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Another New Exciting Discovery?


Kate

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Hi

I have a little bit of trepidation about posting this as I don’t want to appear foolish, but could this be a hog’s head?

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I was reading Baconiana for 1892 and I saw this letter. 

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4F6FCC63-A460-4C12-AD51-B68BE54F98DD.jpeg.7dbc89e209e321931de45decc8210f20.jpeg

This led me to look at paintings of Shakespeare that had belonged to the Duke of Buckingham - whether it’s this one the writer is referring to or not I don’t know for sure, but I saved it then played around with the exposure. I was looking to find what Shakespeare was pointing to and what I found  looked to me like a hog’s head - obv this is an animal we know is associated with Bacon. Then I looked even more closely and could see what appears to be writing.

FD3FB821-A94A-419B-9D24-9AAF60B4EB8A.jpeg.ca42dfae837255baada33876c1f5ada0.jpeg
 

The one above is from Wiki, this is when I played around with it to see what he may be pointing at. If it’s his knee it’s very oddly positioned.

ED883322-7766-409C-AD79-F68899237C2A.jpeg.91c56716a2e71899c513b31419274381.jpeg

Here’s the (potential) writing. It’s actually much clearer but the photo doesn’t show it. I’ll see if I can get a better picture. Look carefully there are large letters with a row of smaller ones right underneath.

A74A20F0-2655-4A2D-A032-9C65BAE8FD18.jpeg.5ab8df95b01abca182b6a71059b55e23.jpeg

I wasn’t sure if I had the right image (that this man was referring to back in 1892) so I googled around until I found an 1876 edition of Shakespeare plays. It had the Droeshout Portrait at the front.

95AE88B7-EB80-4400-9ADA-850BF94BFB11.jpeg.f070736126cf4fab6b5e4a69418ec74e.jpeg

so I looked closely at that and again, in really high definition, it looks like the artist/engraver has woven something into the background and if you turn it on its side it looks like writing. Straight on however it looks like some sort of emblem.

B7C2CCB8-2DEA-4238-8510-C16C66EF5705.jpeg.e80ceb6ac9d25a8d935b395089949edf.jpeg

more defined it looks like this 

026D3E2E-04A4-443E-AE43-C10FA5CAC6E4.jpeg.86076379bf987ab192e7249d75fc62fa.jpeg

That looks a bit like a B. I would imagine this engraving has been scanned and looked at with a microscope by the Folger Library and others on many occasions over the years, but you never know? I will write to them and ask if it has. 

Kate  

Edited by Kate
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 "For nothing is born without unity or without the point." amazon.com/dp/B0CLDKDPY8

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He could just be pointing at the burning lamp which is resting on the book in front of the arm of the chair.

C6858B69-C2F3-4DCA-B16A-9AE68A49F72C.jpeg.ba8be9a61d1c4fdff9b800d5c20e9892.jpeg


This below is from  FBRT.org.uk. (Peter Dawkins) 

“Nay, the same Salomon the king affirmeth directly that the glory of  God is to conceal a thing, but the glory  of the king is to find it out [Proverbs 25:2], as if according to the innocent play of children the divine Majesty took delight to hide his works, to the end to have them found out; for in naming the king he intendeth man, taking such a condition of man as hath most excellency and greatest commandment of wits and means, alluding also to his own person, being truly one of those clearest burning lamps, whereof himself speaketh in another place, when he saith the spirit of man is as the lamp of god, wherewith he searcheth all inwardness [Proverbs 20:27]…” (Francis Bacon, Valerius Terminus, Of the Interpretation of Nature.)

Kate

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Hi Kate, we have missed you and your posts.

I completely agree with you. It certainly looks like a Hog's head.

Regarding the writing. Looking straightforward I think I can see the shape of a Coney (Baconey) on his/her hind legs and when looked at in landscape there does appear to be some small writing and also possibly the initials FB, the letter F being larger than the letter B. It will be recalled that the 1623 First Folio was dedicated to William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke, then Grand Master of England and the letters F and B appear over the Freemasonic headpiece of 1723-5 (one hundred years later: 100 Francis Bacon in simple cipher) edition of the Shakespeare Sonnets by the poet and Freemason Alexander Pope and Dr Sewell.   

Great Work, Kate.

 

 

7 FB.png

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Thank you AP ☺️

What I haven’t told you is that I was looking back to the 1800s due to the astrology! I’ll post about that in a separate place later or over the weekend.

It’s all getting curiouser and curiouser, because I’ve looked at the writing in more filters and it says S (although it looks like a B until you really zoom in) and then the next line appears to say Essex! I’d say that with 90% certainty. It’s difficult to show here but the E is right next to his arm. 
it looks like a B just above it (not the large letter). There is writing under the word Essex too.

