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I have my 🕵🏻 sleuthing hat on again and I was looking at Shakespeare’s monument and the very well-known inscription...

01EC6854-ADB4-4CE2-B61C-7469F7B4FC08.jpeg.bda22f7dd7790f71da88ef259bde7e52.jpeg
note the very slight differences which may be nothing but ...

C07F54A7-56FA-48A1-97A1-77F9A33867F5.jpeg.ba9b2ec788ee6ab337c94a6a15c9b5e7.jpeg

this led me to looking at a book by John Weever, who was very much intertwined with the ‘Shakespeare circle’.  He spent three decades noting inscriptions on funeral monuments and produced this book in 1631 (he died shortly after).

65C561F1-39D5-4597-AF43-065CEFD19440.jpeg.13476dd7b378de0f211734fe65f5c185.jpeg

Curiously, although The Society of Antiquaries hold his notebooks in which he had mentioned Shakespeare’s monument and the inscription, there is no mention of it, or Shakespeare, in this detailed book. 
 

There is also no page 33. It skips 32-34. 💥

It contains lots of fascinating info about Saint Alban, Saint German (Germain) and an interesting introduction and of course things about Philip Sidney, the de Veres, Nicholas Bacon and mentions of Francis - although no mention of his burial, even though he had died 5 years before publication. 
 

I have taken some screenshots (pinch to enlarge) It’s a book definitely worthy of further scrutiny by contributors or visitors to this forum due to mentions of Apollo and Minerva, Latin inscriptions and other titbits.

Kate

FA19F149-649A-4475-97C2-2B5512298A71.png.fbc959801df7aee4f55722a08b53c467.png
ACF05DD3-8DAF-4D03-906A-A61C40B06E3E.png.99cdfd6ff6de6cdc9c34614a5fad6097.png

Note the mention above (in relation to Gorhambury) of Astrologie! 
1AFB568E-57CC-44CF-B49B-9D62FDB1646B.jpeg.36e46229f814de7df2193528d9a49100.jpeg

823F4359-6568-4FDD-A9EB-9342B01DDA89.jpeg.b912e225dabd0b89b37cbed4824f7619.jpeg

D5CF8F57-D81C-47DB-B59A-7078D0940BBD.jpeg.8fa258df08a1033565c9ff6336200679.jpeg

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For what its worth, on page 157 and 287, "Saint Albans" is in the 4th line from the bottom of the page.

Page 157

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=gri.ark:/13960/t79s5c364&view=1up&seq=179&skin=2021

image.png.0945a507b34cb3fb8e2f5f96da71906b.png

 

Page 287

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=gri.ark:/13960/t79s5c364&view=1up&seq=307&skin=2021

image.png.9343a867d8abfaf5389cca70de69a113.png

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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"For what its worth, on page 157 and 287, "Saint Albans" is in the 4th line from the bottom of the page" 😀❤️

Great find Rob , this can effectively be an ingenious way to hide the number 44.

Kate, I think that you have made another remarkable discovery and found another gold mine ! 🙏❤️

2022-05-22.png.48ae5878bc367c7557fc00a5373956c8.png

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=gri.ark:/13960/t79s5c364&view=1up&seq=9&skin=2021

If the page 33 is misnumbered (32) this is also the case of the page 93 (92)

93 or IC, I see, Iesus Christ.

Moreover, the page 102 is missing being also misnumbered ( 103 the simple cipher of SHAKESPEARE)

ONE HUNDRED TWO = WILLIAM TUDOR I = 157 simple cipher and 287 Kaye cipher.

It can be a way to conceal that WILLIAM TUDOR I (BACON) was SHAKESPEARE.

image.png.962296857177e01d6dbf2572648f5444.png

53 is the simple cipher of POET/SOW/SWAN

And 53 is the "De furtivis" cipher of TUDOR.

This can be just a coincidence but, interestingly, we have BACON - TUDOR - PILATE interwoven.

and the "Pilate" comes from the Latin word "Pilum" meaning SPEAR.

