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  1. https://archive.org/details/cryptographyorhi00hulmuoft/page/n199/mode/2up
    3 points
  2. I love how so many old books are available on the Internet. Thanks for linking to this Natural Magick book, and for all your great insights.
    3 points
  3. I really do not believe in coincidence ... https://archive.org/details/naturalmagick00port/page/176/mode/2up 111 + 178 + 254 = 543 543 is an important number. This is the gematria of "Eyeh Asher Eyeh" ... " I AM THAT I AM" "And God said unto Moses, I Am That I Am: and he said, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I Am hath sent me unto you." Exodus 3 :14 (King James Bible) This is Magick ! 😉
    3 points
  4. Guess what we find page 33 ... ... The THREE PIGEONS !😀 https://archive.org/details/naturalmagick00port/page/n5/mode/2up
    3 points
  5. Thank you for sharing Kate ! I love the fact that Francis Bacon's Bilateral Cipher is revealed on pages 102 (ONE HUNDRED TWO = WILLIAM TUDOR I = FRA ROSI CROSSE) and 103 (SHAKESPEARE)! 😊 And the index is very interesting ! 😉
    3 points
  6. FRANCIS BACON, THE ADVANCEMENT OF LEARNING, CORIOLANUS AND MENENIUS'S FABLE OF THE BELLY. When writing The Advancement of Learning (1605) Bacon also had in mind Coriolanus. When the play was written still remains undetermined. It seems the first version of it cannot have been composed before 1605, since the first scene of the play draws on William Camden’s Remains of a Greater Work Concerning (1605) for one or two of its minor details with most Shakespeare commentators placing its date of composition or revision around 1607-8. There is no known performance of the play until 1681. It was first printed in the 1623 First Folio. The principle source of the play is the English translation of Plutarch’s Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans which includes Menenius’s fable delivered in the first scene of the play, for which Bacon also drew on a number of other sources: In writing Coriolanus, Shakespeare depended primarily upon Plutarch…he also had recourse to Livy, the chronicler of Coriolanus, Marcus Curtius, and the fortunes of republican Rome. It has long been recognized that lines 134-139 in Menenius’ fable of the belly, those concerned with the distribution of nourishment through the blood derive from Livy’s, not Plutarch’s version of the tale. Those six lines are important in that they provide tangible evidence that Livy’s Ab Urbe Condita was in Shakespeare’s mind when he was meditating Coriolanus. But they matter far less than a series of overall attitudes, attitudes peculiar to this play, which I believe Shakespeare owed not to any one, particular passage in Livy, but to his history as a whole….1 The work closest to Coriolanus in date, which refers to the Menenius fable is Bacon’s The Advancement of Learning: First therefore amongst so many great Foundations of Colledges in Europe, I finde strange that they are all dedicated to Professions, and none left free to Artes and Sciences at large. For if men iudge that learning should bee referred to action, they iudge well: but in this they fall into Error described in the ancient Fable: in which the other parts of the body did suppose the stomache had beene ydle, because it neyther performed the office of Motion, as the lymmes doe, nor of Sence, as the head doth: But yet notwithstanding it is the Stomache that digesteth and distributeth to all the rest: So if any man thinke Philosophie and Vniuersalitie to be idle Studies; hee doth not consider that all Professions are from thence serued, and supplyed. And this I take to bee a great cause that hath hindered the progression of learning, because these Fundamental knowledges haue bene studied but in passage.2 In discussing the wide influence of Aristotle’s Politics in ‘Coriolanus, Aristotle, And Bacon’, its author F. N. Lees points out Bacon’s essay Of Friendship with its ‘god or beast’ idea, an element of Aristotelian thought ‘embedded’ in the ‘consciousness’ of Bacon which rests behind Coriolanus, suggests that ‘Bacon knew Coriolanus before he wrote the essay.’3 For which there seems a good chance as he wrote both of them! 1. Anne Barton, ‘Livy, Machiavelli, And Shakespeare’s ‘Coriolanus’’, Shakespeare Survey, 38 (1985), p. 116. 2. Michael Kiernan, ed., The Advancement of Learning (Oxford Clarendon Press, 2000), pp. 57/252; G. W. Kitchin, ed., (introduction by Arthur Johnston) The Advancement of Learning (London: Everyman Library, 1973), pp. 64, 241; Arthur Johnston, ed., The Advancement of Learning and New Atlantis (Oxford Clarendon Press, 1974), pp. 62, 263; Brian Vickers, Francis Bacon A Critical Edition Of The Major Works (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1996), pp. 171, 611. 3. F. N. Lees, ‘Coriolanus, Aristotle, And Bacon’, Review in English Studies, 2 (1950), p. 123.
