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Shakespeare’s Monument


Kate

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2 hours ago, Kate said:

My tweet about handwriting has had 9000 + views, signalling that this is the type of info people are interested in. It also shows how on Twitter it’s all about exponential growth - if people RT it gets seen by all their followers and they RT and so it grows. Very happy that it’s turning some new people on to SirBacon.org.

Re the above triple pic, I suddenly realised how, because there was once no window behind the monument, it is likely those windows will be of particular significance. Has anyone written about them. Are they the Seven Ages of Man windows? 
 

Also, like most in here I know the story about how the Dugdale sketch of 1624 was turned into an engraving by Holler and the illustration printed in 1656, and then the monument was updated (in the 1700s?)but what is the best source of reliable info as to why it looks so different? Thanks 🙏 

Hi Kate

No luck in finding a good shot of the windows behind the monument. And no idea when the windows were installed. The Seven Ages windows appear to be NOT directly behind and above the monument, but further to the left (?). This article was all I could find: http://theshakespeareblog.com/2014/08/holy-trinitys-american-tributes-to-shakespeare-in-glass/

image.jpeg.44ba1cd5b321570970b50e8edb4cea23.jpeg

But as you can see, these are different to the "Shakespeare" windows:

image.jpeg.bc07b67c57b483040e64208bece3769c.jpeg

The information about these windows must be there somewhere...

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Handwriting

The handwriting of Francis Bacon on the outer cover of the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript (formerly known as the Northumberland Manuscript) which originally contained his two Shakespeare plays Richard II and Richard III.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Handwriting #Rosicrucians #Freemasons

W1.png

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3 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

Handwriting

The handwriting of Francis Bacon on the outer cover of the Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript (formerly known as the Northumberland Manuscript) which originally contained his two Shakespeare plays Richard II and Richard III.

#FrancisBacon #Shakespeare #Handwriting #Rosicrucians #Freemasons

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A tour de force, A.P. You bring clarity to complexity. I can't help but feel inspired by the purposefulness of the writing.

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1 hour ago, A Phoenix said:

Francis Bacon's Handwriting

Francis Bacon’s private notebook written in his own hand - a source for hundreds of resemblances, correspondences and parallels found throughout his Shakespeare works.

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/95355522/Francis_Bacons_Private_Manuscript_Notebook_Known_as_the_Promus_of_Formularies_and_Elegancies_The_Source_of_Several_Hundred_Resemblances_Correspondences_and_Parallels_Found_Throughout_his_Shakespeare_Poems_and_Plays

Video: https://youtu.be/LTfUbKb7KqU

PROMUS 3.png

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PROMUS 5.png

https://archive.org/details/promusofformular00pott/page/n1/mode/2up

image.png.b200ccbff61e79313c7924b0d56b41be.png

 

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59 minutes ago, A Phoenix said:

1 Minute Promus Trailer

Francis Bacon’s private notebook written in his own hand - a source for hundreds of resemblances, correspondences and parallels found throughout his Shakespeare works.

Paper: https://www.academia.edu/95355522/Francis_Bacons_Private_Manuscript_Notebook_Known_as_the_Promus_of_Formularies_and_Elegancies_The_Source_of_Several_Hundred_Resemblances_Correspondences_and_Parallels_Found_Throughout_his_Shakespeare_Poems_and_Plays

Video: https://youtu.be/LTfUbKb7KqU

Sad to say, the Phoenixes' Promus promo isn't playing back on my laptop (?). Problem could be at my end.

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  • 7 months later...

Hi everyone,

I would like to share with you something that I found this morning by "error".

I was looking for something in the First Folio that I deciphered few years ago, and I remembered that it was on a leaf in relation with one of the "Fra Rosi Crosse" ciphers.

I chose the wrong one and it led me to page 574 of the First Folio that is on the 287th leaf.

287 = FRA ROSI CROSS (Kay cipher).

Once again, this could be something that has already been disovered, but just in case, I share it with you.

image.png.5a17b5a1aa527252037bd19beeb472b5.png

I immediatly thought about Shakespeare's Monument ...

scroll.jpg

https://sirbacon.org/gallery/west.htm

We know that the number of letters adds to 157 = FRA ROSI CROSSE (simple cipher).

"his finger on his Temple(s)" is a reference to the 287th leaf of the First Folio.

287 = FRA ROSI CROSSE (Kay cipher)

Ang guess what ?

"Finger" is the 33rd word of this passage 😉 

image.png.ceec1b7d5771fc9f90874d6a263627f0.png

Joy 😊

EDIT 1 :

Interestingly enough, there are 68 words in total in this passage.

It gives us 67 words + the 33rd one that is "finger"

FRANCIS BACON

Please note that in this case I am not sure that it was intended by Bacon/Shakespeare but it could have been the reason of the choice made by the persons behind the making of Shakespeare's Monument in 1740.

