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  1. London Library accused of hosting ‘anti-intellectual conspiracy theory’ that Shakespeare was a woman The institution is running a panel discussion with Elizabeth Winkler, the author of ‘Shakespeare Was a Woman and Other Heresies’ By Ewan Somerville ( has taken the uneducated hubris slant on the authorship) https://archive.ph/2024.04.13-150153/https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2024/04/13/london-library-accused-hosting-anti-intellectual-conspiracy/
    6 points
  2. Well, I may be wrong, but I don't think any of those are the article I'm looking for, that I remember reading once. I will keep looking. Thank you so much, A Phoenix, for taking the time to find those for me in the Baconiana index. The first article in the list you gave me was by Parker Woodward. It was good. The next two were by Alicia Leith, one long piece and a shorter, more summarizing piece later on--both good. The last one was by R. L. Eagle. He was skeptical that Puttenham was Bacon, but I don't believe he spelled out exactly why he thought Begley was wrong. He thought the author behind the pseudonym Puttenham was someone known to Anthony and Francis, though. This surprised me. I thought Begley gave good reasons why he thought Bacon was the author. Enough for now, however.
    5 points
  3. FRANCIS BACON AND HIS ANONYMOUS AUTHORSHIP OF THE ARTE OF ENGLISH POETRIE AND HIS SHAKESPEARE POEMS AND PLAYS In Bacon’s Nova Resuscitatio or the Unveiling of his Concealed Works and Travels Rev. Walter Begley devoted eighty pages to revealing and confirming his authorship of The Arte of English Poesie.1 The relatively little known and even less read work has been systematically ignored, overlooked and suppressed by orthodox Shakespeare scholars and historians of Elizabethan poetry and literature, as well as the Fraudulent Friedmans, for reasons that will become only all too apparent.2 Begley immediately examined and dismantled the transparent charade of identifying both Richard and George Puttenham with its authorship before presenting overwhelming external and internal evidence that it was anonymously written by Bacon. 1. Walter Begley, Bacon’s Nova Resuscitatio Or the Unveiling of his Concealed Works and Travels (London: Gay and Brid, 1905), I, pp. 1-80. See also William Booth, Some Acrostic Signatures Of Francis Bacon (London: Archibald Constable & Co., Limited, 1909), pp. 94-112, 120-23. 2. The Friedmans mention the name Puttenham once throughout their work see William F. Friedman and Elizebeth S. Friedman, The Shakespearean Ciphers Examined An Analysis Of Cryptographic Systems Used As Evidence That Some Other Author Than William Shakespeare Wrote The Plays Commonly Attributed To Him (Cambridge University Press, 1958), p. 177 ‘A profusion of Baconian pseudonyms emerge, including, Puttenham, Green, Peele, Spenser and Marlowe …’ and see also p. 132 ‘For good measure he added Webster’s Arte of Poesie to the list (the work is enormously popular among Baconians).’
    5 points
  4. FRANCIS BACON AND HIS ANONYMOUS AUTHORSHIP OF THE ARTE OF ENGLISH POETRIE AND HIS SHAKESPEARE POEMS AND PLAYS The first English writer to use the word anagram was the anonymous author of The Arte of English Poesie still wrongly attributed by orthodox scholarship to one George Puttenham.1 After ‘a minute and exhaustive analysis of the work, tracing every contemporary allusion to its date would’ writes its editor Edward Arber ‘probably but confirm…that it was written about 1585, and then as, with but few corrections and additions, it was printed in 1589,’2just prior to the period marking the known golden dawn of the Shakespearean era. It was printed by Richard Field the printer of Bacon’s two Shakespeare narrative poems Venus and Adonis (1593) and The Rape of Lucrece (1594). Opposite the title page of The Arte of English Poesie is an engraving of his royal mother Queen Elizabeth. A Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece stands above a dedication to Bacon’s nominal uncle Sir William Cecil, Lord Burghley married to Lady Mildred Cooke, the elder sister of Bacon’s adopted mother Lady Anne Cooke Bacon. In the dedication observes Arber ‘the printer was or feigned to be in ignorance of its author’.3 The true author of the dedication signed with the initials of its printer Richard Field was Bacon purporting to be Field, so I think we can confidently say as he wrote it, Bacon knew the author was himself! In the dedication Bacon assuming the identity of Field tells Cecil that it had come into his hands ‘without any Authours name’ and was ‘by the Authour intended to our Soueraigne Lady the Queene’, but he gave no reason why she had been replaced by Burghley.4 With priceless Baconian wit and irony Bacon states in the text that Elizabethan poets (himself included) have written poetry that was published anonymously or without their own names to it-the very modus operandi he himself adopted when publishing his Shakespeare poems and plays under his pseudonym William Shake-speare: Now also of such among the Nobilitie or gentrie as to be very well seene in many laudable sciences, and especially in making or Poesie, it is so come to passe that they haue no courage to write and if the haue, yet they are loathe to be knowen of their skill. So as I know many notable Gentlemen in the Court that haue written commendably and suppressed it agayne, or els suffred it to be published without their owne names to it.5 1. It is pointed out by Andrew Sofer in‘All’s I-L-L That Starts “I’Le”:Acrostic space and Ludic Reading in the Margins of the Early Modern Play-Text’, Renaissance Drama, 48 (2020), that the anonymous author of The Arte of English Poesie (whom he mistakenly takes to be George Puttenham) ‘is the first writer to use the word anagrame’. 2. Edward Arber, ed., The Arte of English Poesie (London: 1869), p. 4. 3. Ibid., p. 3. 4. Anon., The Arte Of English Poesie. Contriued into three Bookes: The first of Poets and Poesie, the second of Proportion, the third of Ornament (London: printed by Richard Field, 1589), B3r. 5. Edward Arber, ed., The Arte of English Poesie (London: 1869), Book 1, p. 37.