I let you discover the "Thirty three" on page 54 😉 

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=gri.ark:/13960/t79s5c364&view=1up&seq=80&skin=2021

 

 

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Indeed 33 on page 54.

image.png.a37f586f0bab833e6c2f34e4924c4031.png

Not hard to build some "BACON" in this section. 😉

 

Funny, July 16 is Day 197 and is mostly contained in Sonnet 84. 84 is the Simple cipher of ELIZABETH.

http://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#Day197

image.png.5be579c1580894425575c2de1a8f1c52.png

The cipher numbers of Sonnet 84 are interesting:

http://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#cipherSonnet084

image.png.bc4ef4a63888927ef6ae3beab4c1d577.png

Simple cipher 183, ONE EIGHTY THREE is 157 Simple and 365 Kaye cipher.

Short cipher 39 the same as the Short cipher of ELIZABETH.

Kaye cipher 287 the same Kaye cipher as WILLIAM TUDOR I.

Modern alphabet 182 Reverse cipher, ONE EIGHTY TWO is 157 Simple and 287 Kaye ciphers.

Modern alphabet Short cipher 52, the Simple cipher of WILL.

The Sonnets is speaking to Elizabeth, "In whose confine immured is the store - Which should example where your equal grew."

In the 26 Tiered design, Day 197 begins the 15th Tier right after the 14th Tier is passed. That would be Day 365 in the 14 Tier design.

http://www.light-of-truth.com/pyras10.htm

image.png.590ee7c51851d651f5fae7379b44e40b.png

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Posted (edited)

Also curious in the mis-numbered page 102 (numbered 103) are the words "one hundred and three":

image.png.86c57d498908175a4e14b22642f6c151.png

And the date March 10 which is Day 69 in the Sonnets with the first full line number is 404 on the Sonnets in Sonnet 29:

http://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#Sonnet029

image.png.90ecec0a858b470a490cc982948fe130.png

Look a the cipher numbers of Sonnet 29:

http://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#cipherSonnet029

image.png.080eafbed7118cb513716669aa55d515.png

157 Simple and 365 Kaye ciphers, and with the 11 letters (lines 2-12) the Simple cipher is 111.

The Short cipher is 58 the same as the Short cipher of WILLIAM TUDOR I.

Interesting in the Pyramid design with the main 14 Tier Pyramid when we go from Sonnet 66 to Sonnet 67 we enter Day 157. In the Tier design we go from Day 66 to Day 67 and we see the Sonnet 29 cipher numbers with 157 and 365. Plus both Sonnet 29 and Sonnet 67 have the 11 letter Simple cipher of 111.

http://www.light-of-truth.com/pyramid-GMT.php#cipherSonnet066

image.png.b648c98e6ddbb8bb8e0d6a139d39452b.png

It is so exciting to me!

And remember ONE HUNDRED THREE is 157 Simple and 365 Kaye ciphers.

image.png.874cd245d3edeefdbb75fd21549529e1.png

 

 

Edited by Light-of-Truth
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                                                                         JOHN WEEVER REVEALS THAT FRANCIS BACON IS SHAKESPEARE.

In 1599 the English poet and antiquary John Weever (1575/6-1632) published his Epigrammes in the Oldest Cut, and Newest Fashion containing epigrams on (among others) to Shakespeare.

Very little is known about his early life before he was admitted to Queen’s College, Cambridge on 30 April 1594 where Bacon had been at Trinity College, Cambridge two decades before. Throughout his lifetime Bacon was in continual contact with the professors and grandees of Cambridge University to whom he later dedicated The Wisdom of the Ancients. His visits to Cambridge University may have marked the beginning of his hidden and obscured relationship with Weever who a few years later after his graduation from Cambridge in the spring of 1598 was moving in the same literary circles as Bacon, Jonson, Michael Drayton, Samuel Daniel and John Marston. Sometime after moving to London Weever purchased a house in Gray’s Inn a stone throw away from Bacon’s own private quarters at Gray’s Inn where for the previous two decades he had been de facto Master of the Revels producing masques, plays and other dramatic devices and entertainments.

The poem ‘Ad Gulielmum Shakespeare in Weever’s Epigrammes (1599) is the earliest known complete poem addressed to Shakespeare and is the only poem in the volume to take the same form of a Shakespearean sonnet which suggests that he may have seen or was in possession of some of the unpublished Shakespeare sonnets which then only circulated in manuscript before their publication a decade later.

In 1600 Weever published a curious volume entitled Faunus and Melliflora that commences with an erotic poem in the style of Venus and Adonis but which after a thousand lines abruptly changes to a mythical account of satires. It concludes with comments relating to the burning of the satirical books ordered by the Archbishop of Canterbury on 4 June 1599 and the two satirists Joseph Hall and John Marston who (although of course this is not mentioned by Weever) in a series of satires between 1597 to 1599 revealed that Bacon was the concealed author of the two Shakespeare poems Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece.      

