Jump to content

Francis Bacon's Portraits


Recommended Posts

51 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

We missed you Yann! Hope your headaches have gone away.

I've thought about you and your skills several times recently whishing I could do the same. LOL

 

 

 

Thank you Rob and A Phoenix ! ❤️ You missed me too ! The withdrawal was difficult but was necessary and bore its fruits. 🙂 I am delighted to be with you again.

  • Like 3

image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Reproduced in the Phoenixes' illuminating paper, "Francis Bacon's Death" is an engraving of Lord Bacon by Crispijn van de Passe the Younger (c. 1597-1670) which I'd never seen before. Except for one thing, it's a fairly faithful copy of an earlier engraving by his brother, Simon (1595-1647). The difference is noticeable at once: Francis's face has aged dramatically. Why would Crispijn van de Passe meticulously reproduce his older brother's engraving and at the same time deliberately age his sitter by a good twenty years? Any theories?

image.png.8a2a8a8d99bfa77b9bea84d964e94f37.png

image.png.cd4fdd830edd9893b0f6470787745852.png

Unlike his brother, Simon, Crispijn never came to England, but like his father, Crispijn van de Passe the Elder (1564-1637), produced engravings for the English market while being based on the Continent (Utrecht, Amsterdam, Paris, Cologne, etc.) It is not impossible that he could have known Lord Bacon - after he left England to live incognito in Europe. It just might be a rendering from life. Who knows? I don't think it's because Crispijn was incompetent that the two faces are so alike, yet so different. And why has the famous hat - which appears in every portrait of Bacon except the one at Gorhambury - been removed? 

  • Wow! 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also in the Phoenixes' paper, "Francis Bacon's Death" is this brief statement regarding the monumental marble sculpture of Lord Bacon in St Michael's Church, St Albans. "There seems every chance that Inigo Jones and Nicholas Stone were directly involved in the design and construction of the Bacon monument at St Michael’s Church". The inscription states that the sculpture was installed in its niche in the same year that Bacon supposedly died. If as it appears, this is so, that the sculpture was carved by Nicholas Stone, perhaps the foremost "mason-sculptor" of his day, in the same year that he became by royal appointment "master mason and architect" to Windsor Castle (in 1632 he succeeded William Cure as Master Mason to the Crown) then we can assume that the face of the sculpture is a good likeness. In fact, one could say it is an almost contemporary portrait of a Rosicrucian Master, Lord Bacon, by two of his devoted and highly talented Brothers.

Unfortunately, no one has apparently bothered to photographically document the sculpture in situ properly. We cannot get a good look at the face. A pity, since this might be the closest we can get to seeing the real Francis Bacon as his friends knew him before he disappeared. Here's the best image I could find.

image.png.058644c321b281455ab0006e01ebe378.png

I wonder if Francis actually posed for his own funerary monument?

 

Edited by Eric Roberts
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Eric,

Brilliant spot and analysis.

I think you are first in history to place this engraving by Crispijn van de Passe in its proper context relating to Lord Bacon and his supposed death in 1626. We agree with you that it is intended to represent an older looking Lord Bacon and it is entirely possible that it is meant to convey to the initiated and to posterity for those with eyes to see that FB did not die in 1626 but travelled abroad where he lived for a long time thereafter.  

The removal of the hat is also indeed very curious. . .

Great work Eric!👍

Edited by A Phoenix
  • Thanks 1
  • Wow! 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Eric,

I second The Phoenixes. Many thanks for this brilliant analysis.❤️

To answer your questions, here are some ideas ...

The "young/old" Bacon could also be related to Janus. 

Janus_and_Bellona%2C_Sch%C3%B6nbrunn_Garden.JPG

[[File:Janus and Bellona, Schönbrunn Garden.JPG Janus and Bellona, Schönbrunn Garden]]

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Janus_and_Bellona,_Schönbrunn_Garden.JPG?uselang=fr

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.fr

It reminds me the "Janus-like" Portrait of Milton ...

