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  1. Steve Fuller, "The Prophetic Bacon: Response to Garber," Epistemology & Philosophy of Science, Volume 58, Issue 3, 2021. DOI https://doi.org/10.5840/eps202158345 "A mark of Bacon's long-term influence is that his conception of knowledge makes more sense now than it did to his contemporaries," he said. "Most of Bacon's contemporaries regarded knowledge as a state of mind, namely, one aligned with reality, which typically bore some clear relationship to God as the creator. A secular version of this idea is still taken for granted by philosophers." "In contrast, Bacon believed that knowledge was basically something produced--say, in a laboratory as the result of an experiment," he added. "In this conception, the scientist does not possess knowledge as a state of his or her own mind, but as something external to the scientist's mind. Words like 'finding', 'discovery,' and 'invention' capture this rather objectified conception of knowledge." "Moreover, unlike the authority granted to ancient and holy books, which are also arguably 'objectified knowledge,' Bacon stressed that one should be able to produce the knowledge for oneself," Fuller said. "Hence the great stress he placed on the idea of a 'scientific method.'" Fuller concludes with his argument for Bacon as a prophet. "
    4 points
  2. It’s vitally important that we ascertain the correct dates for documents that contain the (supposed) signature of Shakespeare, if we are ever going to unravel the authorship question. Stumbling across a picture of a seal* with Shakespeare’s signature, which I originally posted, in full, in the ‘Shakespeare Book Withdrawn’ thread, but have cropped here … ...has taken me off down a rabbit warren that could prove very important. *The book is from 1900. I follow a curator of Renaissance books from the Newberry Library online and I asked her in a DM, how common is it for big institutions to make a mistake in cataloguing and she said it is far more common than one might expect. So, the issue here is that the seal picture I found shows the date 1612. The only legal document Shakespeare signed that year was the Bolett-Mountjoy one. However. It transpires the 1900 picture is actually of the Blackfriars Gatehouse purchase and mortgage deeds. These are recorded as March 1613. One the 10th, one the 11th. If you look at these on shakespearedocumented.folger.edu and zoom in, on the one document, you can faintly see the 1612, and on the other it spells out the year in writing and clearly ends in the word twelve. Therefore, as the seal picture very clearly shows, the documents are 1612. Yet, this is on the website: I did, however, find this: It agrees with my observation and says 1612. Update: As a result of this initial post I decided to try and get to the bottom of all this and do a deep dive into the OS/NS calendar. I knew about Julian and Gregorian but didn't recognise the complexities. Never did I expect it to be so convoluted. The difficulties in accurately dating historical documents is not to be underestimated. If it interests you, please do watch the video I will post at the end of this thread.
    3 points
  3. CAXTON HALL LONDON https://www.londonremembers.com/memorials/caxton-hall-head-7-bacon CROYDON TOWN HALL LONDON https://www.londonremembers.com/memorials/04-croydon-francis-bacon HOME AND COLONIAL OFFICE WHITEHALL, WESTMINSTER LONDON https://www.londonremembers.com/memorials/colonial-office-b06-bacon
    3 points
  4. Perfect example of a true Baconian eager to support and defend their work with evidence in abundance! 🙂 All Jake needed to do was to explain a few of his decisions on how he came up with a’s and b’s when I could not duplicate his solution while showing him what I was seeing. If he had any kind of reasoning he could defend I would have tried further. Thank you A. Phoenix for demonstrating how we do what we do as real Baconians. A. Phoenix, Yann, Kate, Christie, Lawrence, Eric and a handful of others set the height of the Baconian bar on Truth here on the B’Hive. Wild ideas are OK, but we need to back them up with some kind of evidence, whether historical or repeatable cipher suggestions.