In his 1599 volume Epigram no 11 which is also clearly about ‘Shakespeare’ and Venus and Adonis is headed ‘In Spurium quendam scriptorem’ which implies it has been fathered upon some other writer, in other words set forth, behind a living mask or pseudonym. Furthermore, Weever knows the true identity of the concealed author of the Shakespeare poems Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece, Romeo and Juliet, and the early Shakespeare history plays, which he cryptically reveals for those with eyes to see. The first poem is numbered 11 and the second poem addressed to ‘Ad Gulielmum Shakespeare’ is numbered 22: 11+22=33 Bacon in simple cipher and in the second verse he likens ‘Shakespeare’, whom he knows to be Bacon, to Apollo.

Shortly after the supposed death of Francis Bacon in 1626 his private secretary and Rosicrucian Brother Dr William Rawley issued the Memoriae Honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis De Verulamio, Vice-Comitis Sancti Albani Sacrum containing thirty-two Latin elegies wherein eleven of the versifiers held Bacon up as the leader of Apollo and the Nine Muses.1 Herein he is called another Apollo, described as greater than Apollo, and said that Apollo was fearful Bacon would replace him as King of the Muses. In elegy XII we are unreservedly informed that Bacon is Apollo ‘How has it happened to us, the disciples of the Muses, that Apollo, the leader of the choir, should die?’ and in Elegy XXI ‘Apollo, the darling, learned Bacon, of your native land’. In Elegy XXIII Bacon is portrayed as the leader of Apollo and the Muses ‘Think you, foolish traveller, that the leader of the choir of the Muses and of Phoebus is interred in the cold marble?’ and in elegy XX Bacon has replaced Apollo the god of poetry as the tenth muse ‘O Bacon! none, trust me, none will there be. Lament now sincerely, O Clio! and sisters of Clio, ah! the tenth muse and the glory of the choir has perished.’ Likewise, the muses are directly referred to on thirteen occasions:   

Elegy II

                                                                 …which the power of great Bacon brought forth, a muse more rare than the nine muses...2

Elegy IV

The Columbus of Apollo with his lordly crew passes beyond the Pillars of Hercules in order to bestow a new world and new arts. . .Come, mourning Muses, gather frankincense from the heights of Libanus.3                 

Elegy V

Wherefore, ye Muses, would you cultivate the useless laurels of your sad garden?. . .He hath left the living, whom alone it was wont to bear the laurel crown for. Verulam reigning in the citadel of the gods shines with a golden crown;…Than whom no inhabitant of Earth was master of greater intellectual gifts; nor does any survivor so skilfully unite Themis and Pallas. While he flourished the sacred choir of the Muses influenced by these arts poured forth all their eloquence in his praise….4

Elegy IX

      Muses pour forth your perennial waters in lamentations, and let Apollo shed tears (plentiful as the water) which even the Castalian stream contains…5

Elegy XII

                                                   How has it happened to us, the disciples of the Muses, that Apollo, the leader of our choir, should die....

Elegy XVIII 

The day-star of the Muses has set before his hour!...Melpomene rebuking would not endure this; and addressed the dire goddesses in these words:-“Atropos, never before truly cruel; take the whole world, only give me back my Phoebus. Ah! woe is me! neither heaven, nor death, nor the muse O Bacon! nor my prayers prevented your doom.

Elegy XIX

….O Bacon! as much as you have given to the world and to the Muses, or if you mean to be a creditor, love, the world, the Muses, Jove’s treasury, prayers, heaven, poetry, incense, grief will stop payment.8

Elegy XX

…O Bacon! none, trust me, none will there be. Lament now sincerely, O Clio! and sisters of Clio, ah! the tenth Muse and the glory of the choir has perished. Ah! never before has Apollo himself been truly unhappy! Whence will there be another to love him so? Ah! he is no longer going to have the full number; and unavoidable is it now for Apollo to be content with nine Muses.9

                                                                                                                              Elegy XXIII

Think you, foolish traveller, that the leader of the choir of the Muses and of Phoebus is interred in the cold marble? Away, you are deceived. The Verulamian star now glitters in ruddy Olympus….10

Elegy XXIX

                                                              ….And you, who were able to immortalize the Muses, could you die yourself, O Bacon?11

Elegy XXX

                                                           ….and the fountain of the Muses shall have become dry, resolving itself into tiny tears.12

Elegy XXXI

                                           …so Death relentless on a day hostile to the Muses smites this man much skilled in warding off a blow.13

 

1. William Rawley, ed., Memoriae Honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis De

    Vervlamio, Vice-Comitis Sancti Albani Sacrum (Londoni: In Officini Johannis

    Haviland, 1626).