    5 points
  5. Hi A Phoenix Great research cogently written. Very difficult subject.
    5 points
  6. US & FRENCH INTELLIGENCE & BACONIAN CIPHERS It starts by stating that perhaps more has been written about the Bacon Bi-literal Cipher than any other single form of secret communication. The opening statement is followed by a description of the Bacon Bi-literal Cipher ‘the entire alphabet may be expressed by the two letters a and b in combinations of five’. What it does not say is whether or not this is the same combination of a and b letters for each letter of the alphabet as originally given by Bacon in De Augmentis. It is not. The example given here radically differs from the form in which it was first presented by Bacon. The first three letters of the alphabet in the article A, B, and C, are given the same a and b combination as given by Bacon. But from D onwards the assignment of a’s and b’s differs from the combinations given by Bacon. The letter combination in the article for the letter D is the letter for E in the original bi-literal cipher, as is the case for E, F, G, H, I, which in the original bi-literal cipher represented I, R, S, T, W, respectively. Moreover the letter combinations alongside the letters J, K, L, M, N, O and U in the article find no equivalent in the original given by Bacon. In addition the illustration in the article does not follow the 24 letter Elizabethan alphabet where I and J and U and V were interchangeable and nor does it follow the modern 26 letter alphabet. The illustration provides only twenty five letters-completely omitting the letter W. These deviations, are of course, not mistakes but deliberate, done with a definite purpose. This Rosicrucian device of making what seems to be a ‘mistake’ is designed to attract the attention of the initiated. Outside the bi-literal illustration in the column directly concerning Bacon and his bi-literal cipher the rest of the text (‘aaaab’ is counted as 5) comprises of 287 words Fra Rosicrosse in kay cipher which minus the block ‘aaaab’ 287-5=282 Francis Bacon in kay cipher. If the number 282 is added to the numerical equivalent of the missing W in simple cipher (21): 282+21=303 which when the null ‘0’ is dropped it leaves 33 Bacon in simple cipher. Thus we have in a combination of kay and simple cipher Francis Bacon, Shakespeare, Brother of the Rosy Cross. Paper: https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/ a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.
    5 points
  7. Phenomenal research AP. 👏 Fascinating finds. I’ve been doing my own digging around ciphers/codes etc again over the last week. It started off as part of a longer deep-dive into Elias Ashmole (which I’ll post elsewhere) and I came across a very interesting couple of quotes. So, here’s one of the slides from that presentation with the quotes from Ashmole. As you can see Ashmole was specifically referring to information hidden in poetry, and then it goes on to list the 4 methods used, if things were hidden but intended to be found by those who knew how to look. Interesting that it basically says there would be no dispute about what was being conveyed, once found. I’ll add Bacon’s quote too from Advancement of Learning Book 6
    5 points
  8. BACONIAN CIPHERS AND BRITISH INTELLIGENCE Note on the Baconian Cipher and its particular method and application by Bacon himself This cipher, which is described in most elementary text-books on Cryptography, is a form of simple “substitution”-that is, one in which the “cryptogram” contains, instead of the actual letters in the “clear,” other letters which have been substituted. The letters used as substitutes may be employed singly (i.e. one letter or point in a series of numbers in the cryptogram representing one letter in the “clear”), as in the cipher invented and used by Julius Caesar, or in that which was used by Marmont during the later stages of the Peninsular campaign, and which (being more scientific, attempting to baffle solution effected by means of counting frequences of the occurrence of similar letters) is said to have puzzled Wellington’s staff. The letters of the cryptogram may also be used in groups, each group representing one letter of the “clear,” and this is the plan adopted by Bacon. He employs the permutations and combinations of any two letters of the alphabet-say A and B-arranged in groups of five. For example: A A A A A = A A A A A B = B A A A B B = C and so on. Well Chosen Types The application of the cipher by Bacon is dependent entirely on the use by the printer of two founts of type, which we may call fount A and fount B. The slighter the distinction between the impressions of the types of the two founts, the greater, obviously, will be the security against detection. The types actually used in the editions of the various authors of which the text was used by Bacon for communicating his story were singularly well chosen for the purpose. Some of the letters are quite distinct from each other, and this Bacon doubtless thought (because he dared not overdo the security touch) would be sufficient to put an acute searcher, who had read Bacon's own description of the cipher in his “De Augmentis,” on the trail. Many of the letters, on the other hand, are so like each other that it requires very keen vision, or even a magnifying glass to distinguish them. This would, thought Bacon, afford the required degree of concealment from the common reader, whose curiosity might be aroused. Paper: https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/ a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity. MI6 HQ VAUXHALL BRIDGE
    5 points
  9. BACONIAN CIPHERS AND BRITISH INTELLIGENCE Around the time General Cartier was endorsing Mrs Gallup’s bi-literal cipher decipherments in a series of articles in French periodicals, an article appeared in the now obscure and defunct Cassell’s Weekly apparently written by a British intelligence officer who had secretly operated in France throughout the first World War at GHQ. The virtually unknown article fortuitously appeared exactly three hundred years after the publication of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio in the May edition of 1923. The article is prefaced by a note on the author from the Editor. There are only two copies known to exist of this May 1923 edition. One is housed at the British Library. This copy is in such poor condition it can only-with permission-be examined at the library. The other known copy is held by the Bodleian Library, Oxford. As far as I am aware the main body of the text has not hitherto been reproduced in any scholarly journal or publication. Given its relative inaccessibility I have decided to reproduce the Editor’s note and the text written by Major Stevenson (a pseudonym?), in full: BACON’S REAL LIFE STORY An Expert’s Note on the Secret Cipher [Major Stevenson, who has written the following note on the Baconian cipher, is an expert of high standing on all questions of codes. He was a well known, mysterious and ubiquitous figure at G. H. Q. and over the whole front in France throughout the war, being known as the “Hush Hush” man-the deciphering of enemy messages being regarded necessarily as ultra secret. A discovery of the late Colonel Fitz-Gerald, Private Secretary to Lord Kitchener, Major Stevenson had triumphs of far-reaching importance, although known only to a handful of higher Staff Officers. In the early days he was pitted single-handed against a galaxy of German Professors, and at the time of the first Zeppelin raids Lord Kitchener himself took the keenest personal interest in this struggle of wits. A scholar, a cousin to R.L.S., it is not necessary further to emphasize both his interest in literature and his authority when discussing ciphers.-Editor.] Paper: https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/ a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity. Thames House MI5
    5 points
  10. FRANCIS BACON, HIS AUTHORSHIP OF THE SHAKESPEARE WORKS & FRENCH INTELLIGENCE The treatise is divided along three distinct lines: historical exposition, cryptography by means of letters and numerals, and cryptography by means of figures and symbols. In the first part devoted to an historical survey of cryptography, on reaching the seventeenth century, the two French authors in summarising General Cartier’s articles provided the French reader with a clear concise description and demonstration of the Bacon Bi-literal Cipher. The two French cipher experts acknowledge that most of the information relating to Bacon’s cipher is taken from the articles written by General Cartier. They also reveal they were aware that in the eighteenth century Horace Walpole in “Doutes historiques” (historical doubts) had questioned whether William Shakespeare was the true author of the works bearing his name and that later writers had attributed the Shakespeare works to Bacon before starting with reference to Mrs Gallup’s bi-literal decipherments ‘The most recent decryptings seem to confirm this hypothesis’:1 The seventeenth century is the period in history during which cipher reached its highest degree of perfection. It is not a century of inventions, since at this time the great systems were already in existence. The art of cryptography and that of decrypting were nevertheless at this time the object of so great an interest on the part of the kings and princes, that