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A Phoenix

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  1. THE FOUR TRANSLATIONS OF THE MEMORIAE VERSES 1626 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  2. TRANSLATION OF E. K. RAND IV On the Death of the most honored Man and Lord, 1Sir2 Francis of Verulam, Viscount St. Alban, late Chancellor of England.3 Art thou still proud in insolent purple when the bier has robbed so many famed men,4 thou barren court? Thou shouldst give the day to haircloth and make to sackcloth all the pomp of the bar. Nor let Themis bear the hanging scales, but the urn, the weighty urn of Verulam. Then let her weigh.5 Alas, not Ephorus tips the beam, but Areopagus. Nor is so great a sage less than the barbarian porch;6 for your axis groaned, ye schools, when fell so great a pile; the very vault7 of the world of letters was dissolved, wherein, with equal zest, he graced the civic and the royal robe.8 Even as Eurydice, wandering through shades of Dis, longed to caress her Orpheus, and even as with winged hand-the while Styx leaped at last, scarce ruffled before-he strummed9 the fibres of his lyre, so did Philosophy, involved in scholars’10 riddles, call Bacon to her rescue; so by his touch entranced,11 she reared her crest: and as she crept along the ground in comic sock, he did not succor12 her with some device13 that gossips would approve,14 but made her wholly new. Then with more polished art, he rose in higher buskin, and the Stagerite, another Virbius,15 lives again in a new Organon. Columbus leaves Calpe and Abyla16 behind, with the proud oarage of Phoebus, destined by new arts to give man a new world; his youthful ardor advances his emprise even to the ruthless envy of a threatening fate. What old man, or what Hannibal, in fear of darkness for his only eye, fans the Suburra with his victorious standards?17 What Milo strong raises the wrath18 of oaks, when old age, weight heavier than a bull19 presses him down? The while our hero bestowed eternity upon the sciences, he was found, in truth, a readier artist of his own sepulchre.20 Calm speculation seemeth extasy, where-by the winged mind, to gaze on the Ideas of Good, hastens to Olympus’ milky paths. In these abodes21 it tarrieth as its house, a stranger with its own. It comes again.22 Playfully it flies away; again it wanders and again comes back; at last in earnest stealing away it utterly withdraws. Even so the soul quits the moaning, wasting corpse; so does it bid it die.23 Come then, ye Muses of Woe, and from the spurs of Libanus gather ye incense, let every star shower its sparks upon his pyre; be it a crime to light the pile of kings with flame of Prometheus from a kitchen hearth. And if perchance some breeze more wanton should play about his hallowed ashes and scatter them flying, then weep ye; your tears will flow in sequent globules to mutual embrace.24 Since then, the fundament of thy prison house is shattered utterly a second time, rise, happy soul, seek JAMES;25 show him that civic fidelity followeth even there. From the law’s tripod thou shalt utter oracles for Themis’ fosterlings. Thus, ye blest Heavenly Ones, may Astraea take pleasure in her ancient champion; or else, give ye Astraea back with Bacon. R. P. _____________________________________________________________________ 1. domini, in a general sense: something like ‘gentleman.’ 2. domini, in the sense noted on p. 4, n. 1. 3. The writer of this poem is an admirer of Juvenal, and catches at least the difficulties of that author’s style. 4. lit. ‘at the bier’s plundering against so many famed men.’ 5. cf. Juvenal, Sat. x. 147. 6. Porticus brac (c) ata (bracchata is a misprint) denotes the scholastic philosophy, for which ‘barbarian porch’is an apt designation. Meurer, p. 101, with less point adopts a contemporary sense of braccatus, sleeved. 7. cardo, V. Harper’s Lex. 1 B 2; the phrase then means, continuing the astronomical figure in axis, ‘the whole heavens fell in.’ Meurer, however, p. 109, restricting the meanings of both cardo and orbis litterarii, may be right in rendering ‘eurer litterarischer Kreis geht aus den Angeln’(‘Your literary circle goes off the hooks’). To Bormann, p. 15, cardo = Theaterdrehmaschine. 8. togam et trabeam, i. e. civil law and the history of princes (Henry VII.). Or it may refer to the lower and higher parts of philosophy, the practical and the speculative. Meurer, p. 109, translates ‘Richter und Rittertracht’ (‘robe of judge and of knight’). 9. lit. ‘tickled- an exaggeration characteristic of this writer. 10. philologwn: the schoolmen, ‘lovers of words,’ a phrase in the spirit of Mephistopheles’ “im Ganzen -haltet Euch an Worte,” etc. 11. lactata, gen. ‘cajoled,’ but here in a good sense. 12. lit. ‘patch.’ 13. lit. ‘undertaking. 14. i. e. he resorted to no half way, dilettante measures. 15. Hippolytus was raised from the dead and under the name of Virbius lived another life. Thus Bacon is an Aristoteles redivivus. 16. The two pillars of Hercules. 17. Illustration and phrasing from Juvenal. Sat. x. 156 f. Ventilat, ‘fans (i. e. ‘stirs’), is an example of the exaggeration of the writer’s style, which out-Juvenals Juvenal. 