1024px-1645_Titlepage.JPG

The original uploader was Esquilax8 at English Wikipedia., Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1645_Titlepage.JPG

And regarding Francis Bacon's hat , I think that there is a connection with both the sculpture of Lord Bacon in St Michael's Church, St Albans (with the hat), and its "copy" in Trinity College (without the hat).

File:Statue of Francis Bacon in Trinity College, Cambridge.jpg - Wikimedia  Commons

Vysotsky (Wikimedia), CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Statue_of_Francis_Bacon_in_Trinity_College,_Cambridge.jpg

Could it be a reference to the Twins , like  with the Shakespeare's Monument in Westminster Abbey and the Statue of William Shakespeare at the Wilton House ?

See the work of Peter Dawkins on the Dark Twin and the Light Twin :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5VBuepP3n80

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1bGfpjVbA2E

By the way, regarding the sculpture of Lord Bacon in St Michael's Church, "The marble tomb was erected by the care and gratitude of Sir Thomas Meautys, Knight, Bacon's secretary"

https://sirbacon.org/links/tomb.html

Here is a portrait of Sir Thomas Meautys by Daniel Mytens (c. 1590 - 1647/48)

https://www.meisterdrucke.fr/fine-art-prints/Daniel-Mytens/243612/Sir-Thomas-Meautys-(d.1649).html

I found the dart/spear that he hold in his right hand interesting.

Could it be a clue ?

 

 

  • Wow! 3

image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry for being a little off topic.

This is something regarding the epitath that had very probably already been found, but I have just realized it ... 

https://www.hertsmemories.org.uk/content/herts-history/topics/literary_hertfordshire/francis-bacon/st-michaels-church-st-albans

FRANCISCO BACON BARO DE VERULA S ALB VIC
SEV NOTIORIBUS TITULIS
SCIENTIARUM LUMEN FACUNDIAE LEX
SIC SEDEBAT


QVI POSTQVAM OMNIA NATVRALIS SAPIENTIAE
ET CIVILIS ARCANA EVOLVISSET
NATVRAE DECRETVM EXPLEVIT
COMPOSITA SOLVANTVR
ANO DNI MDCXXVI

AETAT LXVI

 

First line ...

image.png

 

74 = WILLIAM = TUDOR (simple cipher)

178 = WILL TUDOR (Kay cipher)

173 # R.C.

image.png.962f5d89aa58e82d67cc238c769c10c7.png

157 = FRA ROSI CROSSE = WILLIAM TUDOR I (simple cipher)

 

Edited by Allisnum2er
  • Like 2
  • Wow! 1

image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

Hi Eric,

I second The Phoenixes. Many thanks for this brilliant analysis.❤️

To answer your questions, here are some ideas ...

The "young/old" Bacon could also be related to Janus. 

Janus_and_Bellona%2C_Sch%C3%B6nbrunn_Garden.JPG

[[File:Janus and Bellona, Schönbrunn Garden.JPG Janus and Bellona, Schönbrunn Garden]]

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Janus_and_Bellona,_Schönbrunn_Garden.JPG?uselang=fr

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.fr

It reminds me the "Janus-like" Portrait of Milton ...

1024px-1645_Titlepage.JPG

The original uploader was Esquilax8 at English Wikipedia., Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1645_Titlepage.JPG

And regarding Francis Bacon's hat , I think that there is a connection with both the sculpture of Lord Bacon in St Michael's Church, St Albans (with the hat), and its "copy" in Trinity College (without the hat).

File:Statue of Francis Bacon in Trinity College, Cambridge.jpg - Wikimedia  Commons

Vysotsky (Wikimedia), CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Statue_of_Francis_Bacon_in_Trinity_College,_Cambridge.jpg

Could it be a reference to the Twins , like  with the Shakespeare's Monument in Westminster Abbey and the Statue of William Shakespeare at the Wilton House ?

