Jump to content

The Shepheardes Calender - Francis Bacon cipher


Recommended Posts

Revisiting a topic that has come up before...

The Shepheardes Calender

While looking at a cryptic poem Kate posted with an obvious hidden meaning, on yet another thread, while looking at Shepherd clues, I stumbled back on Spenser's The Shepheardes Calender. 

A search on SirBacon.org the works come up:

https://sirbacon.org/mspenser.htm

Elizabeth Wells Gallup:

https://sirbacon.org/galllup.html

"Bacon saw that by method in the arrangement of these two forms of letters already at hand, a cipher could be enclosed in the printed page, yet attract no attention--that it would be absolutely undiscoverable without the key--- and he incorporated a communication in his first book, The Shepherds' Calendar of 1579. The success and secrecy of his plan became at once apparent, and it was continued in his writings. Publishers of other books observed the permanence of "the new fashion" of two forms of type, and followed it for no particular reason, until a considerable part of the literature of the day appeared in this mixed form. The larger the number printed in this manner, with no method in the arrangement of letters, the greater the safety of the hidden matter in those of Bacon; and the disclosures show that he, becoming bolder, ventured to place the gravest secrets of his life in this two-formed type..."

I haven't spent time researching this book, but today took a quick peek.

The Title page has your basic "by" or "both", "At", Conteyning" Bacon cipher. We see so many examples not even worth a screenshot, but you can look:

https://archive.org/details/cu31924013125418/page/n33/mode/2up

The next page, though, that Yann demonstrated a few weeks ago:

https://archive.org/details/cu31924013125418/page/n35/mode/2up

The poem is curious and Yann (Allisnum2er) worked with it a while back providing valuable fruit.  (See above link in another thread.)

Today, it landed here in my face and it had new interest. I'm not trying to be redundant, but a "fresh" look in its own thread.

image.png.f00b1cbc389bb60da7bcfdedce7953a2.png

"But if any aske thy name,"

But
Sa
For
And
Com
And I will

Perfect anagram using only the first few letters of the lines after one "askes thy name":

FS BACON AND WILLIAM TUDOR

I'm yet to dig into what has been said already in the Baconian history, but for we here now kicking ideas around, did Bacon write "The Shepheardes Calender"?

Elizabeth Gallup says so, "and he incorporated a communication in his first book, The Shepherds' Calendar of 1579".

But I have not dug in. Spenser was mentioned in yet another thread today on B' Hive that Bacon may have wrote some of Spenser's works.

Yea, another "Can o' Worms", but so many things weave together!

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Light-of-Truth
  • Like 2

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

"But if any aske thy name,"

But
Sa
For
And
Com
And I will

Perfect anagram using only the first few letters of the lines after one "askes thy name":

FS BACON AND WILLIAM TUDOR

I'm yet to dig into what has been said already in the Baconian history, but for we here now kicking ideas around, did Bacon write "The Shepheardes Calender"?

Elizabeth Gallup says so, "and he incorporated a communication in his first book, The Shepherds' Calendar of 1579".

But I have not dug in. Spenser was mentioned in yet another thread today on B' Hive that Bacon may have wrote some of Spenser's works.

Yea, another "Can o' Worms", but so many things weave together!

This "fresh" look is very welcome !

I think you've hit the nail right on the head. Well done Rob !!! 😃 

  • Like 2

image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...