great minds did not scorn to make deep studies of these sciences, and the ciphers of the period acquired in consequence a great reputation for security, since some among them have resisted up to our time all the efforts of cryptanalysts. In the first half of this century, in the times of Elizabeth, James I, and Louis XIII, lived Bacon, Rossignol, and Cospi. The first, philosopher and savant, as well as politician and orator, has written works in the plain text of which is hidden an enciphered text, of which the decrypting is at present hardly started…. Sir Francis Bacon, Baron of Verulam, better known under the name of Chancellor Bacon or Lord Bacon, member of the Council under Elizabeth, the Lord Chancellor under the reign of James I (1561-1626), was the inventor of a cryptographic system to which he gave his name and by means of which he introduced into his works texts of ciphers. The study of these texts undertaken many years ago by specialists and continued in our time under the direction of General Fabyan, U.S.A., has brought out results which have recently been revealed by General Cartier, and tend to bring in a new light on an historical problem which has long occupied public opinion, namely the possible identification of Lord Bacon with William Shakespeare. The process of Lord Bacon was first mentioned by him in the 1605 edition of his work “Advancement of Learning” which consisted of only two volumes, and was described very explicitly in the larger edition of 1623 of the same work, published in Latin under the Title “De dignitate et augmentis scientiarum,” comprising nine volumes. General Cartier thinks that at the time of the first publishing, Bacon, fearing that the discovery of his cipher might cost him his head-the English tribunals, at this time, considered the mere fact of having corresponded in secret characters as an aggravating circumstance-preferred not to mention his system except in vague terms without describing its characteristics. Eighteen years later, experience having shown him that nobody had appeared to doubt the explanation which he had made of his cipher and desiring that the story which he had hidden with so much care and which one recognized to be the secret history of his life and of his time, should not remain forever unknown, he gave a detailed description of a cipher called by him “bilateral” cipher, accompanied by very explicit example, so that there should be no doubt on the manner in which it should be used…. The process of Lord Bacon has been mentioned by Kluber, Vesin, and Fleissner von Wostrowitz. A hundred year later (1685), a German author Frederici described a similar system, of which he stated that he was not the inventor and which the original, according to him, dated back to a period before that of Bacon. In reality, this system is that of Bacon's slightly modified…. Bacon’s system, according to the data given by Gen. Cartier, was used by Bacon in his “Novum Organum” and in the works of his contemporaries, Bright, Burton, Peele, Spenser, Ben Jonson, and Shakespeare. According to recent information, the decrypting done on the above texts by Mrs. Gallup and Mrs. Wells will have brought to light a “Life of Bacon,” by himself, containing matter of the greatest interest concerning the history of England at the time of Elizabeth and concerning the true identity of Shakespeare. Frederici’s system, besides, would have served to encipher the inscription of 1616, on Shakespeare’s original tombstone, in the church at Stratford-on-Avon. …The systems of Bacon and Frederici are double substitutions of which the only difficulty, once the key is known, is the identification of the typographical character used. The operations of encipherment and decipherment, theoretically simple, are in practice extremely long and complicated, which explains the difficulties which the cryptanalysts have had to overcome and the time which it has taken them to obtain results….Let us add that the researches should not be limited to the books printed in England at the time of Bacon and Shakespeare, but should cover as well the editions of the seventeenth century, which reveal upon minute examination the different typographical forms which are the base of the above-mentioned cryptographic systems.2 1. Andre Lange and E. E. Soudart, Treatise on Cryptography An English Translation Of The Original Traite De Cryptographie (Laguna Hills, California, Aegean Park Press, 1981), p. 15. 2. Ibid., pp. 12-15. Paper: https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/ a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.
    5 points
  11. BACONIAN CIPHERS & FRENCH INTELLIGENCE This French work originally published in 1925 with a new edition in 1935 is virtually unknown to and unread by the English speaking world and notice of it does not appear in the Friedman’s The Shakespearean Ciphers Examined. The motivation and purpose for producing Traite De Cryptographie were concisely stated by Lange and Soudart senior members of French Cipher Intelligence in their preface: There exist, to our knowledge, very few works dealing with Cryptography and Decrypting. Several are notable. But, in addition, as such works, to be consulted with profit, require a fairly extensive knowledge of foreign languages, the mass of information which they contain makes them hard to read for those who desire to obtain enough of the general principles to embark upon the details of practice. Besides, none of these books treats the subject in its entirety: Each treats only one of the sides. Outside of a brochure by Kerckhoffs, on military cryptography, published in 1883, which is not up to date as to the systems now in use, we know of no methodical exposition, at once compact and complete, of the science of Cryptography and the art of decrypting. The work hereinafter given has for its object the bridging of this gap. Ten years spent in cipher work, during the World War at G. H. Q., and after the war for our personal edification, have led us to undertake this task. The complexity of the questions treated has made it necessary for us above all to be clear, and to reject deliberately technical expositions susceptible of making the demonstrations heavy and tiresome. Nevertheless, one will find in the following chapters sufficient information to permit those interested to carry their researches further, notably a bibliography more complete than any heretofore published, together with the publishers of the more important references. The bibliography alone is of inestimable value, most of the works listed being today out of print (unfindable). We have written this book for the general public, always so open to all that touches on science. We have written it also, more especially, for officers, and, let us add, as much for Reserve officers as for those on the active list. One must not forget that it is the Reserve officers who performed most of the cipher work for the general staffs during the entire period of the World War, and that the Cipher Bureau at G. H. Q. was headed by Reserve officers from February 1917 until demobilization. Those who read this may perhaps in their turn be called to fill the posts which their elders once had the honour to hold. This book will be, we believe, of some help in their beginnings, and we hope will enable them to avoid the difficulties which we had when we started. We think that cryptographic studies should be of interest to every Frenchman. The services rendered in the war by decrypting units have shown the worth of cryptanalysis. Since the war, a recrudescence of interest has taken place along these lines. May the explanations to follow bring a modest, but efficacious, contribution to these attractive studies.1 1. Andre Lange and E. E. Soudart, Treatise on Cryptography An English Translation Of The Original Traite De Cryptographie (Laguna Hills, California, Aegean Park Press, 1981), preface. Paper: https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/ a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.
    5 points
  12. Hi Putting this here as I think it's such a great find, but feel free to move it to books section - just wanted to flag it up in case it is largely unknown. The Rare Book Room http://www.rarebookroom.org/indexA.html You'll find a treasure trove of digitised books. Looks like over one hundred titles to me. The site is old but click on the book icon next to each book, double click on a page and it will appear in a separate window. From there use the small plus and minus facility to zoom in and the resolution becomes excellent. There is an extensive collection of the old quartos of Shakespeare for research, and far more books from authors such as Seneca, Ovid, Virgil , Euclid, Galileo, Kepler, that Bacon and his friends would undoubtedly have been reading in the 1500s. I'm trying to work my way through all the ones that predate 1626 and the death of Bacon. Enjoy
    5 points
  13. This has often made me chuckle: ref: the epitaph under the effigy of the Stratford monument: we are told to "stay" and "read if thou canst" who is "with in this monument" and a litter further on we are told the name "decks" or decorates "this tombe" but we know the monument is not a tomb, and anyway the actual tomb has no name other than "IESVS" inscribed. The question is who's name is hidden, and how can we extract it? Is anyone interested enough to chat about this subject?