18. bilem, ‘spleen’-more tasteless imagery. The allusion is to Milo’s tragic end. 19. Alludes to the story of Milo’s carrying a heifer on his shoulders at the Stadium of Olympia-an achievement of his youth. 20. i. e. the old man of Verulam performed a task that called for the strength of a young hero (hence the point of the preceding illustration). Bacon’s great monument that he was rearing turned out to be his tomb. 21. i. e. on earth. 22. i. e. to its heavenly home. 23. Reason has appeared once or twice on earth in the person of Aristotle and other Sages; now at the demise of Bacon, its last incarnation, it leaves for good and all. 24. i. e. will chase each other down your cheeks. 25. James I. died 1625, the year before. 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  3. TRANSLATION OF THE BACON SOCIETY [ELEGY 4] On the death of the most honoured man and lord, Francis of Verulam, Viscount St. Alban, late Chancellor of England. Still dost thou flaunt in proud purple, and with the rapine of the bier against so many illustrious men, O barren Justice-hall!1 Name a day for the trial of the hair-cloth, and make the entire luxury of the Market-place a gart of woe!2 Let not the trembling balance be borne by Themis,3 but weigh the urn, the heavy urn of Verulam.4 Alas! it is not Ephorus who doth depress the scale, but Areopagus;5 nor is so great a sage inferior to the whole trousered Portico!6 For your axle, O schools of learning, groaneth, while so vast a mass cometh toppling down: the hinge is undone upon which revolves the great literary world; where he washed (cleansed) with equal earnestness his toga and his trabea.7 As once Eurydice, wandering through the gloomy realms of Dis, vainly endeavoured to touch Orpheus, with such hand-a winged hand-as once Orpheus gently swept the strings of the lyre, Styx, anon, scarce ruffled, now leaping to the sound: so did Philosophia, inextricably bound up in the riddles of those who play with words,8 seek BACON as her champion and avenger; by such a hand, cherished and preserved, hath she raised high her crest: and as he humbly crept upon the ground (wearing) the flat-foot sock of Comedy, with no meddling idle interference did he botch, but restored her (Comedy) completely afresh.9 Hence, still more polished does he rise on loftier buskin (of Tragedy), and the Stagyrite (Aristotle, Verbius-like},10 restored to life, flourished once more in the “New Organ.” Columbus, with proud oarage, vanquishes Gibraltar and Abyla, dear to Phoebus,11 destined to provide a new world for our new arts. His youthful eagerness furthers his bold designs, until (he evokes) the grudging envy of threatening Fate. What ancient carl,12 be he even a Hannibal fearing the darkness for his sole remaining eye, disturbs the sands with his conquering standards? What Milo13 unavenged moves our wrath against the (pitiless) oaks, when crook-backt old age presses heavier than a bull? Whilst our hero was handing down to us sciences from eternity, the builder of his own tomb14 is understood to be less encumbered (for the flight to heaven from the grave). His speculation appears to be a calm form of ecstacy (without its madness) by which the mind, gaining her wings, hasteth into the milky paths of Olympus, to view the idea (s) of the good. In these haunts she dwelleth as in her own house, a stranger in her accustomed place (i.e., on earth). She returns (at length): and again a fugitive, wandereth forth in sportive mood, and again hies12 her home. At length, with deliberate stealth, she withdraws herself entirely (from the world); so doth the soul renounce her companionship15 with the groaning and diseased body; so bids it die. Come now, ye Muses, with plaintive dirge heap incense from the Hills of Lebanon. On the pyre of our hero let the whole constellation shed its flames:16 let it be deemed a crime to kindle his bier, the bier of a second Prometheus, from a domestic (kitchen) hearth. Then if by chance some breeze grows more petulant, sports with those hallowed embers, and counsels them flight, then weep aloud; the sequacious drops shall run in your tears to fill your bosoms. Now that afresh the foundations of thy prison-house are overturned from their root, soar upwards, happy soul, seek James thy sovereign; show him, too, there how to keep pace with his citizens’ loyalty! From the sacred tripod of Law do thou dictate oracular response to the foster sons (nurslings) of Themis. So, O blessed denizens of heaven! may Astrea (the golden age) enjoy the presence of her former champion, or else give to us again Astrea with BACON.17 R. P. * Most strange Latin, something like the poetic interludes in Matranus Capella, a book better known in the Middle Ages than it is now. 1. These enigmatical lines probably mean, “Useless Law-court, Why proudly continue thy work when Bacon lies dead?” though Superbus 2nd sing. Superbis pres. looks tempting with rapinis. [May the lines be applied to the Judgment-Hall of Criticism in Literature, assuming the “purple pride” of illustrious men, and plundering them after death? (See BACONIANA, July, 1896, “Elegy.”) Bacon pronounced the learning of his own day to be “barren” and “fustian.”] 2. This, of course, means, “Name a day for putting on mourning and sackcloth: the justitium: pullati proceres: praetor vadimonia differt. 