2. W. G. C. Gundry, ed., Manes Verulamiani (London: The Chiswick Press, 1950),

    p. 38.

3. Ibid., p. 39.

4. Ibid., pp. 39-40.

5. Ibid., p. 41.

6. Ibid., p. 41.

7. Ibid., p. 43.

8. Ibid., p. 43.

9. Ibid., p. 43.

10. Ibid., p. 44.

11. Ibid., p. 45.

12. Ibid., p. 46.

13. Ibid., p. 46.

[I am primarily indebted for the information about the life and publications of John Weever to David Kathman, John Weever (1575/6-1632), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004-22)]

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Good Evening A Phoenix.   You are our indispensable well of knowledge 🙏! I did not know the story of John Weever . Thank you for this insightful historical perspective and masterful presentation. ❤️

Edited by Allisnum2er
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With knowing the connection between Weever and Bacon, the mis-numbered pages make sense along with other clues.

On page 476 Weever says this about Bacon:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=gri.ark:/13960/t79s5c364&view=1up&seq=496&skin=2021

Whosoeuer would know further of this king, let him reade his History, wherein hee is delineated to the life, by the matchlesse and neuer enough admired penne of that famous, learned, and eloquent knight, Sir Francis Bacon, not long since deceased, Lord Verulam and Viscount Saint Alban.

 

 

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Mention of John Weever in Cockburn: In N. B. Cockburn, The Bacon Shakespeare Question: The Baconian Theory Made Sane (1998), in a discussion of a Latin play performed at Cambridge, Laelia, Cockburn suggests Laelia may have been a source for Twelfth Night.  Two of the men who had acted in the Queen's Day device presented by Essex (written by Bacon, said Spedding and E.K. Chambers) had also performed in the Cambridge performance of Laelia, March 1, 1595 (229-233, 229). They were George Meriton and George Mountaine, we know from John Weever's Eipgrams in the oldest cut and newest fashion (1594-1599) (Epigram 19 in the "Fourth Week") and also a letter (Rowland Whyte to Robert Sidney (229).   Cockburn suggests it could be inferred that Bacon, having seen these actors in Laelia, arranged for these two actors to perform in the Essex device for Queen's Day (230).

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Good evening Kate !

The "b" of "buried" is the only "b" on the plaque which praise John Heminge and Henry Condell.

Here is a way to "reveal" Francis Bacon.

To the Memory of
John Heminge
and
Henry Condell
Fellow  Actors
and  Personal Friends
of  Shakespeare
they lived many years in this
parish and are buried here

 

 

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Posted (edited)

There’s another monument I’d like to add to the thread, the one of Shakespeare in Wilton House dated 1743.(Wiltonhouse.co.uk) once home to William Herbert (WH).
99F9EDEE-6257-405E-8FCB-9138660EEC6B.jpeg.57e5e71abc98f357fb6269a1e2d7ac31.jpeg

I have just uploaded a video (details in the Bacon and Art section) and at the end of watching it through, the YouTube algorithms pushed me towards a video by Alexander Waugh and I saw reference to it. I’d be most interested to hear what Baconians can see in this inscription. 
 

Alexander Waugh videos, especially the ‘they knew’ playlist ie Ben Jonson knew, Weever knew, etc., etc are a goldmine because in many (not all) you can see how he’s misreading clues that actually point to Bacon, so they are well worth watching for that reason, but hats off to him for his entertaining videos and clever graphics and leading me to the Wilton Monument.

K

Editing to say, I have now seen that Peter Dawkins has done a lengthy video on this memorial so I’m adding it here.

 

 

Edited by Kate
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On 5/22/2022 at 7:16 PM, A Phoenix said:

                                                                         JOHN WEEVER REVEALS THAT FRANCIS BACON IS SHAKESPEARE.