    4 points
  14. SIX PRIMARY DOCUMENTS CONFIRMING FRANCIS BACON IS SHAKESPEARE 1] FRANCIS BACON’S PRIVATE NOTEBOOK THE PROMUS OF FORMULARIES AND ELEGANCIES A MAJOR SOURCE FOR HIS SHAKESPEARE POEMS AND PLAYS In ordinary circumstances this contemporary manuscript document named the Promus of Formularies and Elegancies would be well known to every Bacon and Shakespeare scholar and student of English literature around the world. Bacon’s unique private notebook held at the British Library contains a total of 51 leaves numbered pages 83 to 132 all written (apart from some French proverbs) in his own hand. The Folio numbered 85 is headed ‘Promus’ and beneath it appears the date ‘Dec. 5, 1594’ with the Folio numbered 114 headed ‘Formularies Promus’ carrying the date ‘27 Jan. 1595’ (i.e., January 1596). It contains 1655 entries jotted down as an aid to his memory. The entries include single words, phrases, lines, turns of speech, metaphors, similes, aphorisms, and various moral and philosophical observations. These include entries drawn from the Bible; Latin, French, Italian, Spanish, and English proverbs; and lines and verses from classical poets and dramatists, among them, Virgil, Ovid, Seneca, Horace, and Terence. It is the source of several hundred resemblances, correspondences and parallels found throughout his Shakespeare poems and plays. PAPER: https://www.academia.edu/95355522/Francis_Bacons_Private_Manuscript_Notebook_Known_as_the_Promus_of_Formularies_and_Elegancies_The_Source_of_Several_Hundred_Resemblances_Correspondences_and_Parallels_Found_Throughout_his_Shakespeare_Poems_and_Plays VIDEO: https://youtu.be/LTfUbKb7KqU 1 MIN TRAILER VIDEO: https://youtu.be/DQMzHdhXeXE
    4 points
  15. The New Gorhambury Data Portal is now open to the public, and represents a major escalation in my War of Aggression against "Ignorance of How the Baconian Word Cipher Actually Works". At the site there are links to various assorted introductory pages I've installed already on New Gorhambury. One of the primary goals of this project always has been to act as a repository of online documents for Baconian researchers, with the hope of getting additional people interested. I am here to support the efforts of those who would be interested enough to do some research independently. https://gorhambury.org/word-cipher-data-portal/
    4 points
  16. Lovely day had by all, thanks Eric. I shall do a write up of the highlights for everyone!
    4 points
  17. Hi Phoenixes How was your grand day out? I just wanted to say many thanks for these six summaries of primary source evidence. For anyone new to the forum and the authorship question, these notes are essential reading.
    4 points
  18. SIX PRIMARY DOCUMENTS CONFIRMING FRANCIS BACON IS SHAKESPEARE 6] The Memoriae Honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis De Vervlamio, Vice-Comitis Sancti Albani Sacrum (1626) containing 32 Latin verses cryptically conveying Bacon is Shakespeare In the months following the death of Francis Bacon to the world his trusted Rosicrucian Brother Dr William Rawley gathered together and published a commemorative work in his honour entitled Memoriae honoratissimi Domini Francisci, Baronis de Verulamio, vice-comitis Sancti Albani sacrum, otheriwse known as the Manes Verulamiani. This rare volume contains thirty-two Latin verses in praise of Bacon which his orthodox biographers and editors have simply passed over, ignored, or suppressed, that portray Bacon as a secret supreme poet and dramatist, writer of comedies and tragedies, under the pseudonym of Shakespeare. The Church of England clergymen Dr William Rawley knew the truth and secrets of the concealed and hidden life of whom the world and posterity know as Francis Bacon. On 22 January 1600 the twelve-year-old William Rawley was admitted bible-clerk of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge where he graduated BA in 1605 and MA in 1608 and was made elector tutor on 19 March 1610. He took his holy orders in April 1611 and in December 1612 he was instituted by the university to the rectory of St Michael’s in Bowthorpe, Norfolk. He was soon after introduced to Lord Bacon whose influence resulted in Corpus Christi College bestowing on Rawley the rectory of Landbeach in 1616. By this time Dr Rawley was already chaplain and ‘Amanuensis, or dayly instrument’ to Bacon assisting him, as he tells us, ‘in the composing, of his Works, for many years together; Especially, in his writing Time; I conceived, that no Man, could pretend a better Interest, or Claim, to the ordering of them, after his Death, then my self.’ He lived with Bacon for the last ten years of his known life (1616-26) and was one of his good pens residing at Gorhambury with the poet and dramatist Ben Jonson when the Shakespeare First Folio was working its way through the Jaggard family printing presses. In the final elegy Bacon’s inward friend, the poet and dramatist Thomas Randolph, one of the sons of Ben Jonson, refers to Bacon as Quirinus, strikingly pointing to the fact that Bacon is our secret supreme poet and dramatist, Shakespeare: See! how plentiful the flood! I acknowledge these for genuine Muses and their tears. One Helicon will scarce equal them; Parnassus, not covered by Deucalion’s flood, will, wonderful to say, be hidden beneath these waters...When he perceived that the arts were held by no roots, and like seed scattered on the surface of the soil were withering away, he taught the Pegasean arts to grow, as grew the spear of Quirinus [Spear/Spearman; i.e., Shakespeare] swiftly into a laurel tree. Therefore since he has taught the Heliconian goddesses to flourish no lapse of ages shall dim his glory. The ardour of his noble heart could bear no longer that you, divine Minerva [Pallas Athena the Shaker of the Spear who wore a helmet which rendered her invisible], should be despised. His godlike pen restored your wonted honour and as another Apollo [leader of the Nine Muses presiding over the different kinds of poetry and liberal arts] dispelled the clouds that hid you. Thomas Randolph, Trinity College. PAPER: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument VIDEO: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc 1 MIN TRAILER VIDEO: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE
    4 points
  19. SIX PRIMARY DOCUMENTS CONFIRMING FRANCIS BACON IS SHAKESPEARE 5] THE 1623 SHAKESPEARE FIRST FOLIO On 8 November 1623 Edward Blount and Isaac Jaggard entered on the Stationers’ Register sixteen Shakespeare plays which had not been previously published. Another twenty previously published plays were added giving a total of thirty-six plays in the First Folio therein divided into Comedies, Histories and Tragedies, in an enormous volume of more than nine hundred pages, representing the greatest secular publication in the history of English literature, whose untold impact around the world over the last four hundred year has never been fully understood and thus never fully told. On its 400th anniversary a recent work entitled The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: A Baconian-Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Illusion uncovers and reveals unknown and untold secrets about the greatest work of literature in the history of humankind. For the first time, it brings forth the hidden connections of its author Francis Bacon and his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood with all the key members involved in its