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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/10/2023 in all areas

  1. Hi Eric, In his History of Islington John Nelson recorded the letter or letters as 'Fr'. As far as I am aware this is the earliest transcription of the Canonbury inscription. This work was published in 1811 some forty-odd years before W. H. Smith and Delia Bacon presented to the world the idea that Fr. Bacon was the secret author of the Shakespeare works followed in the next decades by the likes of Dr Orville Ward Owen and Elizabeth Gallup that he was the concealed royal son of Queen Elizabeth and Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester. Since this time it is a recorded fact that the inscription has been restored and repainted on at least one occasion and most likely over a period of some two hundred years on several occasions. If the curiously missing obliterated word was originally FRANCIS in light of the nineteenth century claims made by Owen and Gallup it might have been obliterated to maintain the historical secret of FB's royal birth and that he was the rightful King of England who should have succesed his mother Queen Elizabeth. With someone afterwards adding the lower horizontal stroke to make it look like an E. The vast majority of modern commentators since the articles by G. B. Rosher in Baconiana (1903, pp. 116-17; 1908, pp. 215-19) believe the letter in question is an E, and it looks that way now, although the editorial in the 1979 edition of Baconiana (p. 2) observed that 'The missing word begins with a strongly delineated F form, with a faint horizontal stroke apparently seeking to complete an E.' It most definitely appeared as an F followed by an r to Nelson when he examined it in 1811 before it was subject to restoration and re-painting. It is certainly all very mysterious and intriguing and we agree with you that it deserves to be forensically examined to determine what the original name or word actually was. Full work here: https://play.google.com/books/reader?id=l2LSAAAAMAAJ&pg=GBS.PA246&hl=en_GB
    2 points
  2. With regard to the topic of "concealment," I think - no, I know that in many places we get carried away with our interpretations of art. THAT BEING SAID, it is the same mentality that scoffs at the Baconian Thesis for its "confirmation bias" and "lack of true evidence" which defames Allisnum2er's initial post. Another thing I know for certain is that a broken clock is right once a day - That is to say that every idea, except for maybe the Flat Earth Conspiracy, has at least something to offer.)
    2 points
  3. Hi A.P. - I have to agree with Peter Dawkins. But what are the missing letters!? The Canonbury Tower inscription deserves to be forensically analysed to determine once and for all what the original Latin word was.
    2 points
  4. We would like to request an xRay like they did with John Dee surrounded by skulls in the painting we all know so well. 😉 https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/a-painting-of-john-dee-astrologer-to-queen-elizabeth-i-contains-a-hidden-ring-of-skulls-180957860/ A Painting of John Dee, Astrologer to Queen Elizabeth I, Contains a Hidden Ring of Skulls The life and work of John Dee contained a strange mix of science and magic Maris Fessenden Former correspondent January 18, 2016 A Victorian-era oil painting by artist Henry Gillard Glindoni captures one of the most enigmatic figures of Elizabethan England. In Glindoni's piece, Queen Elizabeth I sits in an elevated chair, surrounded by courtiers clothed in sumptuous fabric and the extravagant white neck ruffs of the time. All are peering with interest at the tall, black-robed figure of a man holding a vial over a small fire in a brazier by his feet. The figure is John Dee, the Queen's advisor and astrologer; a man who mixed science and the occult and believed he spoke to angels. The painting captures some of the intrigue and allure Dee held, but x-ray imaging commissioned for the Royal College of Physicians' new exhibition, "Scholar, courtier, magician: the lost library of John Dee," reveals just how unsettling his reputation became — it shows that Glindoni first painted Dee surrounded by a ring of human skulls, reports Mark Brown for the Guardian. Read more...>> Is that Bacon to Elizabeth's left?
    1 point
  5. Hi Rob, Here are the Dedications to Anthony Bacon by Josuah Sylvester in "Du Bartas, His divine weekes"(1633) https://books.google.fr/books?id=XN8rKQZfZwEC&pg=PP7&hl=fr&source=gbs_selected_pages&cad=2#v=onepage&q&f=false
    1 point
  6. The first one doesn't seem to give up much does it? It looks just about as cartoonish as the image we are given. That may suggest the image we are given is also based in a geometric portrayal.
    1 point
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