Also under the desk is a strange shape thing. It looks like either a soft crown-like hat, almost like Maharajah’s wear with a jewel in the centre which would rest between the eyebrows. 
 

Maybe you know what that may be? 

It might be something else but that’s what it looks like. 99% sure it’s a jewel.

Kate
 

B3078CC0-5726-49F5-AF2E-234D1461ED7F.jpeg.7fa18352df4b1d040b00c158edc55945.jpeg
 

2498A8E4-BC50-4BDA-AE68-CDE1F3255C12.jpeg.869d0ba9f963a291b7e051985cc0914c.jpeg

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What I haven’t told you is that I was looking back to the 1800s due to the astrology!

Just curious, Kate.

Few things in my life this week, this morning (and yesterday) being a peak on multiple levels with multiple threads of importance. We had a full Lunar eclipse earlier this week, I have looked at the Sonnets and posted where we are with plenty of significance.

I see planets every morning in the eastern sky as the sun is rising. Hurricane season is about to kick in. Lot going on. My wife retires at the end of next week.

Curious what the charts are showing. 🙂

 

 

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
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This is awesome Kate !  Great work ! 😃 You're totally right.  And now I do not see anything other but this Hog's Head ! 😄

The fact is that I examined this Portrait last week  (synchronicity !) and I planned to share my findings in the next few days.

So I believe that it is the right time, and the right place.

2022-05-21.png.d6a00877c325e2123cd9cbbac76671ef.png

Notice that in Chesterfield Portrait, Shakespeare's right hand is placed on the First Folio that is open right in its middle.

This is a reference to Mediocria Firma , Francis Bacon's motto (The Middle Way is safe).

And it is an invitation to take a look at the middle of the Book.

There are 907 pages in the First Folio.

So let's take a look at the 453th page and at the 454th page.

The play is "The First Part of Henry the Sixth" (Pages 99 and 100) 

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/Bran_F1/453/index.html%3fzoom=1200.html

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/454/index.html%3Fzoom=850.html

 

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158513605_2022-05-21(5).png.c0b1396928f1bb71be40901e6b8ed846.png

https://www.pinterest.fr/pin/constellation-of-the-gemini-galaxy-antique-map-of-the-moon--675258537884557414/

 

1549334140_2022-05-21(6).png.9cfc4c09519365704814bcf7ac44cc11.png

To conclude , here is something that I noticed in an engraving of Georges Vertue ...

2134108664_2022-05-21(7).png.55658181b012fe05ef472731a1fd9ba4.png

https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1868-0822-5113

 

Edited by Allisnum2er
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Thanks Yann. That Mermaid Tavern picture is interesting. That’s Bacon at the back, yes? Got to love those men in tights eh!  I’ll have a closer look at that.  Regarding my comment about what is under the desk, I realise I hadn’t posted an image to show it, so here it is. It could be a skull I guess, but looking at it in many hues it is definitely a jewel in the middle so I think it’s a hat. The hand in the book is also pointing to the V on the cloth, this V is symbolic of the number 5 (beauty, harmony, love) and of the downward pointing triangle. Looks like a W further down? By the way, the S May also be the number 5.

 

41FD4AF3-1684-4504-B72B-565349AF6EB7.jpeg.01f4157237b439ca007cb58f4532cf72.jpeg

Also, re your message Rob, as Moderator you’ll know best, but my feeling is that in order to keep these matters separate it may be best to reply to you about that in the thread I created the other day about Bacon and Astrology. I’ll hop over there now. Kate 

Edited by Kate
To add about S perhaps being the number 5
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 "For nothing is born without unity or without the point." amazon.com/dp/B0CLDKDPY8

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Love the Robert Dudley symbol in the link, Yann.

I also notice, now I look again at the Chesterfield image, that the collar is literally pointing to the word Essex. Does this somehow refer to the Earl(e) of Essex, Robert Devereaux? Here’s another paper from Peter Dawkins entitled Francis Bacon, Shakespeare & the Earl of Essex.

https://www.fbrt.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Francis_Bacon_Shakespeare__the_Earl_of_Essex.pdf

Kate

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On 5/20/2022 at 5:41 PM, Kate said:

He could just be pointing at the burning lamp which is resting on the book in front of the arm of the chair.