production, printing, and publication. His hidden relationships with its printers William and Isaac Jaggard, and the other members of the First Folio consortium, John Smethwick, William Aspley, and its publisher Edward Blount. It is almost universally unknown that its dedicatee William Herbert, Earl of Pembroke was at the time of its dedication Grand Master of England, one of half of the ‘Incomparable Paire Of Brethren’, with his brother Philip Herbert, Earl of Montgomery, whose joint open and hidden relationships with Bacon went back decades. The other critical member in the production of the 1623 First Folio was its editor and contributor of its two verses Ben Jonson who at the time the First Folio was making its way through the Jaggard printing presses was living with Bacon at Gorhambury, where he was at the heart of the secret plans for bringing together this vast and complex enterprise. The Droeshout engraving on the title page of the most famous secular work in English history is iconic and recognised the world over as the contemporary face of William Shakespeare the greatest poet and dramatist of all time. In strikingly marked contrast virtually nothing is known about Martin Droeshout the draughtsman responsible for the most recognisable literary image since time immemorial. A remarkable level of secrecy still surrounds his private life, friends and the social and professional circles he moved in, even though he self-evidently knew some of the most important figures in Jacobean England and moved in the highest circles of his times. This man who for the first thirty-three years of his life lived in the heart of London has scarcely left any documentary trace of his existence akin to him having been deliberately expunged from the records. To the present day his whole life is completely shrouded in secrecy and mystery. The key reason is Martin Droeshout and the famous/infamous Droeshout engraving on the title page of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio is a mask behind which its concealed author Francis Bacon is hidden in plain sight, which when lifted reveals the truth behind the Rosicrucian-Freemasonic illusion and ludibrium that the semi-illiterate William Shakspere of Stratford was the author of the greatest literature in the history of the world, that at a single devastating stroke brings the whole Stratfordian fiction crashing to the ground. For the first time The 1623 Shakespeare First Folio: A Baconian Rosicrucian-Freemasonic Illusion conveys an explosive secret in making known the concealed and hidden relationship between Francis Bacon and Martin Droeshout which has been suppressed for the last four hundred years. Their secret relationship is encapsulated in an earlier Droeshout engraving titled Doctor Panurgus (c. 1621) wherein one of its central figures is a depiction of Francis Bacon replete with a series of clues and indicators to confirm it. The figure of Bacon in the Dr Panurgus engraving by Droeshout dating from the early 1620s is drawn from the life, that points to Bacon sitting for it at Gorhambury. The complex engraving has clearly been very carefully planned out and must have involved Bacon giving Droeshout instructions and further directions that over a period of time necessitated numerous revision and amendments, not unlike the Droeshout in the First Folio, which exists in three known states, showing close attention to minor details as well as slight changes made to various aspects of it. This process was all taking place around the time Bacon was planning and preparing his Shakespeare plays for the Jaggard printing house during the years 1621 to 1623 when it is likely that Droeshout made numerous visits to see Bacon at his country estate at Gorhambury where he was most likely residing for periods with Bacon and Ben Jonson as part of his entourage of good pens and other artists that made up his literary workshop. It also lifts the veil of secrecy surrounding the hitherto unknown relationships between Francis Bacon and the other little-known figures Hugh Holland, James Mabbe and Leonard Digges who contributed verses to the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio. Particularly, Bacon’s relationship with Leonard Digges, whose own father Sir Nicholas Bacon was the special patron of his grandfather and father Leonard Digges and Thomas Digges, the poet whose verse prefixed to the Folio refers to the Stratford Monument, which is adorned with Rosicrucian-Freemasonic symbols and Baconian ciphers, secretly commissioned by Francis Bacon and his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood. In addition to all the above cryptic devices secretly inserted by Bacon in the Shakespeare First Folio there are also many remarkable and astonishing references and allusions to himself and members of the Bacon family, which for four hundred years have remained unfamiliar or unknown to the ordinary schoolmen, the casual student, and effectively the rest of the world. These include references and allusions to himself in several different plays where the character is in some instances named Francis and similarly where characters are named after his three brothers Sir Nicholas Bacon, Sir Nathaniel Bacon, and Anthony Bacon. Similarly in the First Folio there are references and allusions to his father and mother Sir Nicholas and Lady Anne Cooke Bacon, her three sisters Lady Katherine Cooke Killigrew, Lady Elizabeth Cooke Hoby Russell and her husband John, Lord Russell, Lady Mildred Cooke Cecil and her husband William Cecil, Lord Burghley, as well as their offspring (Bacon’s cousins) Thomas Posthumous Hoby and Sir Robert Cecil, and the son of their brother William Cooke, named after his father, Bacon’s other cousin, known as William Cooke of Highnam Court in Gloucester. PAPER: https://www.academia.edu/103102421/The_1623_Shakespeare_First_Folio_A_Baconian_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Illusion VIDEO: https://youtu.be/v1KM77xaUbs 1 MIN TRAILER VIDEO: https://youtu.be/zJep0FC7xU4
    4 points
  20. SIX PRIMARY DOCUMENTS CONFIRMING FRANCIS BACON IS SHAKESPEARE 4] THE SO-CALLED ‘DERING’ MANUSCRIPT OF HENRY IV THE UNIQUE AND EARLIEST KNOWN SHAKESPEARE MANUSCRIPT (c. 1596) ORIGINATING FROM BACON’S LITERARY WORKSHOP AND CORRECTED IN HIS OWN HAND It is little known to virtually all Shakespeare scholars, the ordinary schoolmen, and the rest of the world that there exists an early manuscript version of the play Henry IV. This manuscript is the earliest extant manuscript of a Shakespeare play ever discovered. This manuscript was discovered in 1844 preserved in the collection of the eighth Baronet Sir Edward Dering (1807-96) at Surrenden Hall near Pluckley in Kent. It had previously formed part of the library of the first Sir Edward Dering (1598-1644), an antiquarian with an interest in literature and drama, named after his uncle the Puritan preacher Edward Dering patronised by the Cooke sisters Lady Anne Cooke Bacon, Lady Elizabeth Cooke Hoby Russell, Lady Mildred Cooke Cecil and Lady Cooke Killigrew. The relatively obscure Sir Edward Dering (1598-1644) about whose early life very little is known was-here revealed for the first time-a close friend and relative (twice over) of the author of Henry IV Francis Bacon. The so-called Dering manuscript is a single-five act Shakespeare play of Henry IV and is earlier than the first printed quarto of The Historie of Henrie the fourth issued in 1598 and the quarto edition of The Second part of Henrie the fourth printed in 1600. The MS represents the play as Bacon originally composed it when it was one play and not two before developing his original version into two separate parts. Furthermore, we can be reasonably precise regarding the date of the manuscript. It is widely agreed Henry IV followed closely upon Richard II as not only is Henry IV next chronologically its predecessor Richard II clearly points to a sequel. The earlier Richard II is believed to date to around late 1595 or early 1596, and Henry IV was probably composed shortly after, sometime in 1596. The so-called corrector’s hand in the so-called Dering manuscript is Bacon’s own cramped hand, as one would expect, from the author of the play. PAPER: https://www.academia.edu/85225460/Francis_Bacon_and_the_so_called_Dering_Manuscript_of_Henry_IV_the_Unique_and_Earliest_Known_Manuscript_of_a_Shakespeare_play_or_the_Holy_Grail_of_Shakespeare_Scholarship_a_Shakespeare_Manuscript_c_1596_Originating_from_Bacons_Literary_Workshop_and_Corrected_in_his_Hand VIDEO: https://youtu.be/-7nzkrGEKeI