See the work of Peter Dawkins on the Dark Twin and the Light Twin :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5VBuepP3n80

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1bGfpjVbA2E

By the way, regarding the sculpture of Lord Bacon in St Michael's Church, "The marble tomb was erected by the care and gratitude of Sir Thomas Meautys, Knight, Bacon's secretary"

https://sirbacon.org/links/tomb.html

Here is a portrait of Sir Thomas Meautys by Daniel Mytens (c. 1590 - 1647/48)

https://www.meisterdrucke.fr/fine-art-prints/Daniel-Mytens/243612/Sir-Thomas-Meautys-(d.1649).html

I found the dart/spear that he hold in his right hand interesting.

Could it be a clue ?

 

 

Thank you, Allisnum2er for all your information, clues, etc. The portrait by Mytens of Meautys is magnificent - what an outlandish outfit! Also, the fact that the Cambridge copy of the St Michael's statue is sans hat IS very odd. Like his shoe roses, I read somewhere that Bacon's beaver fur hat also had Rosicrucian significance - a symbol of his Grand Master status, perhaps? The removal of the hat could indicate that he no longer retains that role. (Cf. the two engravings by the van de Passe brothers of Lord Bacon with and without a hat.) I'll try to find out more about the Cambridge copy of the statue and get back to you soon.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Allisnum2er said:

Eric, A Phoenix, Rob, I have just found that !!! 😃

 

Does Francis Bacon look in the sky or does he look the stained glasses on his left ? 😉

 

"Does Francis Bacon look in the sky or does he look the stained glasses on his left ?

Hi Yann. You raise an interesting point. In both the St Michael's and Trinity College statues, Francis is depicted not with his eyes closed as if sleeping - which presumably would have been more conventional - but with his eyes open, staring into space, in the act of contemplation. Is this not a little unusual for a funerary monument? The statue shows Bacon as alive, not dead. 

image.jpeg.11ca92d7d782736ed6682ee9f878d1a4.jpeg

While on the subject of tombs, circa 1880 permission was given by Queen Victoria to Mr A Stanley to make a survey of the tombs of Westminster Abbey. In one of the vaults he discovered the coffins of sister Queens Mary and Elizabeth. Elizabeth's coffin was identified by a carving of a rose on the lid and the initials E.R. It could simply mean that she was of the House of Tudor, but it could also allude to secrecy.

image.png.333cf2cbd8c23f1fe900dede5d94024d.png

https://thetudortravelguide.com/2019/07/20/the-death-and-burial-of-elizabeth-i/

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another shot of Henry Weekes' 1845 copy of the St Michael's monument, and an extract from a letter Francis wrote to the Deans of Cambridge:

Letter of Francis, Baron Verulam, and Viscount St Albans, to the famous College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, Cambridge: ‘All things owe their existence and their progress to their beginnings; and, having drunk the first sips of knowledge from your springs, I feel that I should repay to you their increase.  I hope that my studies will flourish with you in a similar way, since Trinity is their native soil.  Wherefore I urge you, while retaining your modesty and res-pect for the ancients, not to cease from the furtherance of science as well; and to study diligently first the sacred volumes of the word of God and the Scriptures, and next to them the great volume of the works of God and his creation; all other books should be held to be mere aids to understanding these.  Farewell.’

image.png.2e84dac0219b9c163f007d467824a06b.png

  • Wow! 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi everyone,

I would like to share with you something that I have just found.

This is probably already known by the Baconians, but just in case ...

My last research led me to Scévole de Saint Marthe.

Scévole de Saint Marthe led me to the University of Poitiers.

https://www.univ-poitiers.fr/choisir-luniversite/decouvrir-luniversite-de-poitiers/histoire-depuis-1431/

And Francis Bacon also studied for a time at the Universty of Poitiers when he was in France between 1576 and 1579.

On the book cover at the bottom of the web page, I recognized

Francis Bacon at the foot of the Statue of Minerva, the Spear-shaker,  with the missing arm holding her spear.

And on the left of BACON we have a reference to ... HAMLET !😀

Moreover, if we count Minerva as one of the characters, there are 33 characters in total.

The fresco was painting by Pierre Girieud  in 1931 .

 

image.png.d536d0643c078b1059cabe2a3d4326e6.png

Edited by Allisnum2er
  • Like 1
  • Wow! 2

image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, Allisnum2er said:

This is probably already known by the Baconians, but just in case ...

