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Kate

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Everything posted by Kate

  1. Just posted on social media about the printer’s device on New Atlantis. Thanks to the book Eric posted that I believe AP first mentioned (I’ve lost track) I now see that the 1554 device has differences in the way the motto is laid out on the New Atlantis cover. Also the scythe is pointing to the other direction. Both are by Richard Smith as there’s a small RS on the early one too but I wonder if we should look more closely due to this left right switch and rearrangement of the motto. Is it just artistic licence or something else? Has anyone looked into this? Top one is 1554 according to the book. Why split the word Tempore?
  2. This is not the best example because the name William is all straight lines in capitals. You have to imagine doing it in a more looped way and with names that have curvy letters So at the bottom centre it says WILLIAM. It says so in the footnotes blurb. I’ll see if it can find the examples that I’d seen on Pinterest.
  3. Poetry in motion. It's interesting that if you think of how the printers' devices include names like William, which are a series of lines making letters that spell out the name (but all on top of each other), that this is like a 7, then a square and then a 2. 7 + 2 = 9, a hugely important number. Well done Rob. You'll have to show me how you did that. I am mesmerised. Can you try it on the others? Edit Actually, I am going to add to this. If it is like the way they drew names then 7, plus a square, plus 2 is important as it would be 7 + 4 + 2 = 13. Wow. ok. As with 13 and people thinking it is unlucky and an 'occult' number, I always smile when I see people harking on about De Vere and 4T. Understanding the way they looked at numbers like 13 and 40 in that era is so important. Nothing to do with De Vere.
  4. Just came across this guy’s feed. It’s amazing. See the one on Bibles and also a separate one showing King James’ book on Demonology (daemonology) Turns out he’s related to Shakespeare! 13 times removed. https://www.instagram.com/reel/C1si9DUujPY/?igsh=ZzBqam0zc3RhZzM5
  5. Here is page 33. It is actually billed as Ornamental Details of the Italian Renaissance. I haven't fully looked through it yet but it looked interesting at first glance. https://archive.org/details/ornamentaldetail00blakuoft This one is a bit 'raw' but is from the 15th century.
  6. Wow! This book made my heart sing! 😍 What a find. At least we now know that the initials are RS on the emblem and not PS and it means Richard Smith. I recall we had a long convo about it maybe meaning something to do with Rosicrucian. More coincidences. Before even reading this I saw and saved a book on Renaissance Headpieces on Pinterest. I didn’t share it as it’s very, very light print (ink) but I’ll go and look again and link to it here.
  7. Pinterest is a much underrated research tool. I haven't got the time at the moment, but I just input Holinshed and got a whole page that looks like it may be worth scrolling through. https://www.pinterest.co.uk/search/pins/?q=holinshed&rs=typed Skipwith is perhaps another one to try. You never know what might be unearthed.
  8. Might be worth having a root around here using various search terms i.e., Bacon, John Dee etc https://digital.sciencehistory.org/
  9. I like this that Christie wrote: “Arguably, if you only look where the light is shining, you won’t see what is hidden in the dark. Bacon was not just any nobleman penning poetry and plays. If the reason for the secrecy is because it was Bacon and we don’t look into the matter deeply enough, we will never solve the mystery. I am not saying Bacon was the only writer, but it is illogical to assume this stellar writer, a major literary figure in his time, did not play a role.” I have to confess to not having read Elizabeth Winkler’s book but I read the comment by AP above. There was a reason I didn’t feel drawn to read it though. My experience was that before Elizabeth’s book was even published, when she had little engagement, she started promoting it on Twitter. I was delighted that someone new (I’d never heard of her before) was going to be writing about the SAQ. So, I immediately followed her and began RT’g almost everything she posted, so that it’d help people become aware of her book and the SAQ. I even commented on a couple of her posts. I felt a ‘sisterhood’. However, she clearly doesn’t practice reciprocity. I was never followed back. Comments weren’t ‘liked’ and I noticed she was selective in who she replied to. Slowly she began gaining followers and then when the book was published it became an instant success. Good on her. She’s clearly very articulate and intelligent, but by then I’d no desire to read it as I felt she couldn’t have failed to see my efforts to help her spread awareness (as Tom Keenan was very active at that time and he was often retweeting my RTs - and she’d followed him). I did wonder if it was because I was a Baconian but thought, no it can’t be. Fast forward to now and I’m left wondering again. Assumptions are dangerous things though and it’s never nice to be ‘judgey’ about someone when you don’t know what their side may be. It could be that she had an assistant handling her socials and would be mortified - but that doesn’t explain APs experience. The moral of the story that I take from all this though, is that one should always be on top of things like this. I’m banging on about it because I’ve noticed these common courtesies are falling by the wayside in many areas. I recently wrote a post about how few successful/famous people (and I’m not talking about Elizabeth here, I mean mega famous people) don’t even acknowledge contact from people who contact them. Here it is: This was posted way before Xmas and so obviously before any awareness of the comments of APs experience above, so the post had nothing whatsoever to do with this conversation, or Elizabeth who was the last thing on my mind when I wrote it.