    4 points
  21. SIX PRIMARY DOCUMENTS CONFIRMING FRANCIS BACON IS SHAKESPEARE 2] FRANCIS BACON’S OWN COLLECTION OF MSS KNOWN AS THE NORTHUMBERLAND MANUSCRIPT ORIGINALLY CONTAINING HIS TWO SHAKESPEARE PLAYS RICHARD II AND RICHARD III The Bacon collection of manuscripts hitherto known as The Northumberland Manuscript contains various writings by Bacon, comprising letters, essays, religio-political treatises, dramatic devices and originally held two of his Shakespeare plays Richard II and Richard III. All the evidence makes tolerably certain that no part of the manuscript was written after c.1596-7. The precise dating of the manuscript is not merely some historical curiosity. The precision of the date is of the most manifest importance for the very simple reason that in 1597 William Shakespeare was not publicly known as a dramatic author. The pseudonym first appeared on the 1598 quarto edition of Love’s Labour’s Lost the same year it appeared on the title pages of the quartos of Richard II and Richard III, most probably printed from the manuscripts that were originally part of this Bacon-Shakespeare Manuscript. In addition to originally having held two of Bacon’s Shakespeare plays Richard II and Richard III, the outer cover of his collection of manuscripts contains references and links to his narrative Shakespeare poem The Rape of Lucrece and another three of his Shakespeare plays Love’s Labour’s Lost, Romeo and Juliet & The Merchant of Venice. This is moreover the only manuscript where the names Bacon and Shakespeare appear together in a contemporary document. Various forms of his name Bacon and Francis Bacon and pseudonym Shakespeare and William Shakespeare are scribbled all over its outer cover on around twenty occasions. Above the entry for his Shakespeare play Richard II appears the entry ‘By Mr. ffrauncis William Shakespeare’, and further down the word ‘Your’ is twice written across his pseudonym William Shakespeare-so it reads ‘Your William Shakespeare’. As if to emphasise this entry a second occurrence of the name ‘ffrauncis’ is written upside down above the first ‘ffrauncis’ thus reading from left to right ‘ffrauncis William Shakespeare’. Below the entry for ‘Rychard the second’, and above the entry for ‘Rychard the third’, appears his name ‘ffrauncis’ and to the left ‘Bacon’ and the right ‘Shakespeare’. Below at the bottom of the outer cover his pseudonym ‘William Shakespeare’ is repeated numerous times, and as if to emphasise one more time Bacon is Shakespeare, we are met with the possessive entry ‘your William Shakespeare’. PAPER: https://www.academia.edu/91789871/The_Bacon_Shakespeare_Manuscript_Hitherto_known_as_the_Northumberland_Manuscript_which_originally_Contained_Copies_of_his_Shakespeare_Plays_Richard_II_and_Richard_III VIDEO PART 1: https://youtu.be/QDn8gdBqnIM VIDEO PART 2: https://youtu.be/DEHByFCuvgI 1 MIN TRAILER VIDEO: https://youtu.be/g3U9y-qedWc
    4 points
  22. https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/collex/exhibits/exsnb/ https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/ead/pdf/ex-bacon.pdf The Bacon collection, with its fine chronological series of manorial court and account rolls spanning four centuries, allows one to view the development of English rural and agricultural society in considerable detail. The real strength of the collection lies in the manorial documents relating to Redgrave and Hindercley in Suffolk, both manors in the large ecclesiastical estat4es of the Abbey of Bury St. Edmunds. The present exhibition also serves as the culmination of the efforts of two generations of Chicago scholars beginning with the initiative and foresight of Professors Charles R. Baskerfill, John M. Manly, and Edith Rickert.
    4 points
  23. Hi Christie, I have taken the above posts from my book The Fraudulent Friedmans: The Bacon Ciphers in the Shakespeare Works (2022), pp. 262-67 from the section on Acrostics and Anagrams. There is no entry for Puttenham in A. M. Challinor, An Index to Baconiana (The Francis Bacon Society, 2001). The are however four entries under The Arte of English Poesie (p. 80) for Baconiana 10 April 1905, pp. 95-103; Baconiana, 57 January 1917, pp. 48-55; Baconiana, 77 August 1930, pp. 200-1; Baconiana, 106 January 1943, pp. 38-41 (and correspodence). https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works Hope that helps. Phoenix.
    4 points
  24. FRANCIS BACON AND HIS ANONYMOUS AUTHORSHIP OF THE ARTE OF ENGLISH POETRIE AND HIS SHAKESPEARE POEMS AND PLAYS Shortly after Begley set forth Nova Resuscitatio or the Unveiling of his Concealed Works showing Bacon was the real author of The Arte of English Poesie another work appeared from the voluminous Shakespeare scholar William Lowes Rushton entitled Shakespeare and ‘The Arte Of English Poesie’ which he knows has been ‘attributed’ to George Puttenham. On its first page Rushton sets out his stall ‘Knowledge of this old book, with which Shakespeare was very familiar, has enabled me to illustrate many obscure passages and words and expressions of doubtful meaning. Shakespeare not only introduces in his Plays many of the Figures which Puttenham describes, but he also frequently uses the same words which appear in the examples Puttenham gives of the Figures.’1In substantiating the premise throughout his treatise Rushton places the figures and words in The Arte of English Poesie alongside the relevant passages in the Shakespeare poems and plays from the earliest through to the last plays in the cannon, illustrating the numerous unmistakable correspondences, resemblances and parallels between the two works evident in the poems: Venus and Adonis, The Rape of Lucrece, Sonnets, A Lover’s Complaint, The Passionate Pilgrim, and the comedies, histories and tragedies: The Taming of the Shrew, Two Gentlemen of Verona, 2 Henry VI, 3 Henry VI, Richard III, Comedy of Errors, Love’s Labour’s Lost, Richard II, Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Merry Wives of Windsor, 2 Henry IV, Much Ado About Nothing, Henry V, Julius Caesar, As You Like It, Hamlet, Twelfth Night, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, All’s Well That Ends Well, Timon of Athens, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, The Winter’s Tale, Cymbeline, The Tempest and Henry VIII. 1. William Lowes Rushton, Shakespeare And ‘The Arte Of English Poesie’ (Liverpool: Henry Young & Sons, 1908), p. 1.
