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Concise List of Discoveries in the Sonnet Pyramid(s)


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I would propose to start a topic where we all list the major and minor discoveries of the Sonnet Pyramid(s). Because we all know how crafty the good old Bacon was. I dare to say, many Secrets he has hidden! Together we can find them all and form something like a "collective B`hive-Mind" of the Mystery of the Sonnets which is available for all serious Mystery-Seekers. I can only imagine how beautifully we could discover more secrets together, when one seeker finds one clue, and another has the follow up which explains more about it.

Also for Beginners who work with the Pyramid, it would be very helpful to see through all these Discoveries the Methods with which we can uncover the secret numbers and messages.

Maybe it would be also more "tidy" to present the Methods by example here and a concise list of the discoveries somewhere in another topic.


I have to say about myself: I am not an experienced decryption/decipher master. But I am a passionate Mystery-Lover, holistic Thinker and Mathematician. So I definitely would be full of joy to discover what our good Forefather has found and hidden.
Good Day and Blessings to all of you!

Edited by kerneatsbacon
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Love the idea myself!

As far as a concept of the "Sonnets Pyramid", my own discovery which has not taken root yet is what I know. On the other hand, I think in 2010 a scholar named Alastair Fowler published a book called "Triumphal Forms" and he describes the Sonnets as having a "pyramid" structure. I have the book and have read it, fascinating, but not the same thing I found. However, if I go back and study it more I may be able to relate it more with my own work.

His book gained attention with the Marlow camp and they have some comments on his idea of the pyramid. For example:

"One piece of recent scholarship that has disclosed unambiguous method in the apparent madness comes from Alastair Fowler. He approached the Sonnets from the angle of Renaissance esotericism and was particularly concerned with their structural and numerical properties. Noting that, “The most subtle and conceited of all numerological patterns are those in the sonnet sequences of the late sixteenth century” (1), Fowler went on to demonstrate the way in which Shakespeare’s sequence, “abounds in the intricate formal devices requisite to its genre” (2). In particular, Fowler showed how the three irregular sonnets (numbers 99, 126, 145) are all meticulously placed when the sonnets are arrayed as a Pythagorean pebble triangle of base seventeen. This ‘pyramidal’ form reflects the poet’s intention that his work stand as an enduring monument to his love.

For all the light that Fowler has been able to shed on the architectural design of the Sonnets, his numerological cue has not been taken very much further. One possible means by which this might be done is via the cabalistic practice of gematria – counting words according to the value of their component letters and using this as a means to transmit covert meaning. There is clear evidence that gematria exercised the minds of poets both before and after Shakespeare’s time."

I find the "Marlow" as Shakespeare theory interesting, but the evidence is not there. Baconian evidence is made of marble. Yet the Marlovians appear to be maybe one step ahead on Baconians as far as the numerological structure of the Sonnets. Not that their candidate is the true author, but they see what we are not paying attention to as much. Maybe, we do have some brilliant Baconians on the team, we're just scattered about on different paths to the same goal. 🙂

But this is book worth reading. The Sonnets were only one chapter and what Fowler describes is a wider Elizabethan style where "time" is important, even down to hours and minutes as they relate to lines in stanzas, etc. That for me has helped validate my own discoveries. And also that it was not only Bacon/Shakespeare doing this kind of work.

This is the overview of the book on Amazon:

"A study of numerology in Elizabethan poetry, with some background studies which base the subject in classical learning, the works of Dante and Petrarch, and the esoteric traditions of the humanists. The central assumption of numerological criticism is that there exist works written in this tradition which show a correspondence between structure and meaning on a numerical plane; that is, one in which the number of the constituent parts (lines, stanzas, sonnets in a sequence) expresses a major aspect of the meaning. For instance parts of the whole can be arranged to represent months of the year and so on. Such structures of time and the triumphal form, in which the most important 'sovereign' element is placed at the centre, are the two main numerological patterns discussed by Dr Fowler. Critics have tended to regard numerology as an isolated phenomenon, rare after the Middle Ages but Dr Fowler demonstrates its persistence in the works of Spenser, Sidney, Chapman, Shakespeare, Donne, Jonson, Dryden and others."

https://www.amazon.com/Triumphal-Forms-Structural-Patterns-Elizabethan/dp/052112896X

 

 

 

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But I am a passionate Mystery-Lover, holistic Thinker and Mathematician. So I definitely would be full of joy to discover what our good Forefather has found and hidden.

As a follow up...

During my first years, reading Alfred Dodd, Peter Dawkins, and many other great books, including the very simple "Secret Shakespearean Seals" they set my path. Dodd introduced me to Bacon's life, Dawkins encouraged me to pursue the "treasure hunt", the Seals had me searching for the numbers 157 and 287. Granted I spent a few years before I found much that I thought important. But I learned a lot, and enjoyed every moment.

