Jump to content

A Phoenix

Members
  • Posts

    3,895
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    438

Posts posted by A Phoenix

  1. Hi Rob,

    When the truth fully emerges it will be revealed that not only did Marlowe not write any part of the Shakespeare works but he also did not write the works attributed to him, many of which were published anonymously after his death in 1593. The simple reason why there are hundreds of parallels between the 'Shakespeare' and 'Marlowe' works is because they share a common author, Francis Bacon. 

    • Thanks 1
    • Wow! 1
    • Haha 1
  2. His fall from grace was one of the greatest political betrayals in English history, in order that King James could save the favourite George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, and so that he could save himself.

    The subject has been extensively treated by:

    William Hepworth Dixon [of the Inner Temple], Personal History of Lord Bacon From Unpublished Papers (Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1856), pp. 314-424.

    His great editor and biographer James Spedding: see The Letters and Life of Francis Bacon, VII, pp. passim.

    His great Baconian biographer Alfred Dodd, The Martyrdom of Francis Bacon (London: Rider and Co., n.d.), passim and Alfred Dodd, Francis Bacon's Personal Life Story (London: Rider and Co., 1986), pp. 518-32.

    H. Kendra Baker (Barrister-at-Law), The Persecution of Francis Bacon (Published by The Francis Bacon Society, 1978), passim

    All the major modern historians, biographers and lawyers that I am familiar with accept that Lord Bacon's fall was as a result of a political conspiracy and betrayal that was engineered by his life-time enemy Sir Edward Coke, a situation used by James I and Buckingham to deflect attention away from their venal corruption and misuse of monopolies granted by the king to Buckingham which made him and his family extremely wealthy. 

    Under pressure from James I (possibly on pain of death) Lord Bacon nobly sacrificed himself on behalf of the king and country on the understanding that he would be restored back to royal favour and able to continue his public service in his role as the greatest statesman of the age. This was also denied him by James I and his son Charles I both of whom were under the nefarious influence of the poisoner and murderer George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, the most reviled and hated figure of the Stuart age, who died not too long after at the hand of an assassin.   

     

    • Like 2
    • Thanks 1
  3. Posting the final Ancestral Trees in this section as well so readers can see the early beginnings of this fantastic project

    Francis Bacon's Ancestral Trees by Eric Roberts & Julie Kemp

    Earlier, this year art historian and top B’Hive contributor Eric Roberts & genealogist Julie Kemp began some important research into Francis Bacon's ancestral trees. They researched both the acknowledged and hidden genealogy and between them have collated, compiled and created three quite extraordinary Francis Bacon ancestral trees.

    Francis Bacon's Orthodox Ancestry - The Day Tree
    Francis Bacon's Concealed Ancestry - The Night Tree
    Francis Bacon's Extended Family - The Gorhambury Tree

    The project started to take shape here on the B’Hive with comments and suggestions from B’Hive members – a great example of the power of industry and co-operation.

    Huge thanks and congratulations to Eric and Julie for creating both beautiful and illuminating contributions to Baconian scholarship.

    The Francis Bacon Society is proud to present them with fascinating explanatory notes from the creators Eric and Julie. Read here: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/francis-bacon/images-genealogy/francis-bacons-ancestral-trees/

    These three beautiful and unique trees are now available exclusively from the Francis Bacon Society Gift store as A3 posters and also as digital downloads and make an extraordinary gift for any Baconian. See here: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/the-society/gift-store/

    DAY POSTER WITH WATERMARK (1).png

    NIGHT POSTER WITH WATERMARK (1).png

    GORHAMBURY POSTER WITH WATERMARK (2) (1).png

    • Like 3
  4. Francis Bacon's Ancestral Trees by Eric Roberts & Julie Kemp

    Earlier, this year art historian and top B’Hive contributor Eric Roberts & genealogist Julie Kemp began some important research into Francis Bacon's ancestral trees. They researched both the acknowledged and hidden genealogy and between them have collated, compiled and created three quite extraordinary Francis Bacon ancestral trees.

    Francis Bacon's Orthodox Ancestry - The Day Tree
    Francis Bacon's Concealed Ancestry - The Night Tree
    Francis Bacon's Extended Family - The Gorhambury Tree

    The project started to take shape here on the B’Hive with comments and suggestions from B’Hive members – a great example of the power of industry and co-operation.

    Huge thanks and congratulations to Eric and Julie for creating both beautiful and illuminating contributions to Baconian scholarship.