    4 points
  25. Hi everyone, This morning, I woke up with the idea of a short video in mind. Here is the result. It derives from the work of J.C. (see Baconiana 1907) but my approach is different. I hope you will enjoy it. NOV1623.mp4
    4 points
  26. Thanks Eric and for my spelling error of Chanson. It must come from my living in France! I meant Chandos whose kinsman Duke Chandos was a distant grandfather X6 of mine. Agreed that both sitter and paiinter are unkown.
    4 points
  27. Hi Eric, I remember when I first read Dodd's Francis Bacon's Personal Life Story at a time when I knew nothing about FB. At some point he mentioned that FB secretly wrote the Shakespeare works. I laughed out loud and thought there is no way that could possibly be true. I mean, I reasoned with myself, if that was the case all the professors and universities around the world would be singing it from the rooftops. Talk about being innocent and naive! When I realized the full Baconian Truth it was a revelation that profoundly changed my own cerebral world and the future direction of my life.
    4 points
  28. The book I linked to elsewhere - this one is invaluable. Definitely worth a read.
    4 points
  29. US INTELLIGENCE IS PRIVY TO THE SECRET THAT FRANCIS BACON IS SHAKESPEARE The first volume is divided into six sections under the heading ‘Volume One: Codes and Ciphers prior to World War 1’ with each section divided into a varying number of sub-sections. The first section examines and discusses the code and cipher systems of ‘The American Systems in the Revolutionary Period’ a pattern repeated for ‘The British Systems in the Revolution’; ‘The Federal Systems in the Civil War’; ‘The Confederate Systems in the Civil War’; ‘A Diplomatic System in the Civil War Period’; and ‘Cryptographic Progress 1865-1917’. In the second volume of the work Professor Richards devotes six pages to a discussion of the ‘Riverbank Laboratories’. In its brief preceding chapter ‘The Founding of the Cipher Bureau’ leading up to the Riverbank Laboratories Professor Richards states ‘The entry of the United States into World War 1 on 6 April 1917 found the army ill-prepared both cryptographically and cryptanalytically to meet the great demands which immediately faced it.’1 The great responsibility for forming an organization to meet the pressing requirements of the War Department for the solution of intercepted cryptographic material fell to Major Van Deman, who later acquired the accolade ‘Father of Military Intelligence’.2 On entering the war the US was ill-prepared and the War Department ‘was forced to rely for cryptanalytic assistance at least for a time, on the volunteer efforts of a group of patriotic civilians. The fact that a major war had already been raging in Europe for nearly three years had apparently not much accelerated military preparations: Indeed, the policies of the Administration prior to 1917 had been based on strict neutrality, a view which in those days evidently pervaded the War Department as well as public opinion’3 In the following section ‘The Riverbank Laboratories’ Professor Richards explains that to remedy the situation an offer was received from ‘an institution known as Riverbank Laboratories’, staffed with scholars and scientists engaged in genetics and cryptography. 1. Theodore W. Richards, Historical Background of the Signal Security Agency (Army Security Agency, Washington DC, 1946), II, p. 1. 2. Ibid., II, p. 2. 3. Ibid., pp. 2-3. Paper: https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/ a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.
    4 points
  30. AN EARLY ENGLISH WORK ON SECRET WRITING 1588 https://ia801307.us.archive.org/9/items/b20457224/b20457224.pdf Paper: https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/ a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.
    4 points
  31. THE TITLE PAGE THE 1605 ADVANCEMENT OF LEARNING ANNOTATED WITH A CIPHER IN A CONTEMPORARY HAND FROM PRINCETON UNIVERSITY LIBRARY Paper: https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/ a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.
    4 points
  32. Hi Hen. W, Welcome to B'Hive and thank you for all your contributions. Peace and Love. The Phoenixes.
    4 points
  33. I'm tickled pink by how zefty my Exhibits Page is looking now at New Gorhambury: https://gorhambury.org/public/exhibits/
    4 points
  34. Related link: https://www.lib.uchicago.edu/e/spcl/findaid/bacon/15.php
    4 points
  35. BACONIAN CIPHERS & FRENCH INTELLIGENCE From before the turn of the twentieth century there had been a growing consensus among German, and to a lesser extent, Dutch academics that Bacon was in fact the secret author of the Shakespeare works. The endorsement of Gallup’s decipherments by General Cartier had the striking effect of vigorously renewing the debate in post war France. Opinion, as it had been in Germany and Holland was divided, with opposing views warmly expressed in numerous articles, some it has to be said more scholarly than others. General Cartier's endorsement of the bi-literal cipher was also not to go unnoticed in the close knit world of cryptology. Two years after his series of articles two French army officers Andre Lange and E. A. Soudart the ‘Former heads of the Cipher Bureau at General Headquarters’, published in French a Treatise on Cryptology. The historical treatise is listed by Professor Galland in An Historical and Analytical Bibliography of the Literature Of Cryptography: This excellent general text on cryptography gives considerable information concerning the history of cryptography, theories of ciphering, examples and methods of deciphering codes, and a bibliographical list of about 100 items, pp. iii-xv. It is one of the best of modern French works on the subject.1 1. Joseph S. Galland, An Historical and Analytical Bibliography of the Literature of Cryptology (Evanston, Northwestern University, 1945), p. 108. Paper: https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/ a unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.
    4 points
  36. Hi A Phoenix Your impeccable research is full of interesting and surprising information. E.g. Cartier's conclusions. As usual, brilliant!
    4 points
  37. Beware the tides of March. During the last 2 weeks of March attendance has doubled for each day. Sirbacon.org exceeded over 10,000 visitors worldwide for the month of March, mostly new visitors landing on all subject manner. Outside of our Forum clicks, pages that have to do with Bacon's "The Four Idols" and the King James Bible leads the way which indicate school related interests. We are Everywhere!
