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The Alan Green Geometry Discovery


Kate
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This post is written because I’m always keen to ferret out the facts and certainly not written to cast any aspersions on Mr Green or his intent, findings or theory.

Alan Green has a very popular video where he sets out a sacred geometry code he thinks he’s found hidden on the front page of the Sonnets. It was pointed out to me that there are two front page versions, one longer than the one Alan used.

EA127D51-D10D-4158-AE45-952047C52B14.jpeg.ff3333ce52173d4e0cc752bf84fcad2b.jpeg


CD31AC84-A892-427B-A855-1278C4234D8C.jpeg.576f2b96934bd69cde14bad0ce30bdcf.jpeg

and so I wrote to the Folger Library to find out which came first. 

I’ve now had a reply:

“Thank you for reaching out to us with your question. Your question has been passed over to us here in the reference department. 

The answer to your question is found in the way a book came to publication in early modern England. You'll see that both versions say that they were printed "AT LONDON By G. Eld for T.T." In this case, from other documentation, we know that T.T. was Thomas Thorpe, the person who actually held the rights to print the Sonnets and would have been the one to put up the money to have the book printed. George Eld was the one who actually did the printing. The difference between the two versions comes in where it was to be sold - one version was to be sold by John Wright, while the other was to be sold by William Aspley. Thorpe would have made arrangements with both of those bookshop owners ahead of time, and including their names on the title pages was a bit of free adversing for them - which was in everyone's best interest!

It's not really possible to know which version was printed first - and in fact, it's probable they were printed at the same time. There aren't really any substantive differences between the versions, so it seems likely that all of the pages of poems were printed at the same time and then assembled with two different title pages.

Best,

Abbie Weinberg
Research and Reference Librarian
Folger Shakespeare Library”

This concurs with what I had also found in a book preview that I posted elsewhere on this forum, which also suggests they were printed together.

EF1C2ABE-A620-4F3B-A897-C7E8B79C4550.jpeg.2d52ba278f2af12373b390b6a7833e24.jpegC23E660C-D800-409C-BA59-3717326C7448.jpeg.9d81f235d71f83ab87f6b95fe027f768.jpeg

Book link https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=79iTrQXBb0AC&printsec=frontcover&dq=google+books+%2B+NCS:+The+Sonnets+2ed+-+The+New+Cambridge+Shakespeare&hl=en&sa=X&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false

It’s interesting there were two, as duality was/is such a big thing to the Rosicrucian/Freemasonic community. 
 

Just as there are two of the same image (engravings) of Shakespeare with his family and only one has hidden letters and a portrait, it may well be that only one of the covers had the Sacred Geometry code that Alan detected, but it is important that people know there were two imprints so they can make up their own mind. He may mention it? I’m not sure.

Being a critical thinker, the same geometry needs to be applied to both to see if it is only on one, but I can’t see how it would replicate as the Wright version is longer and if I overlay them there appears to be fairly large differences.

You can view Alan’s geometric finding on Google images or by visiting this link and scrolling down

https://medium.com/@BardCode/heist-2-25a0bc92c3cc

Kate  

Edited by Kate Cassidy
Removed typo
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  • Kate changed the title to The Alan Green Geometry Discovery

Here is Alan Green's design:

image.png.b461b9555143b06c3b0a67457453c36c.png

Note the circumference of his circle includes the period after Imprinted, the G, Aspley, and 1609.

With the Christ Church version it is not possible. You can use the Imprinted and G periods only. The other periods won't line up perfectly with the circumference. The period after Gate seems to touch the circumference, but is not in it.

If we ignore the 1609 period and use the Imprinted and G periods to draw the diameter, we do still have some triangles that Alan talks about. We lose some others, for example the two metre triangles and the one he labeled cubit..

image.thumb.png.d0b9c8653109a05dd6e87810e08a40dd.png

Maybe the best was to see the differences is with an animation. You will also notice a slight variation in the type positions. I lined up with the two lines and the "Never before Imprinted" text, but you can see how the lower text shifts. So there are subtle differences in versions available for us to use.

sonnets-compared.gif.f98ab41279918f00a1b80ab77d728a35.gif

In both versions using the Imprinted and G periods for the diameter of the circle and using the horizontal lines provides some good triangles. But the Christ Church version does not have the Aspley and 1609 periods available in the circumference for the other triangles. We could draw a line from the 1609 period to the Imprinted and use the intersection point of the circumference and make a triangle very close to one the metre triangles, but not exact.

EDIT: I just want to note that the facsimiles I've seen online are slightly different as far as being exactly lined up the same. One would need to use an actual original copy of the Sonnets to measure perfectly as the scans may distort the page a little. The overall concepts could be there, but very precise modern day measurements would be impossible with a scanned copy.

Edited by Light-of-Truth
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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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I guess I should be clear that we could make a circle that has the Imprinted, G, and 1609 periods in the circumference. However, the line from Imprinted to G would NOT be the diameter and all the right triangles are blown out of the water. So this circle does not work at all.

image.png.89d16efebf296d437bae27847b6dc03d.png

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T A A A A A A A A A A A T
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<-- 1 8 8 1 1
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