3. [Themis, Goddess of Order-“Heaven’s first law.”] 4. Expendat should have an object. Can it mean that Bacon’s urn was to be used as a weight? [We submit that here may be a quibbling allusion of the same kind as that of Sir Tobie Matthew, when in a letter to F. Bacon, returning some unnamed work sent for criticism, Sir Tobie says, “I cannot return you weight for weight, but measure for measure.” Urna in its secondary meaning=measure.] 5. [In Promus 816 is the entry Areopagita. Elsewhere we seem to find hints that Bacon was hinted at as the Chief Magistrate or Head of the Tribunal of Literature. May these lines be taken to intimate that no inferior man, no ephor, merely bearing the symbols of power, but the chief himself pressed down the scale? If, as is not unfrequently the case in these occult pieces, grammatical accuracy be disregarded, and if for lanx, lancem, a dish (of the scale) we take lancea, lanceam, a spear, the punster may perhaps see a fuller meaning in these lines.] 6. Who are the breech’d Portico? A collection of Northern Stoics? [Since our learned translator queries this line, we venture to offer an interpretation. Aristotle taught in the Porch, and Bacon was trying to overturn the established method of teaching from Aristotle, whose wisdom, he said, had been degraded by the schoolmen into a teaching of “words, not matter." Braccata=effeminate in its secondary meaning. May not this express the weak, womanish learning which can repeat “words, mere words?”] 7. [The toga, the robe of dignity; the trabea, the vestment of the Augurs. Bacon associates prophecy with poetry. Did he not endeavour equally to purify corruptions in the State and in Literature?] 8. [This seems to hint at the methodised ambiguity which is perceptible in these pieces, and in all Baconian writings.] 9. Very ambiguous in the Latin. Who is subject? Who object? Probably Bacon is subject: “he patched not, but entirely renewed.” [Line 20 seems to speak of Bacon as crawling-just as Hamlet describes himself “crawling between heaven and earth.” This crawling upon earth in Comedy “to tickle the ears of the groundlings,” and the exalting of the high heels of Tragedy to the highest pitch, seem here to be distinguished or contrasted. We are reminded of “Ben Jonson’s” words in praise of “Shakespeare,” who, when he had his buskins on, could not be matched in “arrogant Greek or Haughty Rome,” or by any later poet.] 10. Virbius. See Virgil’s AEneid vii. Also Ovid’s Fasti vi. 756. He was named Hippolytus, because he lived twice. 11. [Here seems to be another of those quibbles which shows the writer to be “a double-meaning prophesier.” Does not the passage express that Bacon rowing boldly through the “Pillars of Hercules non ultra”-the boundaries to knowledge set up by the schoolmen,-like Columbus (a dove), and by the dove-like arts of Apollo (that is, by means of his poetry), added a new visible world of knowledge to the old world of sciences?] 12. Lines 24-30 [being pronounced obscure we again venture to offer some elucidation. A contrast is here presented between the ardour and strength of youth and the feebleness of “crooked age.” Is it an old man fearing dust or darkness for his sole remaining eye, or is it the youthful Hannibal, who ploughs up the sands with his conquering legions? Just as Hannibal took, in his childhood, an oath, to which he adhered all his life, ever to oppose the tyranny of haughty Rome, so Francis Bacon in childhood, had formed “fixed notions” and aims, which lasted to the end of his days, and are apparent in all his writings. One of these fixed notions was to oppose the tyranny of the old schools of teaching, and to surpass all that had been done by “Arrogant Greece and haughty Rome.” There may be still a more occult allusion to Bacon’s method of tradition, or “of handing down the lamp” for the purpose of ensuring, as did Hannibal, a succession of armies, all trained for the same object, and each as invincible as the last. BACON stood alone, as did Hannibal, at the head of an army of literary assistants, mercenaries from many nations, as were Hannibal’s soldiers.] 13. [seems to allude to Milo, who having found an oak-tree split endeavoured to rend it with his hands, but it closed upon his hand, and he was killed by wild beasts. May we not read the lines thus:- “Is Milo unavenged who, stirred to wrath against the oak-tree, it arrested him more painfully than in crooked age did the weight of the ox.” Bacon speaks of Milo, who continued to carry a calf until it grew to be an ox. Perhaps he applied the figure to himself. The work which had grown with his growth had not oppressed him, but when he tried to struggle against the oak (emblem of Age-Time) it was too much for him.] 14. [Compare his own sayings as to the true monuments of men consisting in their writings and not in brass or stone; and see the words of “Ben Jonson” to “Shakespeare,” “Thou art a monument without a tomb.”] 15. The soul learns to do without, grows unaccustomed to, or accustoms herself to be away from, the body. 16. This seems to mean that a “star” (Sirius?) is desired to light the pyre. 17. No doubt a vocative: “Either, O blest spirits, let Astrea enjoy her Bacon in heaven, or send both down to us on earth.” 