    2 points
  5. THE TRUE ROYAL BIRTH OF FRANCIS BACON This very important subject would benefit from an extensive bibliography. I have therefore thought it best to provide a list of the books and articles known to the present writer for the benefit of the reader and future researchers who are interested in the truth about the royal brith of Francis Bacon. (A. Phoenix, ‘The Pregnancy Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I and The Secret Royal Birth of Francis Bacon, Concealed Author of the Shakespeare Works’, (2020), pp. 1-86) The following list of books cover all aspects of the subject: Orville W. Owen, Sir Francis Bacon’s Cipher Story, 5 vols., (Detroit and New York: Howard Publishing Company, 1894); Elizabeth Wells Gallup, The Bi-literal Cypher of Sir Francis Bacon discovered in his works (Detroit, Michigan: Howard Publishing Company: London Gay and Bird, 1899); Elizabeth Wells Gallup, The Tragedy Of Anne Boleyn. A Drama In Cipher From In The Works Of Sir Francis Bacon (Detroit, Michigan, U.S.A.: Howard Publishing Company: London Gay and Bird, 1901); Elizabeth Wells Gallup, The Bi-literal Cypher of Sir Francis Bacon discovered in his works Part II (Detroit, Michigan: Howard Publishing Company: London Gay and Bird, 1901); Parker Woodward, The Early Life Of Lord Bacon (London: Gay and Hancock, Ltd, 1902); Harold Bayley, The Tragedy of Sir Francis Bacon (London: Grant Richards, 1902); Elizabeth Wells Gallup, Concerning The Bi-Literal Cypher Of Francis Bacon Discovered In His Works Pros And Cons Of The Controversy Explanations, Reviews Criticisms and Replies (Detroit, Michigan, U.S.A.: Howard Publishing Co: London Gay and Bird, n.d.); Elizabeth Wells Gallup, The Bi-literal Cypher Of Francis Bacon Discovered In His Works Deciphered Secret Story 1622 to 1671 The Lost Manuscripts Where They Were Hidden (Detroit, Michigan, U.S.A.: Howard Publishing Co: London Gay and Hancock, 1910); Granville C. Cunningham, Bacon’s Secret Disclosed In Contemporary Books (London: Gay and Hancock, Ltd, 1911); Parker Woodward, Tudor Problems Being Essays On The Historical And Literary Claims Ciphered And Otherwise Indicated by Francis Bacon (London: Gay and Hancock, Ltd, 1912); Amelie Deventer Von Kunow, Francis Bacon Last Of The Tudors, trans., Willard Parker (New York: published by Bacon Society of America, 1921); C.Y. C. Dawbarn, Uncrowned A Story Of Queen Elizabeth And The Early Life of Francis “Bacon” As Told In His Secret Writings And In Other Contemporary Records Of Her Reign (New York and Toronto: Longmans, Green and Co., 1923); S.A.E. Hickson, The Prince Of Poets And Most Illustrious Of Philosophers (London: Gay and Hancock, Ltd, 1926); F. L. Woodward, Francis Bacon And The Cipher Story (Adyar, Madras, 1932); A. B. Cornwall, Francis The First Unacknowledged King Of Great Britain And Ireland (Birmingham: Cornish Brothers Ltd., 1936); Alfred Dodd, The Marriage Of Elizabeth Tudor (London: Rider and Co., 1940); James Arthur, A Royal Romance (Adyar, Madras: The Theosophical Publishing House, 1941); Comyns Beaumont, The Private Life Of The Virgin Queen (London: Comyns (Publishers) Ltd, 1947); Margaret Barsi-Greene, I, Prince Tudor, Wrote Shakespeare An Autobiography From His Two Cipher In Poetry And Prose (Boston: Branden Press, 1973); Peter Dawkins, Dedication To The Light, The Bardic Mysteries The Love Affair of Elizabeth I and Leicester The Birth and Adoption of Francis Bacon (Francis Bacon Research Trust, 1984); Jean Overton Fuller, Francis Bacon A Biography (London and The Hague: East-West Publications, 1981); Alfred Dodd, Francis Bacon’s Personal Life-Story (London: Rider & Company, 1986); Ross Jackson, Shaker Of The Speare The Francis Bacon Story (Sussex: Book Guild Publishing, 2005); Virginia