  10. Not a podcast but have you seen this? If I have one observation, not a criticism just an obs, it is a very 1980’s presentation, which in an age replete with easy, free access to modern imagery is a little baffling, but she (Ros) makes some excellent and valid points. I know that when it comes to her questions about how open we all are to being wrong, I can hand-on-heart say, “very”. Balanced assessments are critical. On that note, I like this for the very balanced POVs - and it’s not about Marlowe, so thought I’d share. It’s an interesting watch.
  11. Hi I posted the Winkler interview yesterday (above). Next up in 2024 I think will be Barry’s podcast. I’m going to change the title from Podcast Requests to Podcasts as here’s another one. It was sent to me yesterday, but is from Sep 2023 and is from Robert Edward Grant with Alan Green and Richard Rudd. I’ll post without comment. However, Rob, there is some mention of a Sonnets Pyramid in here (twice). I am not sure if this is the same as yours? The first mention I think is around 45mins in. The second nearer the end. Anyway the whole thing is about Bacon, Shakespeare etc. I’m also going to post a 7-min podcast from “Freemasonry in 7 minutes or less” which is about my book, The Secret Work of an Age, but it has a brief exchange about Bacon at the end. https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/earnshaw-christopher/episodes/The-Secret-Work-of-an-Age-e2dfd2d Interest in the SAQ is certainly continuing to gather pace.
  12. If anyone is on Linked In I see Keith Browning is on there listed as a freelance writer in Chichester, UK. If you have a Linked In account it may show a contact email to invite him or at least ensure he knows about B’Hive. As I said, I think his blog, Shakespeare Re-Invented, on Wordpress is one of the most comprehensive looks at the SAQ, I’ve seen outside of APs. Speaking of the Authorship Question (AQ) I just posted the link to the Elizabeth Winkler episode of “Much Ado about the AQ” in the Podcast thread in Announcements.
  13. The Elizabeth Winkler podcast episode: https://youtu.be/33dhWGkXdv8?si=M9-lFpusOE8E0j0p
  14. We need Rob to work on it. You can see there are words that only come to light when you use certain exposures. I’ve underlined one in red it’s small writing behind the ‘scroll’ - but really I’m no further forward. Sorry.
  15. Okay, this is a huge leap and long shot but, looking at that book I just posted, I noticed there was some writing underneath 1614 and what looked like an Fr so I played around with the exposure Not convinced it is the same but I tried it with a slide from your video AP, and used Bacon’s other signature. Do you have a higher resolution copy as it looks like there may be some words above the headpiece - I’ve pointed to them. The stroke of Bacon’s signature ‘flourish’ is down, curve to left, then straight across to complete the F. In the marks on the Holinshed that stroke is there on one of the left ones, but they go the opposite way on the one to the right (1587 Skipworth image). Still it’s a distinctive stroke and he (Bacon, if it was him) wasn’t signing it, just drawing. It’s intriguing to change the exposure. On ‘The History of the World’ the name Rebecca shows up as do the initials f. c (or e) b in a row on the left hand page, plus lots of lines - but of course these could have been added at any point over 400+ years. PS it’s interesting that Bacon constructs his B as a 13!