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  4. TRANSLATION OF WILLARD PARKER IV ON THE DEATH OF THE MOST HONORED MAN AND LORD, SIR FRANCIS OF VERULAM, VISCOUNT ST. ALBAN, LATE CHANCELLOR OF ENGLAND Art thou, oh, barren tribunal, (A) still proud of thine insolent purple, When thou beholdest the bier that is robbing the famed of their greatness? Nay! be this day to the deepest humility now given over, Turning to sack-cloth the pomp which thou at thy bar ever wearest. Themis1 shall carry, not scales, but the urn bearing Verulam’s ashes; Then let her weigh, but not Ephorus,2 tipping the beam of her steelyard, But Areopagus,2 adding its ponderous weight to the balance. Greater the sage that we mourn than philosophy old and scholastic, In its barbarian porch;3 loud groaned the axis revolving When this pile fell, this structure of wonderful greatness; dissolved was the Vault of the whole world of letters, wherein, with a brilliancy equal, Graced he the citizen’s garb, as likewise the toga of statecraft. As, in the shades of Dis4 wandering, still longed Eurydice4 sadly, Kisses on Orpheus4 to lavish - Styx4 waves first calm and then bounding, As to his magical fingers rang out the lyre-strings-so Learning Thrilled to his touch, when entangled deep in the webs of the Schoolman, Raised high her crest 'neath his fingers; newly enlivened her sock-tread,5 Oh, when his stage-shaking buskin5 rose up so tragic, like Virbius,6 Sprang into being the Stagerite7 new-lived in Novum Organum. Proud leaves Columbus the Pillars8 Calpe and Abyla behind him, Destined to give to his fellows new worlds and arts as a heritage; Ardor of youth pushes forward, in spite of Fate’s threatening and menace. Who is the Ancient or Hannibal,9 fearing his sole eye’s eclipsing, Winnowing the Street of Suburra10 with his victorious standards? Who is the Milo11 so powerful, courting the rage of the oak tree, When his old shoulders are borne down heavier with age than the Ox-weight?12 Vainly our hero bestowed upon Science eternal duration, Yet, alas! found he in truth ’twas his sepulchre he had constructed. Ecstasy tranquil, the thinking whereby his great mind philosophic, Soaring past stars to Olympus,13 seeks, of all Good, contemplation; There it abideth at rest-, is now to its earth-home a stranger; Now it comes back;- then again it is coyly and playfully roaming; Once more returns, till at last,-in earnest,-in secret withdrawing,- Parteth the soul from the ailing body, and thus to Death leaves it. Come then ye Muses of Mourning, gather incense from Libanus;14 Be it a crime that the royal pyre with the flames of Prometheus,15 Filched from the hearth of the kitchen, should for his funeral be kindled. And, if, by breezes more wanton, his sacred ashes be scattered, Weep till each following teardrop joins in embrace with its fellows.16 Burst be thy prison foundations, seek thou the royal Jacobus17 Showing that loyalty follows, even the true soul’s hereafter. Then, from Law’s tripod announcing, shalt thou thine oracles utter To the disciples of Themis.18 Thus ye blest dwellers in Heaven, Be unto Astraea19 renewed now the joy of her champion ancient; Or else with Bacon return ye Astraea19 even as aforetime. R. P. (A) House of Lords. 1. Goddess of Law and Order. 2. Literally, not one man but a mountain of rock. Figuratively, not one judge but the entire Court. 3. Probably refers to the old Stoic Scholasticism. 4. From the legend of the adventure of Orpheus and Eurydice in the lower world. 5. Compare Ben Jonson’s preface to Folio of 1623. 6. Hippolytus raised from the dead lived as Virbius. 7. Aristotle, born in Stagira. 8. Pillars of Hercules. 9. Hannibal had lost an eye. 10. Street and section of Rome occupied by booksellers where great excitement was caused by the approach of Hannibal’s army. Does this refer to the excitement among piratical booksellers of London when the forthcoming Great Folio was announced? 11. Great strong-man who was eaten by wolves when his hands were caught in the cleft of an oak. Suggests Prospero’s threat to Ariel. 12. Milo carried a heifer on his back. 13. Mount where dwelt the gods. 14. Lebanon, noted for its cedars. 15. Who stole fire from Heaven. 16. Tears chase each other down the cheeks. 17. James I, who died in 1625. 18. Goddess of Law and Order. 19. Goddess of Justice. 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  5. TRANSLATION OF FATHER WILLIAM A. SUTTON 4. ON THE DEATH OF THE RIGHT HONOURABLE LORD FRANCIS OF VERULAM, VISCOUNT ST. ALBANS, LATE CHANCELLOR OF ENGLAND. Do you yet arrayed in proud purple exult over so many renowned men with the spoils of the bier, O barren tribunal?3 Proclaim a day for hair-cloth, turn all the luxury of the Forum into sack-cloth, let not the pendent balance be borne by Themis,4 but the urn, the ponderous urn of Verulam. Let her weigh. Alas! it is not an Ephorus presses down the scale, but the Areopagus;5 nor is so great a sage less than the foreign Porch.6 For your axis groans, ye schools, as the mighty mass crashes down. The pole of the literary globe is dislocated, where with equal earnestness he adorned the garb of a citizen and the robe of state. As Eurydice wandering