png.cd074f6b8f67b855aa0a883f7911f255.png

THESE ARE THE LINES ...

image.png.a7580f48cae315f6d74f1f8bbac30b0d.png

Interestingly, if we draw a line with a 33° angle starting from the center of the Compass, the line ends on the first word "These" and crosses the word "Acts" and the "hamlet" of "Southampton".

I am not sure but it seems that the distance between the center of the Compass and the word "Acts" by using the scale is ... 33 (BACON).

If we draw a line with a 67° angle , the line points to the word "Prince" ... PRINCE FRANCIS (67) ?

Notice that the 33° Line crosses CAP ANNA, named after Anne of Denmark , the mother of Prince Charles I.

I wonder if it could be a hidden reference to Hamlet "Prince of Denmark".

Notice that if we draw a line with an angle of 50° (the middle between 33° and 67°), this line crosses the name "Smith" and his portarait but also the head of the horseman (wearing a hat) and the line points to spearmen on the top left of the engraving.

Here is a very interesting essay ...

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/233609159_The_Anglophone_Toponyms_Associated_with_John_Smith's_Description_and_Map_of_New_England

Regarding "Cap Anna" ...

The Appendix mentionned the "old" toponyms recorded in Smith's Description of New England.

"Turks Heads [26, 28], 3 Turkse Hoofden [Aa]. Smith’s name for the islands off Cape

Ann referenced the three Turkish warriors he had defeated in single combat during the

relief of Vienna, as symbolized on his claimed coat of arms. Lenney (2003: 25) sug-

gested a further dimension for “Turks Heads” within the common naming practices of

English taverns and inns."

image.png.f986f593f0d3455ec00ea020c6f91556.png

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/47/Description_of_New_England_-_Smith_(1616)_-_map.png

To be continued ...

 

 

 

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Description_of_New_England_-_Smith_(1616

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/47/Description_of_New_England_-_Smith_(1616)_-_map.png

image.png.6506510d3f19eacd5b73a8bbb77d7223.png

I noticed kind of an alignement allowing to hide F. BACON.

For the sake of transparency (and because in any case it would jump at the eyes of any oxfordian), if we extend this line we can find "Oxford" and "vere" ( in vivere at the end of John's Smith's motto ).

image.png.9a843620fab04014999ae676cdf00e83.png

Interestingly enough, this line is parallel to the following one ...

image.png.3ead0330809d34ce0c20b0ef131c1248.png

... that crosses " Smith", 'Davies", "Cape Anna"(Turks Heads) and G(e)orge (St George?)

To conclude, here is a link to the 1635 Edition of John Smith's map of New England, with "Prince Charles , nowe King of Great Britaine".

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/first-map-of-new-england

Notice that the Fullerton Ils are renowned "Franncis" ils.

 

 

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19 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

Based on the great work of A Phoenix on "Dr Panurgus", an engraving by Martin Droeshout, here are the fruits of my last investigations on the Droeshout's Portrait, linked with the work of Peethagoras on the "Soldier's collar".

image.png.47597401cd6d43f54877a9b21f7378cc.png

Facing the fact that a part of Martin Doeshout's engraving "Dr Panurgus" was based on a previous engraving  of Frances Carr, Countess of Somerset by Simon de Passe, I wondered if Shakespeare's Portrait could have been based on another engraving by Simon van de Passe.

image.png.433643e658cddbd861fd67393e41af55.png

Peethagoras, few month ago, shared with us his work on the Soldier's collar.

Here is an engraving by Simon van de Passe of John Smith with the same type of Collar.

This one was engraved in 1616, the year of Shakespeare's death.

Under the engraving of John Smith we have some "Lines" written by John Davies of Hereford, mentioned by Peethagoras in his las post.

image.png.e12bfb3b82be7b57b41ca9a11aadabab.png

The original engraving of John Smith appears in a map of New England engraved by Simon van de Passe in 1616.

And what a surprise in the map that can be found in the German edition of Smith's 'A Description of New England' published in 1617 ( 16 + 17 = 33).

image.png.f9fbea029af98385b704db974b94c5a6.png

The german word for "Portrait(ure)" was "ABCONTRAFACTUR"

SHAKESPEARE'S ABCONTRAFACTUR.

image.png.af8fae2b0f8e47e75d032edc0322b272.png

To be continued ...

 

Hi Yann. Beautiful work you are doing. A completely new angle on Droeshout's "Shakespeare". 

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19 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

image.png.cd074f6b8f67b855aa0a883f7911f255.png

THESE ARE THE LINES ...

image.png.a7580f48cae315f6d74f1f8bbac30b0d.png

Interestingly, if we draw a line with a 33° angle starting from the center of the Compass, the line ends on the first word "These" and crosses the word "Acts" and the "hamlet" of "Southampton".

I am not sure but it seems that the distance between the center of the Compass and the word "Acts" by using the scale is ... 33 (BACON).