    The Francis Bacon Society is proud to present them with fascinating explanatory notes from the creators Eric and Julie. Read here: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/francis-bacon/images-genealogy/francis-bacons-ancestral-trees/

    These three beautiful and unique trees are now available exclusively from the Francis Bacon Society Gift store as A3 posters and also as digital downloads and make an extraordinary gift for any Baconian. See here: https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/the-society/gift-store/

     

    DAY POSTER WITH WATERMARK (1).png

    NIGHT POSTER WITH WATERMARK (1).png

    GORHAMBURY POSTER WITH WATERMARK (2).png

    • Wow! 2
  5. Hi Yann,

    I have long since exhausted my limited vocabulary and superlatives in attempting to describe your groundbreaking identifications and world first revelations.

    You deserve all the praise that comes your way and more, much much.

    Peace and Love.

    Phoenix. 

    • Like 2
    • Thanks 1
  6. Hi Yann,

    WOW! WOW! WOW!

    Even by your own incomparable unique standards these cryptographic textual identifications are truly surpassing and in the fullness of time, with your other many world firsts, will secure for you an honoured place in the hallowed pantheon of Baconian scholarship.   

    Peace and Love.

    Phoenix. 

    • Like 1
    • Thanks 1
  7. 1 hour ago, Eric Roberts said:

    ANTHONYBACONORROBERTDEVEREUX.jpeg.b5cde75cba50857546ce4a669559415d.jpeg

    Gorhambury Collection.  Hilliard... supposedly of Robert Devereux, but looks nothing like Essex's other portraits.

    Daphne du Maurier's "The Golden Lads" has this picture on its cover as a portrait of Anthony. 

    I think it's Anthony which would make sense as it's in the Gorhambury collection, the clothes are beautiful. I can't help thinking the hands look extremely strange though - almost unfinished. There's another copy of this painting I think where his beard is dark not red. Are there multiple copies of this one too?

    • Like 3
  8. Hi Eric,

    Great sleuthing and yet another mystery!! Nothing is ever straightforward with FB. I didn't realise there were this many versions and the earlier one by the Venetian artist is indeed a connundrum. I presume there is not much information from Gorhambury, no clue to the artist at all? If it has always been in their collection then surely the Venetian one that pre-dates it must be incorrectly attributed. Maybe if it was a commission from Elizabeth herself, an earlier attribution would be 'convenient' so as to 'not tread to near the heels of truth'. I wonder how the Royal Collection archivist explains the anomaly. Just looking at the ear on the baby, the boy and the Hilliard teenager and to me they all look unmistakenably from the same person, rather large and a large ear lobe.

    Very interesting and mysterious as usual!

    • Like 2
    • Thanks 1
  9. 'Uncovered: 428-year-old secret dossier reveals Elizabeth I’s network of spies
    A list compiled by spymaster Robert Cecil gives an insight into the beginnings of the secret service, says historian'

    Kate just sent this interesting article over about a secret dossier that has just come to light about the Elizabethan spy network and the Secret Service. Makes you wonder what other dossiers are just waiting to be found!

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/article/2024/jun/29/uncovered-428-year-old-secret-dossier-reveals-elizabeth-is-network-of-spies

    • Wow! 2
  10. Quote

    Hi Eric,

    My opinion for what it's worth, is that it looks like a young boy, around 6-8 years.

    The terracotta busts like you say are magnificent. I expect it does beg the question though why are there not 4 busts? If the two boys were both born Bacons why were both not commemorated? To commemorate just Anthony and leave out Francis would seem an unlikely act from a kind and judicious Sir Nicholas and might even invite suspicion about Francis' parentage. Whereas your suggestion that the bust was potentially a 'demonstration of loyalty and commitment' to the Queen is more than feasible.

    Who knows for certain? All very intriguing.

    4 hours ago, Eric Roberts said:

     

    What age is this young boy?

    All guesses welcome...

     

    FBGORHAMBURYBUSTFULLFACE.jpeg.119acf5c5b98ad43ef538557d226da13.jpeg

    FBGORHAMBURYBUSTPROFILE.jpeg.bb191e5d005b367b82851a2fe4d52463.jpeg

     

    Image credit: Folger Library

     

    A number of historians, including Peter Dawkins, claim this can't be a bust of Francis since the boy is twelve years old, or thereabouts. To me he looks more like 7-8. I'd be interested to know what you think.