M. Fellows, The Shakespeare Code ((Snow Mountain Press, 2006); Lochithea, Sir Francis Bacon’s Journals The Rarest of Princes (New York: iUniverse, Inc, 2007); Deslie McClellan, Prince of Our Dreams (Emmaus, Pennsylvania, Playhouse Books, 2011). A list of articles on the subject published in Baconiana: William T. Smedley, ‘The Mystery Of Francis Bacon’, Baconiana, Vol. IX, No 33 (Third Series) January 1911 (London: Gay & Hancock, Ltd), pp. 5-34; Granville C. Cunningham, ‘John Barclay’s “Argenis” And Bacon’s Secret Life’, Baconiana, Vol. IX, No 35 (Third Series) July 1911 (London: Gay and Hancock, Limited), pp. 137-60; Granville C. Cunningham, ‘Queen Elizabeth’s Son’, Baconiana, Vol. XI, No 41 (Third Series) January 1913 (London: Gay and Hancock , Limited), pp. 62-63; Anon., ‘John Barclay’s Argenis’, Baconiana, Vol. XX. No. 78 (Third Series), February 1931 (London: The Bacon Society Incorporated Canonbury Tower, N. 1.), pp. 237-40; M. F. Bayley, ‘Was Francis Bacon Crowned King Of England?’, Baconiana, Vol. XXII. No. 86 (Third Series) July 1937 (London: The Bacon Society Incorporated Canonbury Tower, N. 1.), pp. 286-89; Parker Woodward, ‘What Lady Dorset Knew’, Baconiana, Vol. XXII. No. 86 (Third Series) July 1937 (London: The Bacon Society Incorporated Canonbury Tower, N. 1.), pp. 296-300; Henry Seymour, ‘A Discovery Of A Numerical Cypher Key In John Barclay’s Argenis’, Baconiana, Vol. XX. No. 78 (Third Series), February 1931 (London: The Bacon Society Incorporated Canonbury Tower, N. 1.), pp. 241-49; R.J.A. Bunnett, ‘John Barclay’s ‘Argenis’’, Baconiana, Vol. XXVII. No. 109, October 1943 (London: published by the Bacon Society Incorporated), pp. 179-83; M. F. Bayley, ‘The Royal Birth And Bacon’s Reasons For Secrecy’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXII, Spring 1948, No. 127 (London: published by the Bacon Society), pp. 93-95; James Arthur, ‘The Royal Birth Theme’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXII, Summer 1948, No. 128 (London: published by the Bacon Society), pp. 128-35; James Arthur, ‘The Royal Birth Theme’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXII, Autumn 1948, No. 129 (London: published by the Bacon Society), pp.85-91, 208; Comyns Beaumont, ‘The Royal Birth Of Francis Bacon Confirmed Historically’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXIV, 1950 No. 134 (London: published by the Bacon Society), pp. 21-28; Comyns Beaumont, ‘The Royal Birth Of Francis Bacon Confirmed Historically’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXIV, 1950 No. 135 (London: published by the Bacon Society), pp. 72-76; Edward D. Johnson, ‘The Bi-literal Cypher Of Francis Bacon’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXIV, 1950 No. 135 (London: published by the Bacon Society), pp. 93-103; Edward Johnson, ‘The Bi-literal Cypher Of Francis Bacon’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXIV, 1950 No. 136 (London: published by the Bacon Society), pp. 147-54; Comyns Beaumont, ‘The Royal Birth Of Francis Bacon Confirmed Historically’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXIV, 1950 No. 136 (London: published by the Bacon Society), pp. 155-61; R. J. Gentry, ‘Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester’, Baconiana, Vol. XXXIX, No. 152 September 1955 (London: published by the Francis Bacon Society Incorporated at Canonbury Tower), pp. 64-71; Pierre Henrion, ‘Secret Of State, Baconiana, Vol. XXXIX, No. 153 December 1955 (London: published by the Francis Bacon Society Incorporated at Canonbury Tower), pp. 105-8; Francis Carr, ‘Was Bacon the Son Of Queen Elizabeth?’, Baconiana, Vol. LXX No. 187 December 1987 (London: published by the Francis Bacon Society Incorporated at Canonbury Tower), pp. 40-45.