If we draw a line with a 67° angle , the line points to the word "Prince" ... PRINCE FRANCIS (67) ?

Notice that the 33° Line crosses CAP ANNA, named after Anne of Denmark , the mother of Prince Charles I.

I wonder if it could be a hidden reference to Hamlet "Prince of Denmark".

Notice that if we draw a line with an angle of 50° (the middle between 33° and 67°), this line crosses the name "Smith" and his portarait but also the head of the horseman (wearing a hat) and the line points to spearmen on the top left of the engraving.

Here is a very interesting essay ...

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/233609159_The_Anglophone_Toponyms_Associated_with_John_Smith's_Description_and_Map_of_New_England

Regarding "Cap Anna" ...

The Appendix mentionned the "old" toponyms recorded in Smith's Description of New England.

"Turks Heads [26, 28], 3 Turkse Hoofden [Aa]. Smith’s name for the islands off Cape

Ann referenced the three Turkish warriors he had defeated in single combat during the

relief of Vienna, as symbolized on his claimed coat of arms. Lenney (2003: 25) sug-

gested a further dimension for “Turks Heads” within the common naming practices of

English taverns and inns."

image.png.f986f593f0d3455ec00ea020c6f91556.png

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/47/Description_of_New_England_-_Smith_(1616)_-_map.png

To be continued ...

 

 

 

Very enlightening!

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5 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

Hi Yann. Beautiful work you are doing. A completely new angle on Droeshout's "Shakespeare". 

Many thanks Eric ! ❤️

I'm glad you like this new angle.

I forgot to mention that the 1631 engraving of John Davies of Hereford (1565-1618) is based on a lost Portrait by Rowland Lockey who died in 1616 which means that this lost Portrait was painted before 1616.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rowland_Lockey

And here is another engraving to which, I think, the Droeshout Portrait refers to ...

image.png.c18bccc9f22a9f0c09fbf388860457dd.png

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Daniel_Mylius#/media/Fichier:Johannes_Daniel_Mylius._Line_engraving,_1620._Wellcome_V0004207.jpg

Johannes Daniel Mylius , 33 years old in 1618.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Daniel_Mylius

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3 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

Many thanks Eric ! ❤️

I'm glad you like this new angle.

I forgot to mention that the 1631 engraving of John Davies of Hereford (1565-1618) is based on a lost Portrait by Rowland Lockey who died in 1616 which means that this lost Portrait was painted before 1616.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rowland_Lockey

And here is another engraving to which, I think, the Droeshout Portrait refers to ...

image.png.c18bccc9f22a9f0c09fbf388860457dd.png

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Daniel_Mylius#/media/Fichier:Johannes_Daniel_Mylius._Line_engraving,_1620._Wellcome_V0004207.jpg

Johannes Daniel Mylius , 33 years old in 1618.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johann_Daniel_Mylius

Do you think Bacon was ideologically aligned with these Indian Killers? The fawning in the block of text does show how abjectly immoral these men were and what ignoble piety guided them. They were not in the business of civilizing anyone unless that means killing native Catholic coverts (at this time there was already a well established amicable relationship between the natives and the French). They were proud Protestant ethnic cleansers and that very thing was repeatedly displayed in British colonial history in these parts and in Nova Scotia.  It's unclear to me what Bacon thought of this business. He is said to have defended King James' treatment of the natives in New England. Roger William's colony at Rhode Island (1636), shown at the bottom of the chart, was a place where the practice of "civilizing" natives was not condoned. Williams was critical of Bacon for  having defended James' treatment of natives. It wasn't just the "salvages" either.  There has been clear lines in the sand with Puritans also. Williams' colony was open and religiously tolerant (almost unique). In many other regards Williams has a lot of regard for Bacon's use of reason.

One thing that stands out about the Freemasons in Colonial NA is that they had a certain blood lust. Whatever was discussed in their regimental lodges was open to extreme violence. Again. I'm nor sure that this is in Bacon's ideology. Similarly, it doesn't align with any Rosicrucian values that I know of (think of non interference). King James was definitely that  type of brute, though, having burned many a man's wife to spite them.

Whatever we think of the NA project. It was not an enlightened one in our modern values. It was one to raise the fortunes of England, and probably of the Anglican vision of Holy Royal Arch.

There are a lot of men who have put Bacon on a pedestal since that  time, but it is unclear to me if he would have reciprocated.

There's a neat TTT top left acrostic to the text. 

I'd consider what Great Circle Line might also being referenced in the positioning of the colonies of the New Jerusalem. The lines seem to be referring to alignments, and to the actions as aligning with good Christian values.

Were place names given so that their first letters would form a word suggestion when aligned? That sounds like a fishing expedition. It couldn't realistically have occurred like that.

What does the 40 degree heading produce?

Edited by RoyalCraftiness
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