I also read some Pike during this early time.

What worked for me is actually described by some esoteric writers. You do you work, "winding a spring". Sometimes it seems to have no purpose, but that spring gets wound. Then you pause, you contemplate. For me I'd spend a week seeking, making notes, finding little things. Then on every Thursday I'd write what I found. That is when I learned what I actually found. It would flow out of me onto paper by pen. As if my brain was releasing what I did not even know I knew!

Strange, but after a couple years or so it all made sense and I trusted that method. That's when it really started to work. Big time. 😉

 

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Okay there are definitely some new recourses I can look into. Thanks, Rob, for sharing your insights. Wow yeah this seems as if you got always little puzzle pieces that do not make sense alone but together they give the picture. 

I have a question to you about numerology. Which Ciphers died Bacon mainly use? and additionally:
-Do you think it is worth it to look through the Sonnets with Ciphers using the 26 letter alphabet or only 24? I mean the first Key Table you give us is with 26 Letters. So it must have some significance.
-Have you ever heard of the 369 St. Germain Cipher where A=6, B=12, C=18,and so on? Do you think it plays any significance in the Sonnets?
So yes I guess the essence of this Post is which Ciphers to use to uncover the Secrets. Though I am sure there must hints from Bacon which Ciphers to use. You brought a good example in your articles on light-of-truth.org  where you demonstrated correspondences of the Simple, Short, Reverse and Kaye. Are these the only ciphers you used?

Treasure Hunt !! :classic_biggrin:

 

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2 hours ago, kerneatsbacon said:

Okay there are definitely some new recourses I can look into. Thanks, Rob, for sharing your insights. Wow yeah this seems as if you got always little puzzle pieces that do not make sense alone but together they give the picture. 

I have a question to you about numerology. Which Ciphers died Bacon mainly use? and additionally:
-Do you think it is worth it to look through the Sonnets with Ciphers using the 26 letter alphabet or only 24? I mean the first Key Table you give us is with 26 Letters. So it must have some significance.
-Have you ever heard of the 369 St. Germain Cipher where A=6, B=12, C=18,and so on? Do you think it plays any significance in the Sonnets?
So yes I guess the essence of this Post is which Ciphers to use to uncover the Secrets. Though I am sure there must hints from Bacon which Ciphers to use. You brought a good example in your articles on light-of-truth.org  where you demonstrated correspondences of the Simple, Short, Reverse and Kaye. Are these the only ciphers you used?

Treasure Hunt !! :classic_biggrin:

 

As far as Bacon using one more than another, I can't say. When I started out all I used was the 24 letter alphabet ciphers and found a lot. When I started using the 26 modern ciphers I found several places where they worked along with the 24 letter alphabet.

Rick Wagner uses the Pythagorean ciphers and he has found a lot of great clues. It is basically the same as the Short cipher, but is unique as well.

I have spent countless hours seeking a biliteral cipher message that Bacon described it in his works. I was using the first letters of the lines of the Sonnets "W" and "T" as so many lines of the Sonnets begin with those letters. More than chance would allow in my opinion. I tried "W" as "1", and "T" as "0", and vice-versa. At one point I found the word "STAR" come up and was very excited. And from what I remember it was in an important place where it made sense in the words of the Sonnets. I described the find into a letter I wrote and sent out, but I guess I did not keep a note to myself. I've looked for years now and cannot find the place, but I am sure it is there somewhere.

Nowadays I mostly spend my time working my "day job" for whatever pay I can scrape in, taking care of people in my life who have needs, feeding the cat, dog, etc. From about 1998 to 2004 I lived a cheap single lifestyle and spent my days focused on Bacon. Now it is something I do when I have time, which is sporadic.

Me, I mostly use the 24 and 26 letter ciphers codes with all four; Simple, Short, Reverse, and Kaye. However, word and letter counts are one of my favorite tools as well. That's why I emphasize having a facsimile available of the Sonnets and the First Folio. I also own a facsimile of the original KJV. When available, like the Sonnets, it is handy to copy and paste original text into to Word and use Word's review feature with letter, word, and line count. 

For instance, it is a fun lesson to look for the word "Rose" and also the word "Cross." How many words between, how many lines, etc. Hint: 157 does pop up. In fact, I've done that search in several places just for fun, like working a cross-word puzzle or something. Starting tool:

https://www.rhymezone.com/shakespeare/

and original text of the First Folio:

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Foyer/Texts/index.html

the Sonnets:

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/doc/Son_Q1/complete/index.html

If you start with modern text, you also need to check the original text as sometimes there is a difference and we want to use the original.

It takes practice, but once you hone your skills, there is no limit to what you might seek and find. 

 

 

Edited by Light-of-Truth
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