C6858B69-C2F3-4DCA-B16A-9AE68A49F72C.jpeg.ba8be9a61d1c4fdff9b800d5c20e9892.jpeg


This below is from  FBRT.org.uk. (Peter Dawkins) 

“Nay, the same Salomon the king affirmeth directly that the glory of  God is to conceal a thing, but the glory  of the king is to find it out [Proverbs 25:2], as if according to the innocent play of children the divine Majesty took delight to hide his works, to the end to have them found out; for in naming the king he intendeth man, taking such a condition of man as hath most excellency and greatest commandment of wits and means, alluding also to his own person, being truly one of those clearest burning lamps, whereof himself speaketh in another place, when he saith the spirit of man is as the lamp of god, wherewith he searcheth all inwardness [Proverbs 20:27]…” (Francis Bacon, Valerius Terminus, Of the Interpretation of Nature.)

Kate

Just noticed another thing about the lamp. While reading Ryan Murtha’s excellent PDF in The Esoteric Francis Bacon (on this forum) I noticed this70B7B956-C472-4B89-9B10-53295BD4884D.jpeg.d2634827caa739581948698dfbd4cb38.jpeg

 

So Yann’s observation of the finger in the middle of the book coupled with the lamp alludes strongly to Bacon. We now just need to definitively link the hat(?) under the table and the word Essex at the point of the collar. 
 

Kate

One other thought. No artist would paint a picture of Shakespeare and cut off half his name. The first thing one thinks of is, it’s deliberate and conceals a code, like Yann mentioned, but the other option is that there is a larger picture and, if so, what else has been cut off?  I need to check if all images show it truncated. It may just be that it was cropped by whoever uploaded it to Wiki.

Further comment: just scrolled back and OMG, Yann, you are right. It’s not a hat, it’s a bear. The eye is visible. 

 

DF8CA121-766B-48B3-B77A-CC2998BAF809.jpeg.185d9481889343ed477061ca63cc3acb.jpeg

Edited by Kate
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Another finding. I think I’m getting hang of this! The Mirrour of Eloquence about Bacon came out in 1656. In 1719 this engraving was done by George Vertue. The word Mirrour is in the inscription and if we play around with the hues again, the letter F is revealed in the centre left. Over to the bottom right there is some writing. So far I can only make out something that may be Latin. It looks like Sairno? There may be 3 or 4 lines. I can make out other letters but, so far, not complete words.

Kate

The shadow bottom left forms a B.

Ignore the word brilliance. That’s the light setting.

 

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Edited by Kate
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 "For nothing is born without unity or without the point." amazon.com/dp/B0CLDKDPY8

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         FRANCIS BACON AND THE ANONYMOUS 1620 TRANSLATION OF BOCCACCIO'S DECAMERON PRINTED BY ISAAC JAGGARD (PRINTER OF THE

         1623 SHAKESPEARE FIRST FOLIO) WHOSE SPECIAL TITLE PAGE CONTAINS ELABORATE DECORATIVE IMAGES REPRESENTING THE LETTERS FB. 

The original Italian and the early French translation of Boccaccio's Decameron were drawn upon by Bacon as a source of inspiration for some of his Sonnets (in particular sonnet 38) and used as a source for Romeo and Juliet, Troilus and Cressida, The Merry Wives of Windsor, The Two Noble Kinsmen, Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale and All's Well That Ends Well.  

A little known anonymous translation of the Decameron appeared in 1620 whose translator has hitherto never been determined. Long after its publication some scholars wrongly attributed it to John Florio and in more recent times some Oxfordians have suggested it was translated by the Earl of Oxford, which, of course, falls beneath serious notice.

The article on 'THE SECRET, HIDDEN, AND OBSCURED, RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FRANCIS BACON AND THE JAGGARDS, PRINTERS AND PUBLISHERS OF HIS ESSAYS AND THE FIRST FOLIO OF THE SHAKESPEARE WORKS' extensively revealed and confirmed the connection between Lord Bacon and the Jaggard family. The anonymous translation of the Decameron was printed by Isaac Jaggard who with his father William Jaggard printed and published the Shakespeare First Folio.  It is my understanding that the translation is dedicated to Philip Herbert, Earl of Montgomery, to whom with his brother William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke (then Grand Master of England), Lord Bacon dedicated the Shakespeare First Folio.

The title page of the 1620 anonymous translation of the Decameron is of some especial interest.  The whole page has 69 italic letters, 22 words which with the addition of the date (1+6+2+0=9): 69+22+9=100 Francis Bacon in simple cipher and moreover the page contains 72 roman letters which added to the 22 words and the addition of the date: 72+22+9=103 Shakespeare in simple cipher, conveying the concealed cryptographic message that Francis Bacon is Shakespeare. 

The title page is adorned with what appears to be sixteen elaborate decorative images which on closer inspection are representations of the letters FB for Francis Bacon (some of which are mirror images). It should be noted that the whole page contains 141 letters which when added to the 16 'FB's' equals 157 Fra Rosicrosse in simple cipher.