 

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9 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

"Finger" is the 33rd word of this passage 😉 

Following your lead, but maybe this is just a coincidence, the "The solemne Temples, the great Globe it selfe," page is numbered 33 in the URL and index:

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/33/index.htmlzoom=850.html

image.png.c707d2e862e37792a2cdb9f12a339ad0.png

Exactly 100 lines after the "Temples" line we see, "Monster, lay to your fingers:"

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/34/?work=tmp&zoom=850

image.png.cdea521d115870e7af3e041ea0a3d0d3.png

I'm still trying to make some sense, but getting veerrrry sleepy. 🙂

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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16 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Following your lead, but maybe this is just a coincidence, the "The solemne Temples, the great Globe it selfe," page is numbered 33

Hi Rob,

Great finding !❤️

And for me , this is not a coincidence. 😊

Here are two slides from my video "Mediocria firma".

2023-07-30(10).png.55429ec8b532882c27440144f7aafed6.png

Notice, that if at the end of "The Tempest" we have "Free", at the end of the left column , we have " I, Francis " ( or Francis I) on the right column with the F of FINIS and the S of "Spirits".

And all the Spirits are gathered on one page ... the 33rd page of the First Folio.

2023-07-30(12).png.579e56c3c6be90f1829548be88639d6e.png

Thus, I think that this passage was chosen judiciously because it was on the 33rd page of the First Folio,.

It was rearranged for many reasons, one of them being to have 157 letters in total (Fra Rosi Crosse simple cipher).

And now, I think that Shakespeare pointing to "Temples" is a reference to leaf 287 for the reasons explained previously.

The fact that "lay his fingers" can be found 100 lines further "Solemne Temples" is very interesting and, I think, another great finding, especially since the passage mentions a "Hogshead of wine" and that the Roman God of Wine was ...

BACCO ! 😉 

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4 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

...

Thus, I think that this passage was chosen judiciously because it was on the 33rd page of the First Folio,.

It was rearranged for many reasons, one of them being to have 157 letters in total (Fra Rosi Crosse simple cipher).

And now, I think that Shakespeare pointing to "Temples" is a reference to leaf 287 for the reasons explained previously.

The fact that "lay his fingers" can be found 100 lines further "Solemne Temples" is very interesting and, I think, another great finding, especially since the passage mentions a "Hogshead of wine" and that the Roman God of Wine was ...

BACCO ! 😉 

I like that HOGSHEAD OF WINE is 133 Simple cipher. 😉

https://www.light-of-truth.com/ciphers.html

image.png.d7085d595f0465b719eb9b16364d4759.png

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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On 1/7/2024 at 1:45 PM, Allisnum2er said:

Hi everyone,

I would like to share with you something that I found this morning by "error".

I was looking for something in the First Folio that I deciphered few years ago, and I remembered that it was on a leaf in relation with one of the "Fra Rosi Crosse" ciphers.

I chose the wrong one and it led me to page 574 of the First Folio that is on the 287th leaf.

287 = FRA ROSI CROSS (Kay cipher).

Once again, this could be something that has already been disovered, but just in case, I share it with you.

image.png.5a17b5a1aa527252037bd19beeb472b5.png

I immediatly thought about Shakespeare's Monument ...

scroll.jpg

https://sirbacon.org/gallery/west.htm

We know that the number of letters adds to 157 = FRA ROSI CROSSE (simple cipher).

"his finger on his Temple(s)" is a reference to the 287th leaf of the First Folio.

287 = FRA ROSI CROSSE (Kay cipher)

Ang guess what ?

"Finger" is the 33rd word of this passage 😉 

image.png.ceec1b7d5771fc9f90874d6a263627f0.png

Joy 😊

EDIT 1 :

Interestingly enough, there are 68 words in total in this passage.

It gives us 67 words + the 33rd one that is "finger"

FRANCIS BACON

Please note that in this case I am not sure that it was intended by Bacon/Shakespeare but it could have been the reason of the choice made by the persons behind the making of Shakespeare's Monument in 1740.

 

"he casts his eye against the moone, in strange postures"

Hen v111 act 3 scene 2

  EYE = 33  MOONE = 67  : Francis Bacon.

Rawley said Francis fainted at full moone.

Francis is the man in the moone.

in passing, I have spent quite some time studying your 'star' pattern in the dedication, but I am still unable to grasp a great deal of what you are saying. Probably me being a bit dense. Anyway, it seems that you are most certainly enjoying looking into the thing. Have you spent much time researching the significance of the last two letters yet? I doubt they stand for "Thomas Thorpe".

Keep on truckin'

 

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The man in the moone was not a buffoon

 

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25 minutes ago, peethagoras said:

"he casts his eye against the moone, in strange postures"

Hen v111 act 3 scene 2

  EYE = 33  MOONE = 67  : Francis Bacon.

Rawley said Francis fainted at full moone.

Francis is the man in the moone.

in passing, I have spent quite some time studying your 'star' pattern in the dedication, but I am still unable to grasp a great deal of what you are saying. Probably me being a bit dense. Anyway, it seems that you are most certainly enjoying looking into the thing. Have you spent much time researching the significance of the last two letters yet? I doubt they stand for "Thomas Thorpe".

Keep on truckin'

 

Thank you for sharing Peethagoras.

Your question about the "star" pattern in the dedication is, I think, for Light-Of-Truth 🙂 

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