  16. Thanks Eric, very kind! Thought I’d just add that I noticed the same Baconian header (as highlighted in The Phoenixes new video) on a book in the Wordpress blog. The book is ‘The History of the World’. Here’s a screenshot. By the way, the author of this blog is Keith Browning if anyone knows who he is? It was written in 2012 and last updated in 2016. He’d be a valuable member here - seems he is for a posse of writers though, as opposed to just Bacon. I’m very impressed by his attention to detail.
  17. Okay so I just looked and there are 14 references to Holinshed in the aforementioned wordpress blog! I have a suspicion that it is no coincidence that Rob happened across this blog at the same time as the Phoenixes were - presumably unknown to Rob at that time - compiling their latest paper. if we look at APs work and these 14 references the jigsaw may be complete? I also searched - use ctrl F - other names mentioned in the Phoenixes video. https://shakespearereinvented.wordpress.com/
  18. By some coincidence the blog I’ve been reading https://shakespearereinvented.wordpress.com/ goes into the most detailed look at the Jaggard lineage that I’ve ever read - even by AP. Worth a look?
  19. Shouldn’t it be dedicated to both of them! 🧐 Congratulations AP and Sally on yet another remarkable paper and video. The hours and hours of work you must put into these and the proof-reading and all the fine detail with citations and finding the images is truly, truly astounding. 👏
  20. I thought I’d take a look and got absolutely hooked. He goes into great detail and there are links to Bacon I had never come across before plus, he has a whole section on where I was christened (The Templar Church at Temple Balsall). He goes into far more detail about the place than I’d ever read, I attach just one page of it here - this I knew about - but he also shows a picture of my old primary school. You can’t see the school building itself as it’s behind the Church but this Church is where we had assembly most days as it was a CofE school. My pre school was off to the right of the picture. Memory lane! I haven’t finished it yet, it’s very long but thanks for sharing.
  21. Saw an old tweet on the Gray’s Inn site PDF of collection https://www.graysinn.org.uk/app/uploads/drupal-media/documents/library/Francis Bacon Collection - complete list of catalogued titles_0.pdf Apols if this is a duplicated post. Oh wow! Look at this picture of a book they have 😍 Hope they won’t mind me posting it. Amazing!!
  22. Latest news is, the guys have initiated a YouTube channel, hence the delay in the Elizabeth Winkler and Ros Barber podcasts (recorded before this but will follow). I suspect this channel will do rather well because there is no other niche of this type that I know of - i.e. people who are knowledgeable about the works of Shakespeare, but are still learning about all the different candidates and trying to assess the evidence and merits of each. It's fun and natural. Yes, they are going to make mistakes and yes, they will be led up this path and that, but hopefully eventually they will see that the evidence is stacked in favour of Bacon (or Bacon aided and assisted by his good pens, depending on your view). You can write to them to correct any errors you may hear or that you'd like them to know and I'm sure they'd be interested if anyone else wishes to be a guest after Barry in 2024. They mention the gmail address in the video.
  23. Hi Heather, A very warm welcome to B'hive! Kate
  24. Thanks Eric! I did another one called Decoding Michelangelo:The Sistine Secret which is up on YouTube shorts and my Pinterest page. I store things on Pinterest but don't use it as a social platform. https://www.pinterest.co.uk/thesecretwork/_saved/ Here's the link to the AI site as invdeo.ai takes you to a dud site. It is https://ai.invideo.io/login You can only export four videos for free before you have to join.. I'll use my other two credits later down the line. I did redo my original video from 2021 so I'll post that here. With this one it is also free but you can't get rid of the final 'credits' slide which is annoying. Thanks again. The Secret Work Of An Age (5).MP4 👆Ensure sound is on and click the arrow.
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