    2 points
  6. Jake is a member and had an awesome opportunity to support and defend his claims and he failed to do so. My take on him is that he latched on to the Oak Island popularity (read his Introduction here on the B’Hive) and made up some shocking theories to make a name for himself. Last I knew not a single serious Baconian has even been interested in his wild ideas with no evidence. I tried to duplicate his biliteral cipher decryption and found it to be weak, even fake. When questioned he has not been back. I am well aware my own theories are not popular, but I am always eager to share why I believe what I believe. Jake ran away and hid from anyone questioning his theories here. Just sayin’… 😉
    2 points
  7. This is the first post here on SirBacon forums that I am going to print out, Kate. Thank you for your research. I agree with you that everyone should always try to be scrupulous about accuracy, for errors get into the record and then they get repeated as if they were true. Everyone makes mistakes, but there's no shame in admitting them and trying to set the record straight. It's the scientific way.
    2 points
  8. https://currentsciencedaily.com/stories/608600956-british-professor-takes-up-cause-of-francis-bacon-scientific-revolutionary Steve Fuller, a professor of social epistemology at the University of Warwick in the United Kingdom, UK, takes up this question with regard to English scientist Francis Bacon (1561-1626), a prominent intellectual of his time, whose work spanned politics, philosophy, and science. Fuller's essay appears in a special 2021 issue of Epistemology & Philosophy of Science devoted to Bacon (Vol. 58, Issue 3, 2021).
    2 points
  9. 2 points
  10. Hi everyone, The two slides related with "Rosie Cross" in Cymbeline that I shared earlier in another Topic had been planned for "The Alchemical Quest", following the post I made last week. Here are all the slides that resume my point of view regarding this passage. https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/887/?zoom=850 For me, all is said in this passage, in which Petter Amundsen found few years ago Rosie Cross concealed in a 3,4,5 triangle. We have "halfe-way" hidden right above "That most venerable man, which I did call my Father". In my view, Bacon makes a reference to his Foster Father Nicholas Bacon, whom the motto was "mediocria firma" (Midway is safe) He tells us that he is a "Bastard" and : "my Mother seem'd the Dian of that time". Queen Elizabeth Tudor, the Virgin Queen, was seem'd the Dian of that time. https://www.selection.ca/arts-et-culture/21-photos-et-peintures-des-chiens-de-la-famille-royale-a-travers-lhistoire/ In the middle (mediocria), the values of the capital letters add to 62 or F.B. (F= 6 and B=2) And they deliver a message : I , SOW (SOW is the acronym of Son Of Wisdom or Son Of Widow) Be sure that facing the "halfe-way" I wondered if beyond "I, SOW", the remaining (lowercase) letters concealed a message or not. Here is what I found ... Notice that in the center, "so doth" provides us the letters S,O,D, SOD being the hebrew word for SECRET. And in the middle, I found the word "pomme" that is the french word for "apple", and the letters e,r,s,o allowing to make the words EROS (CUPID, Bastard Son of Venus) SORE and ROSE. The words "pomme" and "rose" in the context of a passage in which Bacon seemed to reveal he was the son of Queen Elizabeth immediatly reminded me another one of my discoveries ... And SORE, the another anagram of EROS and ROSE can be linked to the Pregnancy Portrait of Elizabeth I. See the great work of A Phoenix on the subject : https://www.academia.edu/45006558/The_Pregnancy_Portrait_of_Queen_Elizabeth_I_and_The_Secret_Royal_Birth_of_Francis_Bacon_Concealed_Author_of_the_Shakespeare_Works
    1 point