through the shades of Dis longed to caress Orpheus, so did Philosophy entangled in the subtleties of Schoolmen seek Bacon as a deliverer, with such winged hand as Orpheus lightly touched the lyre’s strings, the Styx before scarce ruffled now at last bounding, with like hand stroked Philosophy raised high her crest; nor did he with workmanship of fussy meddlers patch, but he renovated her walking lowly in the shoes of Comedy. After that more elaborately he rises on the loftier tragic buskin, and the Stagirite (like) Virbius comes to life again in the Novum Organum.7 The Columbus of Apollo with his lordly crew passes beyond the Pillars of Hercules in order to bestow a new world and new arts; youthful ardour advances his efforts even to the harsh envy of menacing fate. What ancient or what Hannibal fearing blindness of his remaining eye agitates (winnows) the Subura with his victorious standards (companies)?8 What mighty Milo enrages the oaks, when gibbous old age weighs more heavily than the ox?9 While our demi-god transmitted sciences to all ages to come, he is found to be the altogether too premature constructor of his own tomb. His philosophic thinking seems tranquil ecstasy, whereby his mind wings its way through the galaxy of the heavens to contemplate the ideas of the good. There it abides as in its home, a stranger in its own. It returns. Playfully coy again it roams, and again returns.10 At last in earnest secretly it wholly withdraws; thus the spirit gets disused to the groaning, sickly, dead body, thus bids it die. Come, mourning Muses, gather frankincense from the heights of Libanus. Let every star emit a spark into his pyre; be it sacrilege that the kingly pile should be kindled for Prometheus from a kitchen fire. And if perchance some mischievous breeze should frolic amid the sacred ashes and try to scatter them, then weep; the sequent teardrops will rush to mutual embraces. Once more, go forth, happy soul, the foundation of your prison being utterly destroyed, seek James, prove that even thither a subject’s loyalty follows. From the tripod of law go on uttering oracles for the disciples of Themis. Thus, blessed inhabitants of heaven, let Astraea enjoy her champion of old, or with Bacon give back Astraea. R. P. NOTES. 3. The House of Lords. 4. Goddess of law, custom and equity, represented carrying scales. 5. This is, not a single judge, but the whole Supreme Court. The Areopagus of Athens was sometimes called, “The Upper House.” Cicero writes to Atticus: “the Senate is an Areopagus” (ad. Att., I. 14). 6. Literally, trousered Porch. All the nations around the Greeks and Romans were represented braccatae. Seneca was a Spaniard. Stoic philosopher, statesman, writer of tragedies and brilliant man of letters, he was condemned to death by Nero, who put to death other stoics too. In fact, under the Claudian and Flavian emperors and Senate, the stoics had a bad time. Hence it seems that the allusion in the text is to these, and especially to Seneca. 7. Aristotle, like Bacon, had “taken all knowledge for his province.” He called his logic the organon[1]this is, the instrument of reason for demonstration. Hippolytus restored to life by AEsculapius was worshipped in Italy under the name of Virbius. In this passage the grammatical concordance is not clear - e.g., whether reptitantem refers to philosophy or to Bacon, and consequently what the subject of the verbs following is. However, apart even from other considerations which would enable us to settle the matter, the parallelism of the complex simile requires the interpretation given. In any case the ultimate meaning is the same, viz., that philosophy was renovated by Bacon in the guise of the drama. All the Shakespeare plays are saturated with Bacon’s science, learning and wisdom. 8. I will make some suggestions to interpret this enigma. In the first place, it is enough for a comparison that some striking feature should be some way common to both members. Omnis comparatio claudicat -every comparison halts. Every schoolboy knows that Hannibal lost an eye soon after invading Italy. When he marched his army-always victorious in the field-to the very walls of Rome, great panic there was the result, especially in the Subura, the most crowded quarter. Near the Subura ran the Argiletum, a street mostly occupied by the booksellers. Ventilare means to fan, to agitate, to winnow, in a special manner the last. Bacon’s eye referred to here means (I suggest) “the poet’s eye in a fine frenzy rolling,” and, by a common figure of speech, the products of that eye; so that “his surviving (superstitis) eye” would mean such of his plays as survived, for he had been writing plays since his youth, and had allowed multitudes of them to perish. We are told not one in fifty of the Elizabethan plays have probably come down to us. Even his surviving plays were winnowed-that is, the thirty-six plays of the folio were selected by him to represent his wisdom and philosophy, and when the news got abroad that Shakespeare’s plays were to be published, and when Ben Jonson and others (“good pens which desert me not”) busied themselves in collecting copies and in entering them where necessary at Stationers’ Hall, thereby securing and notifying copyright or its equivalent (see Webb’s “Mystery of William Shakespeare,” p. 261), the Subura of London, inhabited by actors, playwrights, booksellers (pirates several of them), &c., was much agitated. 