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Posted (edited)

Just stumbled on this Double A headpiece in a 1607 book by Edward Topsell:

https://www.loc.gov/resource/rbctos.2017gen58402c2/?sp=23&st=image&r=-0.027,-0.045,0.964,0.792,0

image.png.4fcd8e5c38b01dc5b056dde72d8ca616.png

I was actually following leads regarding a winged serpent, an Amphiptere, and ended up here. Mather Walker mentions the headpiece as being a source for much of Bacon's animal lore in Shakespeare.

About this Item

 

Title

The historie of serpents; or The seconde booke of liuing creatures ... Collected out of diuine Scriptures, Fathers, phylosophers, physitians and poets.

Other Title

Historie of serpents; or The seconde booke of living creatures

Historie of serpents

Seconde booke of living creatures

Contributor Names

Topsell, Edward, 1572-1625?

English Printing Collection (Library of Congress)

Theodore Roosevelt Hunting Library (Library of Congress)

Created / Published

London, Printed by W. Jaggard, 1608.

Subject Headings

-  Serpents

-  Zoology--Pre-Linnean works

 

 

 

EDIT: From Mather Walker:

https://sirbacon.org/mcompeer3of3.htm

One of the arguments against Bacon’s connection to the device publications is that they included inferior, ordinary works, Bacon was unlikely to have been associated with. This overview would be incomplete without glancing at some of these publications. In part 1 of the present Compeers articles I have referred to the fact that my penpal, Glen Claston, objected to the idea that Bacon could have associated with the following two works because he considered them inferior writings:

“The historie of fovre-footed beastes. Collected out of all the volumes of Conradvs Gesner, and all other writers to this present day”, by Topsell, Edward 1607. London. Printed by William Iaggard. 1607 ---Arche

“The Historie of Serpents: or, the Second Booke of liuing Creatures”, by Topsell, Edward 1608, London. Printed by William Iaggard 1608 --- Archer

However, as I also pointed out, these same works provided most of the beast lore that Bacon used in his Shakespeare writings.

 

Edited by Light-of-Truth
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Interesting article about Topsell's book:

https://ojs.library.dal.ca/tandc/article/download/4249/4230

Curious the Double A. "The historie of fovre-footed beastes" has an emblematic viewpoint of Nature which is the opposite of what Bacon's scientific method reveals. OK, it's not a scientific book. Yet maybe it is another books with secrets.

Light A, Dark A?

Maybe this is the inspiration for the Shakespeare engraving that appeared in the First Folio? I see a resemblance.

image.png.5f15e6a0456e471fd48fa8dd9fae6f0d.png

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I decided to take a look at the page 666 because of the recent recurrence of this number, and I noticed that the page was in the chapter dedicated to ... THE SWINE !

By browsing the pages of this chapter I found ... BACON 😊

image.png.1074ea5e0a895688ca535158183e143d.png

https://www.loc.gov/resource/rbctos.2017gen58402c2/?sp=728&st=image&r=0.348,0.303,0.719,0.348,0

Topsell, E., English Printing Collection & Theodore Roosevelt Hunting Library. (1608) The historie of serpents; or The seconde booke of liuing creatures ... Collected out of diuine Scriptures, Fathers, phylosophers, physitians and poets. London, Printed by W. Jaggard. [Pdf] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/64058402/.

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7 hours ago, Light-of-Truth said:

Interesting article about Topsell's book:

https://ojs.library.dal.ca/tandc/article/download/4249/4230

Curious the Double A. "The historie of fovre-footed beastes" has an emblematic viewpoint of Nature which is the opposite of what Bacon's scientific method reveals. OK, it's not a scientific book. Yet maybe it is another books with secrets.

Light A, Dark A?

Maybe this is the inspiration for the Shakespeare engraving that appeared in the First Folio? I see a resemblance.

image.png.5f15e6a0456e471fd48fa8dd9fae6f0d.png

“Animals were living characters in the language of the Creator...” These ‘myriad hidden meanings’ are not ascribed by humans, but are inherent in animals themselves. In the emblematic worldview, knowledge of a more abstract divine truth could be communicated directly through animals.
For these meanings to be inherent, the symbolic worldview presupposes the existence of a superior spiritual realm, which for the Christian world meant God. Christianity supported the emblematic practice of looking beyond the natural and material world towards the intangible divine. Peter Harrison describes the long-standing Christian belief that God had imbued the material world with meaning, with the express purpose of guiding humans towards knowledge of the divine. In the Bible God commands Job to look towards animals: “But ask now the beasts and they will teach thee; and the fowls of the air, and they shall tell thee. Or speak to the earth, and it shall teach thee, and the fishes of the sea shall declare unto thee (12.7f.).”
 

Thus we know that God desires humans to study the natural world, but to appreciate its true meaning and gain real knowledge one has to look beyond outer appearances, to the inner symbolic significance. In other words, one must look at nature emblematically. Through an emblematic view one can learn about the Incarnation, Death, and Resurrection of Christ in how a lion covers his tracks (Christ hiding his divinity), and sleeps with his eyes open (Christ’s body dies yet he does not), and in how a young cub is woken by its father’s roar (as God revived Christ).7 The empirical truth of these behaviours was not as important as the spiritual meaning. The emblematic worldview, which takes animals as signs left by God to guide humans towards the divine, belongs to the Christian tradition of valuing the spirit over the body.
Through the emblematic worldview Topsell found moral truths hidden in the natural world. Revealing the moral lessons found in animals was one of the main goals of Topsell’s natural history. By studying animals, one could learn the correct way to behave as a human.”

Very interesting!  Thanks for this

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Kate said:

Very interesting!  Thanks for this

In some ways it reminds me of Wisdom of the Ancients.

A. Phoenix has demonstrated the connect between Bacon and the Jaggards. For me I don't have to stretch my imagination very much to be open to the idea that Bacon had some fingers in this book. Some of the verbiage in TO THE LEARNED Readers hints at other Authors.

https://www.loc.gov/resource/rbctos.2017gen58402c2/?sp=43&st=image&r=-0.059,0.175,0.893,0.714,0

And like Yann, I've seen what could be Bacon clues in key places.

https://www.loc.gov/resource/rbctos.2017gen58402c2/?sp=83&st=image&r=-0.54,-0.062,2.08,1.664,0

image.png.eb97bc1ef981832da610275f06be6bc1.png

Edited by Light-of-Truth
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