     

     

    • Like 2
  11. Hi Yann,

    Brilliant work. 

    We do not have a copy of the 1656 work but we have just looked it up on google which seems to indicate that it is also 103 pages (see link below).

    In our work on the Shakespeare First Folio we reproduced the AA headpiece over the 1648 and 1656 editions, and from the latter, a portrait of the Great One (pp. 233-38). The Freemason and voluminous Baconian scholar Alfred Dodd reveals the esoteric significance of the Bacon portrait (see below).

    I also think the 33 years from the 1615 Confesio to the 1648 Remaines is a very interesting conjecture and given the RC Brothers love of numbers and dates I would not be surprised if the year for its publication was chosen deliberately.

    First edition of the Resusciatio in 1657: when we drop the null '6' it leaves 157 Fra Rosicrosse in simple cipher!

    The first volume of Spedding's standard 14 volume edition of The Life and Works of Francis Bacon in 1857:  when we drop the null '8' it leaves 157 Fra Rosicrosse in simple cipher!

    The Shakespearean Ciphers Examined by the Friedmans first published in 1957: if we drop the null '9' it leaves 157 Fra Rosicrosse in simple cipher!

    All of the above works are replete with Baconian-Rosicrucian ciphers!

    https://books.google.co.uk/books/about/The_Mirrour_of_State_and_Eloquence.html?id=MUrDzwEACAAJ&redir_esc=y

    https://www.academia.edu/103102421/The_1623_Shakespeare_First_Folio_A_Baconian_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Illusion

    Screenshot (2246).png

    • Thanks 1
    • Wow! 1
  12. Hi Eric,

    Thanks for bringing one of the most prolific Baconian writers to our attention, Alicia A. Leith. The above work is not dated but published by Gorhambury Press, London.

    Leith was an early Society member and was a massive contributor as seen here:

    https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/1_Baconiana-Index-1886-1999.pdf  p. 44 Alicia A. Leith

    A letter (below) from her appeared in a 1941 Baconiana and speaks of an annotated First Folio at Padua with a plea that the Society should not forget its existence https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/1941_Baconiana_No-98.pdf  p. 157. Sadly up above on page 153 there is an obituary for her sister another prominent Baconian.

    Alicia A Leith died in 1945 (picture and obituary below) https://francisbaconsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/1945_Baconiana_No-115.pdf

    Screenshot (2240).png

    Screenshot (2241).png

    Screenshot (2242).png

    • Like 3
    • Thanks 1
  13. MORE ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON THE 1616 PLEMPII EMBLEM CONFIRMING BACON IS SHAKESPEARE

    In 1616, the year in which Bacon’s literary mask William Shakspere died, there was published at Amsterdam a very rare Rosicrucian work with the following title page ‘Cornelii Giselberti Plempii Amsterodamun Monogrammon’. The enigmatic work contains fifty illustrations with Latin verses beneath them. Emblem 1 sees Fortune standing upon a globe (an allusion to the Globe Theatre) with one hand pushing from the pinnacle of Fame a man dressed as an actor with a feather in his hat; and the other, raising up a man wearing the familiar Bacon hat (in nearly all portraits he is presented wearing the hat of the Grand Master of the Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood), whose face is hidden. Confirmation it is Bacon comes in the form of the initial letters from the ninth line in the verse ‘Obscaenumque nimis crepuit, Fortuna Batavis Appellanda’, an anagram which yields F BACON. The anagrammatic device does not stand alone. There are 22 letters above the emblem and 78 words (not counting the ampersand) in the Latin verse: 22+78=100 Francis Bacon in simple cipher. The total of 100 plus 1 ampersand and the 2 characters in the signature: 100+1+2=103 Shakespeare in simple cipher.  The numerical value of the first letter of every indented line in the verse added together (P, I, R, E, A, V): 15+9+17+5+1+20=67 Francis in simple cipher. The numerical value of every line in the verse (E, P, F, I, O, R, O, E, O, A, Q, V): 5+15+6+9+14+17+14+5+14+1+16+20=136 a double cipher for 33/103 Bacon/Shakespeare in simple cipher. The meaning of the emblem is now rendered clear. As the ages roll on, by slow degree Fortune will cast down the myth of the Stratford actor William Shakspere and raise up and reveal the concealed disguised truth that Francis Bacon is the true author of the Shakespeare works.

     

     

    Screenshot (2239).png

    • Like 1
    • Wow! 1
×
×
  • Create New...