9. The elegist in this couplet implies that Bacon had tried to do away with certain rooted abuses; but one of them (judges taking gifts, not necessarily bribes, from suitors) had caught him by the hands in his old age and left him a prey to his enemies. Milo, of Crotona, the most famous athlete of antiquity, carried an ox on his shoulders and ate it afterwards in one day. In his old age, trying to rive a partly split oak, it closed on his hands, and so he perished by wild beasts. Multus looks like a misprint for inultus, unavenged or unvindicated. 10. Bacon used to keep himself very retired at times. His friends complained that they could not gain access to him. His own expression was that he was keeping state. Spedding tells us that, amazingly frank as he is in the letters and documents he has left regarding his life generally, yet he never admits us to his fireside. His private life remains a mystery. 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  6. THE FOUR TRANSLATIONS OF THE MEMORIAE VERSES 1626 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  7. THE FOUR TRANSLATION OF THE MEMORIAE VERSES 1626 TRANSLATION OF E. K. RAND III On the Death of the Incomparable Francis, Viscount St. Alban, Baron Verulam. 1 The while thou didst groan beneath the burden of a long and lingering malady, and pining life halted with uncertain foot, what did wise fate intend?2 I now at last can see. Only in April, surely, couldst thou die, that here the flower with its tears, there Philomel3 with her laments, may follow only thy tongue’s funeral-train.4 GEORGE HERBERT. _____________________________________________________________________ 1. This poem is translated into German by G. Cantor. Op. cit., p. xv. 2. Punctuate: pede…fatum? Jam… 3. the nightingale. 4. i. e. may devote all their laments to you 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  8. THE FOUR TRANSLATIONS OF THE MEMORIAE VERSES 1626 TRANSLATION OF THE BACON SOCIETY [ELEGY 3] On the Death of the Incomparable Francis Visct. St. Alban, Baron of Verulam. “How long hast thou been forced to sigh beneath The burden of a wasting, slow disease, Whilst life with faltering steps still clung to thee! Now I perceive in this the Fates’ design; For surely April only, is the month In which thou couldest die; that thus with tears Of flowers and with nightingale’s laments Thine obsequies may be accompanied By rites, accordant with thine eloquence.” - George Herbert. Note that Shakespere, as well as Bacon, is said to have died in the month of April-a month recognised as the emblem of Spring, Resurrection, Revival, the Renaissance. The allusion is made plainer by the introduction of the nightingale (Philo mela, the lover of song). George Herbert seems to us to have adopted this emblematic allusion to the Poet’s peculiar genius from Bacon himself, and from the symbolism which he taught to his disciples. We would also ask attention to the description given here, and in the lines of Thomas Rhodes, of Bacon dying under a lingering disease or through many illnesses. It will be seen that another poet repeats this particular; but what are we to conclude from these records when we meet with one, such as the following, wherein the writer, G. Nash, challenges men to say that Francis Bacon has not been permitted to number eighty Decembers, at the same time likening him in age to Nestor? Nestor-whose very name is almost a proverb, to express the greatest wisdom in the most aged frame-“Venerable Nestor,” “most reverend Nestor,” “Old Nestor,” “one that was a man when Hector's grandsire suck'd,” these are Shakespeare’s words, they never yet were held unfitting words, but are they words fit to be applied to Bacon, if he truly died, as we are usually informed, at the too early age of sixty-five? 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  9. THE FOUR TRANSLATION OF THE MEMORIAE VERSES 1626 TRANSLATION OF WILLARD PARKER III ON THE DEATH OF THE INCOMPARABLE FRANCIS BACON, VISCOUNT ST. ALBAN, BARON VERULAM. While thou didst groan 'neath the burden of malady painful and lingering; While thy life halted uncertain, tell me, what WAS Fate’s intention? Now I can see, for in April alone could’st thou die, when the flowers, Tears and the sad Philomela1 -nightingale with her lamenting. Follow the funeral cortege to thy eloquence, now for aye silent. GEORGE HERBERT 1. The nightingale 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  10. THE FOUR TRANSLATION OF THE MEMORIAE VERSES 1626 TRANSLATION OF FATHER WILLIAM A SUTTON 3. ON THE DEATH OF THE PEERLESS FRANCIS, VISCOUNT ST. ALBANS, BARON VERULAM. While you groan under the weight of a long and slow disease, and languishing life holds on with lingering step, what foreseeing fate had in view, I now at length perceive. It is evident that in April alone you could have died: in order that on the one hand the tearful flower and on the other the nightingale might celebrate the only obsequies of your tongue. GEORGE HERBERT. 