In 1599 the English poet and antiquary John Weever (1575/6-1632) published his Epigrammes in the Oldest Cut, and Newest Fashion containing epigrams on (among others) to Shakespeare.

Very little is known about his early life before he was admitted to Queen’s College, Cambridge on 30 April 1594 where Bacon had been at Trinity College, Cambridge two decades before. Throughout his lifetime Bacon was in continual contact with the professors and grandees of Cambridge University to whom he later dedicated The Wisdom of the Ancients. His visits to Cambridge University may have marked the beginning of his hidden and obscured relationship with Weever who a few years later after his graduation from Cambridge in the spring of 1598 was moving in the same literary circles as Bacon, Jonson, Michael Drayton, Samuel Daniel and John Marston. Sometime after moving to London Weever purchased a house in Gray’s Inn a stone throw away from Bacon’s own private quarters at Gray’s Inn where for the previous two decades he had been de facto Master of the Revels producing masques, plays and other dramatic devices and entertainments.

The poem ‘Ad Gulielmum Shakespeare in Weever’s Epigrammes (1599) is the earliest known complete poem addressed to Shakespeare and is the only poem in the volume to take the same form of a Shakespearean sonnet which suggests that he may have seen or was in possession of some of the unpublished Shakespeare sonnets which then only circulated in manuscript before their publication a decade later.

In 1600 Weever published a curious volume entitled Faunus and Melliflora that commences with an erotic poem in the style of Venus and Adonis but which after a thousand lines abruptly changes to a mythical account of satires. It concludes with comments relating to the burning of the satirical books ordered by the Archbishop of Canterbury on 4 June 1599 and the two satirists Joseph Hall and John Marston who (although of course this is not mentioned by Weever) in a series of satires between 1597 to 1599 revealed that Bacon was the concealed author of the two Shakespeare poems Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece.      

In his 1599 volume Epigram no 11 which is also clearly about ‘Shakespeare’ and Venus and Adonis is headed ‘In Spurium quendam scriptorem’ which implies it has been fathered upon some other writer, in other words set forth, behind a living mask or pseudonym. Furthermore, Weever knows the true identity of the concealed author of the Shakespeare poems Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece, Romeo and Juliet, and the early Shakespeare history plays, which he cryptically reveals for those with eyes to see. The first poem is numbered 11 and the second poem addressed to ‘Ad Gulielmum Shakespeare’ is numbered 22: 11+22=33 Bacon in simple cipher and in the second verse he likens ‘Shakespeare’, whom he knows to be Bacon, to Apollo.

Shortly after the supposed death of Francis Bacon in 1626 his private secretary and Rosicrucian Brother Dr William Rawley issued the Memoriae Honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis De Verulamio, Vice-Comitis Sancti Albani Sacrum containing thirty-two Latin elegies wherein eleven of the versifiers held Bacon up as the leader of Apollo and the Nine Muses.1 Herein he is called another Apollo, described as greater than Apollo, and said that Apollo was fearful Bacon would replace him as King of the Muses. In elegy XII we are unreservedly informed that Bacon is Apollo ‘How has it happened to us, the disciples of the Muses, that Apollo, the leader of the choir, should die?’ and in Elegy XXI ‘Apollo, the darling, learned Bacon, of your native land’. In Elegy XXIII Bacon is portrayed as the leader of Apollo and the Muses ‘Think you, foolish traveller, that the leader of the choir of the Muses and of Phoebus is interred in the cold marble?’ and in elegy XX Bacon has replaced Apollo the god of poetry as the tenth muse ‘O Bacon! none, trust me, none will there be. Lament now sincerely, O Clio! and sisters of Clio, ah! the tenth muse and the glory of the choir has perished.’ Likewise, the muses are directly referred to on thirteen occasions:   

Elegy II

                                                                 …which the power of great Bacon brought forth, a muse more rare than the nine muses...2

Elegy IV

The Columbus of Apollo with his lordly crew passes beyond the Pillars of Hercules in order to bestow a new world and new arts. . .Come, mourning Muses, gather frankincense from the heights of Libanus.3                 

Elegy V

Wherefore, ye Muses, would you cultivate the useless laurels of your sad garden?. . .He hath left the living, whom alone it was wont to bear the laurel crown for. Verulam reigning in the citadel of the gods shines with a golden crown;…Than whom no inhabitant of Earth was master of greater intellectual gifts; nor does any survivor so skilfully unite Themis and Pallas. While he flourished the sacred choir of the Muses influenced by these arts poured forth all their eloquence in his praise….4

Elegy IX

      Muses pour forth your perennial waters in lamentations, and let Apollo shed tears (plentiful as the water) which even the Castalian stream contains…5

Elegy XII

                                                   How has it happened to us, the disciples of the Muses, that Apollo, the leader of our choir, should die....