I did not know. You made me laugh!

Watching the video I tried to imagine Bacon young and eager, like all these beautiful students learning anything and everything available. Very nice image!

Synchronicity I was poking around randomly in the Plays and this line in Hamlet caught my attention:

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/doc/Ham_F1/page/10/index.html

Lord Hamlet is a Prince out of thy Starre,

And then I check the B'Hive and you share an image of Bacon as a student in Francis sitting next to Hamlet.

A few moments before I stumbled on this Hamlet line, I was for the first time learning that the French word "Dauphin" is also "Dolphin". Imagine my head swimming on that one. LOL

 

 

  • Haha 2

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

Link to comment
Share on other sites

34 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

A few moments before I stumbled on this Hamlet line, I was for the first time learning that the French word "Dauphin" is also "Dolphin". Imagine my head swimming on that one. LOL

Hi Rob, for the anecdote (and the synchronicity) here is an emblem taken from a page of the book that led me to Scévole de Sainte Marthe (knowing that Dictynna is mentionned on the same page 😉

image.png.34e3a7cb8a8d2d1998c42f2984388535.png

Notice the "back conies" the 33 formed by the two forks and the two "DOLPHIN"s (DOLPHIN=74)

I will share with you the other discoveries made in this book later.

  • Wow! 2

image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Regarding the 32+1 (Minerva) characters on the fresco and the reference to Hamlet , it reminded me that The Tragedy of Hamlet was the 32nd Play of the First Folio.

As I was taking a look at the Catalogue of the Plays on page 17 of the First Folio, something caught my eyes, something that I had missed until today ...

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/17/index.html%3fzoom=1275.html

image.png.10293bed5444e113bdb565822bba0fd4.png

Edited by Allisnum2er
  • Wow! 2

image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

40 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Gazing at this image of Bacon. I am pointing to a few things that catch my eye...

image.png.6ae91e0c3c4626387fd5725d213671b6.png

Edit:

image.png.134c157675eb4d694f13172564f21cce.png

Regarding the date, it says that between 1577 and 1578 Francis Bacon stays in Poitiers and frequentes student circles of the Law School.

Edit : Notice that both Francis Bacon and "Hamlet" wear a blue garment ! 😉 

Edited by Allisnum2er
  • Thanks 1

image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

30 minutes ago, Allisnum2er said:

Regarding the 32+1 (Minerva) characters on the fresco and the reference to Hamlet , it reminded me that The Tragedy of Hamlet was the 32nd Play of the First Folio.

As I was taking a look at the Catalogue of the Plays on page 17 of the First Folio, something caught my eyes, something that I had missed until today ...

https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/17/index.html%3fzoom=1275.html

image.png.10293bed5444e113bdb565822bba0fd4.png

152 is the Kaye cipher WILLIAM. Just to toss that out there.

The number 152 is a number we know, here is one example:

 

  • Like 2

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Allisnum2er said:

I asked myself the same question ! 🙂 

My initial split-second thought was the "High Priestess." But with the hanging lamp I cannot tell if this figure is male or female. And the images I Googled rarely have the High Priestess with her arms raised.

So I think I was mistaken. 😉

 

  • Like 2

T A A A A A A A A A A A T
157     www.Light-of-Truth.com     287
<-- 1 8 8 1 1
O 1 1 8 8 1 -->

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, Light-of-Truth said:

My initial split-second thought was the "High Priestess." But with the hanging lamp I cannot tell if this figure is male or female. And the images I Googled rarely have the High Priestess with her arms raised.

So I think I was mistaken. 😉

 

My initial split-second thought was "Diane de Poitiers" (Diane/Artemis/Luna/Dictynna/Britomartis/ Queen Elizabeth) but I probably confuse my wishes with reality 😅

Blog J&L Paris - Diane de Poitiers, du père au fils?!

https://www.jl-paris.com/paris-blog-lifestyle-culture-art/gossip-fr/diane-de-poitiers/

  • Like 2

image.png.b8c74f56d5551c745119c268cf9d3db8.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...