  11. It is difficult to talk about the content of books that I did not read. Like you, I had occasionally listening to the videos from Jake Roberts, and I watched the last one. All I can say is that, based on my own research, I do not think that Francis Bacon was the secret son of Mary, Queen of Scots, and Francis King of France. And here are two slides that resume my point of view regarding the" Key of the Rosie Cross". https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/SLNSW_F1/887/?zoom=850 For me, all is said in this passage, in which Petter Amundsen found few years ago Rosie Cross concealed in a 3,4,5 triangle. We have "halfe-way" hidden right above "That most venerable man, which I did call my Father". In my view, Bacon makes a reference to his Foster Father Nicholas Bacon, whom the motto was "mediocria firma" (Midway is safe) He tells us that he is a "Bastard" and : "my Mother seem'd the Dian of that time". Was Mary Queen of Scots seen as the Chaste Dian of her time ??? No ! But Queen Elizabeth Tudor, the Virgin Queen, was ! https://www.selection.ca/arts-et-culture/21-photos-et-peintures-des-chiens-de-la-famille-royale-a-travers-lhistoire/ In the middle (mediocria),the values of the capital letters add to 62 or F.B. (F= 6 and B=2) And they deliver a message : I , SOW (SOW is the acronym of Son Of Wisdom or Son Of Widow)
    1 point
  12. Hi A Phoenix, Sorry, but being wholly absorbed in "Hocus Pocus Junior" I did not take the time to thank you for sharing your great analysis of The Ultra Secret . I saw two or three more things that I will share with you but today time is short. Just one thing regarding this first page and the last one ... Funny coincidence, if we count KBE as one, the 33rd word is "who" and 33 = BACON And as good things come in threes there are two other "who". If we count "II" as two, as you suggest, then the second "who" is the 63rd word and the third "who" is the 81st word. And 33 + 63 + 81 = 33 + 144 = BACON + SIR FRANCIS BACON = 177 WHO ? BACON - SIR FRANCIS BACON - WILLIAM SHAKE-SPEARE ? We can't know if it was intended or a mere flight of fancy, but it fits well. And notice that the last page mentions the Battle of ... MIDWAY ! 🙂 Kind regards
    1 point
  13. Miquel (author of the book that started this topic) has recently used one of those AI translation services to narrate and translate his 1hr 42m video (of the presentation of his theory to an audience in Spain) from Catalan to English. I won’t share the link as it’s unlisted and needs to be done again as, unfortunately, the translation service is so bad it’s almost impossible to watch 😬but for anyone reading as a visitor to this site, here are just some of the parallels between Shakespeare and Don Quixote. These parallels are well known to us, and others are listed in the link to a guest post further up on ‘Quixote Parallels’. Basically, most of what Miquel covers is in the video by Aleix, linked to in the first post at the top of this thread. The author of Don Quixote and Shakespeare are one person. He thinks it’s Sirvent, we/I think it’s Bacon (or a maybe a Bacon workshop of “Good Pens”).
    1 point
  14. Never seen this one before! On Shakespeare Street!!!! Thanks Eric
    1 point
  15. OMG, what a great surprise today! 🙂
    1 point
  16. My first time seeing I am sure! 🙂
    1 point
  17. Statue of Sir Francis Bacon City of London School c. 1880 https://www.londonremembers.com/memorials/city-of-london-school-1-bacon
    1 point
  18. Bronze Statue of Sir Francis Bacon Library of Congress, Washington John Boyle, 1896
    1 point
  19. Arkwright Building, Shakespeare Street, Nottingham Statue of Sir Francis Bacon, c.1880, On same facade: Shakespeare, Newton, Milton. http://tonyshaw3.blogspot.com/2012/03/arkwright-building-nottingham-and-its.html
    1 point
  20. https://www.folger.edu/research/use-the-library/#preparing-for-your-visit If you were to do research at the Folger Library in Washington D.C. which books would you request to call up?