Elegy XVIII 

The day-star of the Muses has set before his hour!...Melpomene rebuking would not endure this; and addressed the dire goddesses in these words:-“Atropos, never before truly cruel; take the whole world, only give me back my Phoebus. Ah! woe is me! neither heaven, nor death, nor the muse O Bacon! nor my prayers prevented your doom.

Elegy XIX

….O Bacon! as much as you have given to the world and to the Muses, or if you mean to be a creditor, love, the world, the Muses, Jove’s treasury, prayers, heaven, poetry, incense, grief will stop payment.8

Elegy XX

…O Bacon! none, trust me, none will there be. Lament now sincerely, O Clio! and sisters of Clio, ah! the tenth Muse and the glory of the choir has perished. Ah! never before has Apollo himself been truly unhappy! Whence will there be another to love him so? Ah! he is no longer going to have the full number; and unavoidable is it now for Apollo to be content with nine Muses.9

                                                                                                                              Elegy XXIII

Think you, foolish traveller, that the leader of the choir of the Muses and of Phoebus is interred in the cold marble? Away, you are deceived. The Verulamian star now glitters in ruddy Olympus….10

Elegy XXIX

                                                              ….And you, who were able to immortalize the Muses, could you die yourself, O Bacon?11

Elegy XXX

                                                           ….and the fountain of the Muses shall have become dry, resolving itself into tiny tears.12

Elegy XXXI

                                           …so Death relentless on a day hostile to the Muses smites this man much skilled in warding off a blow.13

 

1. William Rawley, ed., Memoriae Honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis De

    Vervlamio, Vice-Comitis Sancti Albani Sacrum (Londoni: In Officini Johannis

    Haviland, 1626).

2. W. G. C. Gundry, ed., Manes Verulamiani (London: The Chiswick Press, 1950),

    p. 38.

3. Ibid., p. 39.

4. Ibid., pp. 39-40.

5. Ibid., p. 41.

6. Ibid., p. 41.

7. Ibid., p. 43.

8. Ibid., p. 43.

9. Ibid., p. 43.

10. Ibid., p. 44.

11. Ibid., p. 45.

12. Ibid., p. 46.

13. Ibid., p. 46.

[I am primarily indebted for the information about the life and publications of John Weever to David Kathman, John Weever (1575/6-1632), Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004-22)]

 

 

 

image.png

Hmm. I just took a look at Faunus and Melliflora and we are missing an a but M, for Master or F Bcon is on the page with the Rosicrucian double AA headpiece.  Amazing references to Apollo in your post. Thank you for sharing.

Weever.png.89b9178ae8af4bfea22bf7811f024749.png

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Could the secret message be  : " Me , Worshipful Master F. BACON" ?

with W+M = 12 + 21 = 33 = BACON

Love it!!

For Kate...

WM is W is 21 and M is 12 to make 2112.

Two 2's with 11 between? And the 11 can be 1+1=2 to make 222.

2112 always takes me back the Rush album. Just watched this video, caught a few Bacon things but will have to watch again to even get a grip on what Rush was even thinking!

Lately even in my non-Bacon world the number 2 is showing up. Of course it was always around, but now it is catching my attention. 😉

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here are the two inscriptions on the 'Twin' Westminster and Wilton Memorials, side by side.

1571888858_Wilton1.jpg.c90f558f328c8dc9349e456cd89cb735.jpg

1319994083_Wilton2.jpg.14a0d252e01e5f82832f2ba9a6b114fd.jpg

1531610543_Wilton3.jpg.f0b11d9285519b8e3a814222c8e93b5a.jpg

I must just say Rob and Lawrence, that it is absolutely brilliant that we are able to amass all this wealth of information pertaining to Francis Bacon and his Rosicrucian 'brotherhood'  and the Works of Shakespeare in one place. - all thanks to you. Even though it's only a small group of us posting I can see the numbers of people reading  are large and it's providing a wonderful service to open people's minds across the globe. Thank you again

 

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