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  11. THE FOUR TRANSLATION OF THE MEMORIAE VERSES 1626 ELEGY 3 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  12. THE FOUR TRANSLATION OF THE MEMORIAE VERSES 1626 TRANSLATION OF E.K.RAND II The Literary Works of Bacon are called to the Pyre. Instauratio Magna; 1 subtle sayings;2 a twofold increase of the sciences, written both in thy country’s speech and then in Latin with multifold enlargement;3 profound history of life and death,4 anointed as it were, or rather bathed, with stream of nectar or with Attic honey! Nor must the seventh Henry5 fail of mention, or if aught there be of more cultured loves,6 aught that I unwitting have passed over of the works which the vigor of great Bacon hath produced7 -a Muse more choice than the nine Muses. Ascend ye [Muses] all, the funeral flames and give to your parent8 liquid light. The ages are not worthy to enjoy you, when alas, (oh monstrous shame!) your Lord is taken away. S. COLLINS, R. C. P. (RECTOR OF KING’S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.) _____________________________________________________________________ 1. Alluding to Bacon’s work of this name. 2. The Apothegms (?). 3. The Advancement of Learning, in its twofold edition (English and Latin). 4. The Historia Vitae et Mortis. 5. The History of Henry VII. 6. i. e. stories of love more spiritually interpreted, as in de principiis atque originibus secundum Fabulas Cupidinis et Caeli (?). Cf. also the general method of de Sapientia veterum. 7. Punctuate: Baconi,-Musis. 8. i. e. Bacon. The above lines suggest the conception of the Muses and of Philosophy in Boethius, Consolatio Philosophiae. 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  13. THE FOUR TRANSLATION OF THE MEMORIAE VERSES 1626 TRANSLATION OF THE BACON SOCIETY [ELEGY 2] The works of Bacon are called to the tomb. Great indeed is the “Great Instauration”-its axioms keen and wise-the product of twin sciences, and of writings handed down from generation to generation. Thence much has been expanded in the Latin tongue; profound study of the History of Life and Death, anointed or sprinkled in the Stream of Nectar, the honey of Athens. Nor must I be silent concerning the “History of Henry VIIth,” or indeed of any other matter touching the Fine Arts, or perchance other works still of which I am ignorant, but which the active mind of the mighty Bacon has brought forth. Now that a tenth muse is added to you, nine, submit yourselves one and all to the funeral flames. Furnish (by your own burning) a bright light to the Father of you all. These are not ages worthy to enjoy you. Ah, what a master have we lost! Ah, what disgrace we suffer! S. COLLINS, R. C. P. Note the hint which we have placed in italics, of “other works” unacknowledged. Note also this repeated allusion to Francis Bacon as “the Tenth Muse.” 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  14. THE FOUR TRANSLATION OF THE MEMORIAE VERSES 1626 TRANSLATION OF WILLARD PARKER II THE LITERARY WORKS OF BACON ARE CALLED TO THE PYRE. Instauratio Magna;1 saying of marvelous subtlety; Twofold increase of all science; writ in the tongue of thy homeland, Greatly enlarged in the Latin; Life and Death history profoundest Bathed in the sweet Attic honey! Tale of the great Seventh Henry Pass I not silently over; stories of love more refined2 which Still do interpret in spirit Great Bacon’s Muse with a vigor Choicer by far than the Muses3 -The nine that are fabled in story,- Rise in the flames of his funeral, Muses, your sire’s pathway lighting. Ages of you are unworthy,-Your Master (Oh! Shame) is departed! S. COLLINS, R. C. P., Rector of King’s College, Cambridge. 1. The Great Restoration. 2. Obviously refers to unacknowledged works-love stories! 3. Goddesses of Poetry, Arts and Sciences, Clio of History, Melpomene of Tragedy, Polymnia of Hymns, Enterpe of Music, Terpsichore of Dance, Urania of Astronomy, Thalia of Comedy, Erato of Love Poetry, Calliope, the chief, of poetic inspiration. 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  15. THE FOUR TRANSLATION OF THE MEMORIAE VERSES 1626 TRANSLATION OF FATHER WILLIAM A. SUTTON 2. THE LITERARY WORKS OF BACON ARE SUMMONED TO THE PYRE. The Great Instauration; stimulating aphorisms;2 the twofold Advancement of the Sciences, written both in English and then in Latin with manifold increase; the profound History of Life and Death, how suffused with (or is it bathed in?) a stream of nectar or Attic honey! Neither let Henry the Seventh be passed over in silence; and whatever there is of more refined beauties, and any smaller works I may have omitted in my ignorance, which the power of great Bacon brought forth, a muse more rare than the nine muses, all enter ye the funeral fires, and give bright light to your Sire. The ages are not worthy to enjoy you, now alas! that your Lord, oh shocking! has perished. S. COLLINS, R. C. P. 2. The Novum Organum appeared in 1620 under the title of Instauratio Magna. It is written in aphorisms. Dicta acute therefore describes briefly the first work on the list; others which follow are similarly treated. 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  16. THE FOUR TRANSLATIONS OF THE MEMORIAE VERSES 1626 ELEGY 2 BY SAMUEL COLLINS 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  17. Hi Yann, Whenever we put up original texts on B'Hive (in this case the 1626 Memoriae) I immediately think of you-because I know you can illuminate them and reveal up some of their secrets. We are going to put up all thirty-two verses and their translations and very much look forward to your future observations and insights. Peace and Love Phoenix.