 

 

  

Decameron.png

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1 hour ago, Kate said:

Another finding. I think I’m getting hang of this! The Mirrour of Eloquence about Bacon came out in 1656. In 1719 this engraving was done by George Vertue

Another great finding Kate ! 😃 A quick message from my office to tell you that thanks to you we have a new candidate using the special "w" ! 😉 

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1 hour ago, Allisnum2er said:

Another great finding Kate ! 😃 A quick message from my office to tell you that thanks to you we have a new candidate using the special "w" ! 😉 

Oh yes! So we do in words and just look at the three F’s in the inscription too. With the B in the shadow it’s a 🎯 

 

C1EC64B9-4955-467B-BF21-4F7ECB37A27E.jpeg.053184586ae521e3220659218c092ba8.jpeg
 

is Fancy Features (of the) Face, asking us to look more closely at the face? The mouth area is strange.

Thanks Yann and thanks, as ever, to AP (and Rob) for the continual nuggets.

Come on onlookers, join the forum and chip in! 

Kate 

PS. Can we have a ‘wow’ button Rob! I wanted to use one for all the FB’s on that cover AP posted! 

Edited by Kate
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 "For nothing is born without unity or without the point." amazon.com/dp/B0CLDKDPY8

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6 hours ago, A Phoenix said:

         FRANCIS BACON AND THE ANONYMOUS 1620 TRANSLATION OF BOCCACCIO'S DECAMERON PRINTED BY ISAAC JAGGARD (PRINTER OF THE

         1623 SHAKESPEARE FIRST FOLIO) WHOSE SPECIAL TITLE PAGE CONTAINS ELABORATE DECORATIVE IMAGES REPRESENTING THE LETTERS FB. 

The original Italian and the early French translation of Boccaccio's Decameron were drawn upon by Bacon as a source of inspiration for some of his Sonnets (in particular sonnet 38) and used as a source for Romeo and Juliet, Troilus and Cressida, The Merry Wives of Windsor, The Two Noble Kinsmen, Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale and All's Well That Ends Well.  

A little known anonymous translation of the Decameron appeared in 1620 whose translator has hitherto never been determined. Long after its publication some scholars wrongly attributed it to John Florio and in more recent times some Oxfordians have suggested it was translated by the Earl of Oxford, which, of course, falls beneath serious notice.

The article on 'THE SECRET, HIDDEN, AND OBSCURED, RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FRANCIS BACON AND THE JAGGARDS, PRINTERS AND PUBLISHERS OF HIS ESSAYS AND THE FIRST FOLIO OF THE SHAKESPEARE WORKS' extensively revealed and confirmed the connection between Lord Bacon and the Jaggard family. The anonymous translation of the Decameron was printed by Isaac Jaggard who with his father William Jaggard printed and published the Shakespeare First Folio.  It is my understanding that the translation is dedicated to Philip Herbert, Earl of Montgomery, to whom with his brother William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke (then Grand Master of England), Lord Bacon dedicated the Shakespeare First Folio.

The title page of the 1620 anonymous translation of the Decameron is of some especial interest.  The whole page has 69 italic letters, 22 words which with the addition of the date (1+6+2+0=9): 69+22+9=100 Francis Bacon in simple cipher and moroever the page contains 72 roman letters which added to the 22 words and the addition of the date: 72+22+9=103 Shakespeare in simple cipher, conveying the concealed cryptographic message that Francis Bacon is Shakespeare. 

The title page is adorned with what appears to be sixteen elaborate decorative images which on closer inspection are representations of the letters FB for Francis Bacon (some of which are mirror images). It should be noted that the whole page contains 141 letters which when added to the 16 'FB's' equals 157 Fra Rosicrosse in simple cipher.

 

 

  

Decameron.png

Good evening A Phoenix. I just have to say that this is Fabulously Brilliant !!! ❤️

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46 minutes ago, Kate said:

Did anyone have any thoughts on the word on the clothing? K6B97B2CD-5DE2-4833-B45C-70B21F6BF399.jpeg.0ef4873585053ca4799c88ace312af17.jpeg

Hi Kate, I am not sure for the text bacause I think that it is easy to see what we want to see.

You say that you see "SAIRNO".

If we admit that this is not a O but a C, and taking in count what looks like an "f" on its right, we have "SAIRNCF" that is an angram of "FRANCIS" !

In contrast (in both senses of the word 😀), I clearly see a face.

And I don't know why but my first thought was " MEDUSA".

image.png.ffb0df27e1fa6c4358cb2f794c551fc8.png

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