    2 points
  7. Hey Kate, Watching your video yesterday you brought up the Double A's, also "AV" which makes the six-pointed Star I enjoy so much in my Sonnets Dedication solution: Sonnets Dedication Poem Solution on B'Hive Busy day, yet AVON (52 Reverse cipher which is WILL Simple cipher and 74 Kaye cipher the Simple cipher of WILLIAM and TUDOR) with your visual "AV" concept on my mind. AV = 21 Simple cipher, or B=2 and A=1, or BA and the six-pointed Star as well. (B)2+(A)1=(C)3, so now we have BAC. What follows? ON to make BACON? (AVON-AV=ON) Sweet Swan of BACON.
    2 points
  8. Hi Kate, We have just noticed that SWAN is 53 in simple cipher, which also represents SOW in simple cipher, which stands for Bacon's Rosicrucian, Sons of Wisdom.
    1 point
  9. A. Phoenix, Thank you for a new way to understand Sonnet 8. This line is Line 110 of the Sonnets: Who all in one,one pleasing note do sing: It adds up to 158 Short cipher, the Simple cipher of ELIZABETH TUDOR. So these two lines are Lines 110 and 111 of the Sonnets: Who all in one,one pleasing note do sing: Whose speechlesse song being many,seeming one, Usually going from 11 to 111 is significant in the Sonnets Pyramid. We see above two ones on Line 110, then the third one at the end of Line 111. Typically we can see a 157 or 287 when finding 11 and 111. The next line, Line 112 and the last line of Sonnet 8 is: Sings this to thee thou single wilt proue none. That line adds up to 201 Short cipher. TWO HUNDRED ONE is 157 Simple, 168 Reverse, 58 Short, and 287 Kaye ciphers, the same four ciphers as WILLIAM TUDOR I. Once again in the Sonnets we have an 11 and 111, this time with the word "one" three times and the next line holds both Seal numbers. The last word of Line 109 is "mother" (Resembling sier,and child,and happy mother,), then Line 110 adds up to 158 Short cipher which is the Simple cipher of ELIZABETH TUDOR. That reminds me of where Line 32 ends with the word "mother" and line 33 asks "For where is she so faire whose vn-eard wombe" which takes us to Sonnet 33 where the first 14 letters add up to 158 Simple, 192 Reverse, 59 Short, and 340 Kaye ciphers the exact same four ciphers of ELIZABETH TUDOR. The 11 letter Simple cipher of Sonnet 33 is 111. What an amazing web of numbers and words that tell a story did Bacon weave.
    1 point
  10. Hi Christina, In the late 1560s, the queen’s cousin and the premier peer and only duke of the realm Thomas Howard, fourth Duke of Norfolk, a regional prince and senior member of the Privy Council, was aware of the secret private marriage of Elizabeth and Dudley and that she had given birth to an unacknowledged son and heir about which it seems he left a hint to posterity. In his Confessions for High Treason Norfolk records when the court was at Guildford seeing a young child with both Elizabeth and Leicester in her private apartments delightfully playing a lute and singing to them: 'when the court was at Guildford, he came unaware into the queen’s privy chamber, and found her Majesty sitting on the threshold of the door, listening with one ear to a little child, who was singing and playing on the lute to her, and with the other to Leicester, who was kneeling by her side. The duke, a little confused, no doubt at interrupting a party so conveniently arranged, drew back; but her Majesty bade him enter. Soon after Leicester rose, and came to Norfolk, leaving the Queen listening to the child, and told him, “that he was dealing with the queen in his behalf when he approached;”…1 Knowing the private marriage of Queen Elizabeth and Dudley and that she had given birth to an unacknowledged heir to the throne was a heavily guarded state secret while fighting for his life on a charge of treason and the future of his family, he was careful not to be too specific about what he was witnessing, and did not, or dared not, name the child, whom he almost certainly knew was their secret royal offspring. How then can we be confident the child singing and playing the lute to Elizabeth and Leicester seen by Norfolk was their concealed son Francis? The answer has always been hidden in plain sight right in front of the eyes of the world as this and more occasions like it were later recalled by Bacon in one of his Shakespeare Sonnets: Mark how one string, sweet husband to another, Strikes each in each by mutual ordering, Resembling sire and child and happy mother, Who all in one pleasing note do sing. [Sonnet 8]2 1. Agnes Strickland, The Life of Queen Elizabeth (London: published by J. M. Dent, 1910), p. 265. 2. As far as the present writer is aware the first to point this out was Alfred Dodd in The Marriage Of Elizabeth Tudor (London: Rider and Co., 1940), pp. 46-7; see also by the same author Francis Bacon’s Personal Life-Story (London: Rider & Company, 1986), p. 64.
    1 point
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