  18. THE FOUR TRANSLATION OF THE MEMORIAE VERSES 1626 ELEGY 1 TRANSLATION OF E.K.RAND I Lament for the Death of the all-learned and eminent Man, Sir1 Francis Bacon of St. Alban. Mourn, ye Alban Lares, and thou good Martyr,2 the hallowed demise3 of the old man of Verulam. Aye, good Martyr, raise thou too the old lament, to whom nothing has been sadder, next to thy dire cloak.4 ____________________________________________­­­­­­_________________________ 1. I take Dominus here and in most of the headings to denote the title ‘Sir’ given to a B. A. of Cambridge. (See Cent. Dict. s. v. dominus and sir.) This whole collection of poems is a kind of bouquet from Cambridge, especially Trinity College, from which Bacon was graduated. ‘Lord’ however, is a possible translation, as Bacon was Lord Chancellor. Or, again, the Sir may refer to his knighthood. 2. St. Alban, protomartyr of England. 3. fata non temeranda, lit. ‘the fate which none may desecrate.’ Fatum has its ordinary meaning, yet appears also to connote sepulcrum, the tomb, its outer sign. The phrase is practically equivalent to cineres sacros in Poem 4, near end. 4. Alban exchanged his cloak with that of a fugitive Christian, who thus escaped his pursuers, whereas Alban was martyred by them. The story is told by Gildas and Bede. See Baring Gould, Lives of the Saints, June 22 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  19. THE FOUR TRANSLATION OF THE MEMORIAE VERSES 1626 ELEGY 1 TRANSLATION OF THE BACON SOCIETY [ELEGY 1] Lamentation on the death of Lord Fras. Bacon, Vis. St. Alban, most learned in all things, most illustrious of men. “O, house of St. Alban (and thou its martyr) weep for the death of the ever-revered aged Man of Verulam, greatest of martyrs. Mourn thou to whom no more grievous misfortune has happened since that terrible ensnaring in the net.” The words placed in italics are a not quite satisfactory rendering of the Greek-Latin word Amphibalum (or Amphiballon), a netting round or encirclement (See Matt. IV., 18).The allusion is obscure, but it seems to mean that nothing so sad as Bacon’s death had occurred since he had been benetted, or drawn into the toils of enemies, who laid traps to entangle him and to ensure his ruin for their own ends. The writer wisely wraps up in occult language, a sentiment which might have proved perilous to himself. He also omits to add a signature. 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  20. THE FOUR TRANSLATIONS OF THE MEMORIAE VERSES 1626 ELEGY 1 TRANSLATION OF WILLARD PARKER I DEATH LAMENTATIONS FOR THE ALL-LEARNED AND RENOWNED MAN, LORD FRANCIS BACON OF ST. ALBAN. Mourn, Oh! ye Lares1 of Alban, likewise thou prototype Martyr.2 Passing of Verulam’s sage;-be his hallowed fate ne’er desecrated! Aye! thou good Martyr, lament, for no sad fate hath ever been sadder, Saving thine own, when thou fellest beneath the dire cloak of another. No Signature. 1. Household Deities. 2. St. Alban exchanged cloaks with a hunted Christian priest named Amphibalus, and was martyred in his stead. 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  21. THE FOUR TRANSLATIONS OF THE MEMORIAE VERSES 1626 ELEGY 1 TRANSLATION OF FATHER WILLIAM A. SUTTON I. LAMENT FOR THE DEATH OF THE ALL-LEARNED AND RENOWNED MAN LORD FRANCIS BACON OF ST. ALBANS. Bewail ye guardian spirits of St. Albans, and thou most holy martyr, the death not to be profaned of the ancient of Verulam. Holy Martyr, do thou also betake thyself even to the old wailings, thou to whom nothing is sadder since the fateful (change of) raiment.1 1. St. Alban (A.D. 303) was martyred through having changed clothes with a priest-his friend-whose name was Amphibalus. Amphibalus also means a cloak, vestis exterior. There is therefore a play upon the word here. 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  22. A New Book from A Phoenix The Secret Links Between the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Memoriae (1626) Containing Thirty-Two Verses Dedicated To Francis Bacon Our Shakespeare, The First Folio of the Shakespeare Works (1623), and the Stratford Monument 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  23. A New Book from A Phoenix The Secret Links Between the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Memoriae (1626) Containing Thirty-Two Verses Dedicated To Francis Bacon Our Shakespeare, The First Folio of the Shakespeare Works (1623), and the Stratford Monument 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  24. A New Book from A Phoenix The Secret Links Between the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Memoriae (1626) Containing Thirty-Two Verses Dedicated To Francis Bacon Our Shakespeare, The First Folio of the Shakespeare Works (1623), and the Stratford Monument 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
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