    1 point
  21. Good Call AP! You probably would have to show up in a Hazmat suit
    1 point
  22. Hi Lawrence, I would ask them to bring up from their secret vaults the manuscripts of all the Shakespeare poems and plays written and signed by the Great One! PS While they were down there I would humbly request they produce the unique copy of the 1587 Holinshed with its Baconian marginalia which the Great One used as a source for his Englihsh History Plays, etc. 🙂
    1 point
  23. Thank you, Eric. That was a pleasant, informative read. According to the Gray's Inn website, Bacon was one of the first to become a Bencher (a position of highest honor and leadership) at Gray's Inn (just four years after he was admitted to the bar), without having first been a Reader. He gave his first Reading in 1588 and his second in 1600. (from the Grays Inn website, "history, members, biographies, Francis Bacon," "history timeline, Francis Bacon" and "history, past members, benchers," cited in my book, Francis Bacon's Hidden Hand, p. 109). https://www.graysinn.org.uk/the-inn/history/ The Cravath article says "The Readings were lectures delivered by the members of the Society upon their election to the position of Bencher, the highest honor in the Society (Cravath article, 19-21, at 20). I had not realized there was quite so much revelry and masqueing going on as is reported here. I had heard of the famous 1594 "Christmas revels," of course; but according to this article, the revelry began "as early as All Hallow's day" for the 1594 revels reported in the Gesta Grayorum. It is notable that Francis Bacon was acknowledged "in his time [as] the chief spirit in all revels and masques" (Cravath article, p. 20. Cravath is an old, prestigious New York City law firm. ttps://www.cravath.com/our-story/history/index.html
    1 point
  24. Hi A Phoenix Not long ago you were walking in his very footsteps I imagine. Has there ever been a Francis Bacon trivia night? One of the questions might be: Other than on his wedding day, on what other occasion did Sir Francis Bacon wear the colour purple? Holborn: Inns of Court and Chancery Old and New London: Volume 2. Originally published by Cassell, Petter & Galpin, London, 1878. https://www.british-history.ac.uk/old-new-london/vol2/pp553-576 At Gray's Inn, Francis Bacon was not singular in loving rich clothes, and running into debt for satin and velvet, jewels and brocade, lace and feathers. Even of that contemner of frivolous men and vain pursuits, Edward Coke, biography assures us that 'the jewel of his mind was put into a fair case—a beautiful body with a comely countenance: a case which he did wipe and keep clean, delighting in good clothes well worn; being wont to say that the outward neatness of our bodies might be a monitor of purity to our souls.'" Francis Bacon's progress from Gray's Inn to Westminster, on the 7th of May, 1617, has been described by many writers, who, however widely they differ in estimating the moral worth of the new Lord Keeper, concur in celebrating the gorgeousness of his pageant:—"On the first day of Trinity Term, May 7th, says Mr. Hepworth Dixon, in his "Story of Lord Bacon's Life," "he rode from Gray's Inn, which he had not yet left, to Westminster Hall, to open the courts in state, all London turning out to do him honour, the queen sending the lords of her household, Prince Charles the whole of his followers—the lords of the council, the judges, and serjeants composing his immediate train. On his right hand rode the Lord Treasurer, on his left the Lord Privy Seal, behind them a long procession of earls and barons, knights and gentlemen. Every one, says George Gerard, who could procure a horse and a footcloth fell into the train, so that more than 200 horsemen rode behind him, through crowds of citizens and apprentice boys from Cheap, of players from Bankside, of the Puritan hearers of Burgess, of the Roman Catholic friends of Danvers and Armstrong; and he rode, as popular in the streets as he had been in the House of Commons, down Chancery Lane and the Strand, past Charing Cross, through the open courts of Whitehall, and by King Street into Palace Yard. He wore on that day, as he had worn on his bridal day, a suit of purple satin. Alighting at the gates of Westminster Hall, and passing into the Court, he took his seat on the bench; when the company had entered, and the criers commanded silence, he addressed them on his intention to reform the rules and practices of the court."
    1 point
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