    4 points
  38. RE: "SPEAR-SHAKER" THE MOVIE / MINI SERIES The personal and political crisis of the so-called Essex Rebellion would provide a ready-made 'episode' in a movie about the (real) life of Lord Bacon. Peter Dawkins' essay https://www.fbrt.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Francis_Bacon_Shakespeare__the_Earl_of_Essex.pdf could be adapted as a script - at least, that's how I read it.
    4 points
  39. Many thanks to Joy Hancox for having brought to light this incredible painting and having shared with us some of her research.🙏❤️ This a great Story for Easter ! Here are some ideas ... The "shuttle" in the middle reminds me the episode of Christ sleeping during The Tempest. https://www.kingjamesbibleonline.org/jesus-calms-the-storm-at-sea_bible/ I wonder if it could also hide a reference to Jacob's dream. And I think that Francis Bacon could be, in fact, the first Horseman, the one riding the white horse ... Apocalypse 6 : 2 "And I saw, and behold a white horse: and he that sat on him had a bow; and a crown was given unto him: and he went forth conquering, and to conquer." The crown shall be hidden under his Hat 🙂 https://archive.org/details/minervabritannao00peac/page/171/mode/2up Apocalypse 19 : 11 11. And I saw heaven opened, and behold a white horse; and he that sat upon him was called Faithful and True, and in righteousness he doth judge and make war.
    4 points
  40. THE BACON BI-LITERAL CIPHER, ELIZABETH WELLS GALLUP AND US INTELLIGENCE The fourteen page pamphlet The Greatest Work of Sir Francis Bacon published by the Riverbank Laboratories written by Captain J. A. Powell is of a great deal of interest. This work gives rise to a series of subtle deceptions perpetrated by the Friedmans designed to withhold important information about its author and his undoubted expertise in the area of codes and ciphers in general and the Baconian Bi-literal Cipher in particular. The Friedmans were very familiar with J. A. Powell from their days at Riverbank and in The Shakespearean Ciphers Examined they twice quote from the above work but only once mention his name in the text as follows ‘J. A. Powell says of this stage’.1 The same quote used in the book is also found in their manuscript on which it is based ‘The Cryptologist Looks at Shakespeare’: As one observer remarked, the cipher “came with the same effect as does a bright light to one who has lost his way in the dark night.” [Powell, J. A. The greatest work of Sir Francis Bacon. Geneva Illinois: The Riverbank Laboratories, 1916, pp. 14]. 2 In an unpublished manuscript of a lecture given by W. F. Friedman ‘A Cryptographer Looks at Literature’, he artfully employs a deceitful rhetorical device beloved by the fraudulent Friedmans, ‘To be perfectly fair’, when just about to consciously withhold information and deliberately deceive and mislead his listening audience: To be perfectly fair, I must quote what one of Mrs. Gallup’s defenders (Powell, 1916), say on this point of the difficulty in classifying the letters.3 So why did the Friedmans in three of their published and unpublished writings want to withhold information concerning J. A. Powell, an individual about whom of course they knew their ordinary readers would have no idea who he was, or anything of his background, experience and expertise, in the art and science of codes and ciphers? 1. William F. Friedman and Elizebeth S. Friedman, The Shakespearean Ciphers Examined An Analysis Of Cryptographic Systems Used As Evidence That Some Other Author Than William Shakespeare Wrote The Plays Commonly Attributed To Him (Cambridge University Press, 1958), p. 191, see also, p. 190n1. 2. William F. Friedman and Elizebeth S. Friedman., ‘The Cryptologist Looks At Shakespeare’, Unpublished Typescript MS. Add. 215, Folger Shakespeare Library, 1955, p. 133. 3. William Friedman, ‘A Cryptographer Looks at Literature’, (William Friedman Collection, George C Marshall Research Library, Lexington, Virginia, n.d.), p. 24. Paper: https://www.academia.edu/81465877/The_Fraudulent_Friedmans_The_Bacon_Ciphers_in_the_Shakespeare_Works Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fc2ErlSmmjI&t=9s For all the Riverbank Publications please see https://gorhambury.org/ a very unique website with its stated purpose: To use technology in a novel way to expose the secret writings of Sir Francis to the world, presenting visualizations in such a way as to eliminate any possible doubt about Validity.
    4 points
  41. Just found this. Robert Anton Wilson was a most interesting personality and prolific writer living in Berkeley CA when I first met him in 1975. We were not college roommates but maybe in a parallel universe next door. Wilson was writing books and offering Exo-Psychology courses which I participated in. I shared with him some info which he used in his soon to be published book, "Cosmic Trigger."
    4 points
  42. QUEEN ELIZABETH, THE PREGNANCY PORTRAIT & THE CONCEALED ROYAL BIRTH OF FRANCIS BACON The figure of Queen Elizabeth in her Persian robe is standing beneath a walnut tree, known as a Persian walnut which in Elizabethan times was referred to as a Royal tree. The Royal walnut tree is a symbol of knowledge and wisdom (the subjects of Bacon’s Advancement of Learning and Wisdom of the Ancients). On the branches of the tree Strong points out that at the top to the right there are two small birds with peachy pink breasts, namely chaffinches which David Shakespeare thinks may signify two young men.1 With photographic enhancement David Shakespeare also identified a songbird perched on a branch, signifying a songbird in a sole Arabian tree, that is of some very special importance. In 1601 (for some about the date of the portrait) a long allegorical poem was set forth by a little known Robert Chester entitled Love’s Martyr, with a collection of shorter poems by other poets, including the Shakespeare poem known as The Phoenix and Turtle:2 Let the bird of loudest lay On the sole Arabian tree Herald sad and trumpet be, To whose sound chaste wings obey. [Lines 1-4] The 67 line (67=Francis in simple cipher) allegorical Shakespeare poem tells the story of a mystical love between two birds-the turtle a symbol of fidelity and the mythical phoenix emblem of immortality. The poem mourns the death of the phoenix and turtle and its theme of the mutual flame explores the complexity of the mystical union of the two dead birds. It is the most obscure of the Shakespeare poems and as Hackett argues it ‘incites deciphering’ with many attempting to decode the allegory via references to historical figures.3 The phoenix is usually interpreted to represent Queen Elizabeth and numerous scholars believe the poem obliquely alludes to the relationship between Elizabeth and her lover the Earl of Essex (he was not her lover but her concealed son), or if not to their relationship, to the events that lie behind the Essex rebellion and his execution in 1601. Or alternatively, the turtle may partly shadow Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester with whom Queen Elizabeth had two sons. Some Shakespeare scholars have interpreted the child of the phoenix as a reference to Elizabeth’s heir James VI of Scotland, which of course, is clearly problematic (and wrong), as she was alive in 1601. In the poem the phoenix simultaneously represents Queen Elizabeth, as well as her heir and successor. And in the Threnos its author Bacon laments that she leaves no open posterity, meaning himself her concealed child, and unacknowledged heir to the throne of England: Beauty, truth, and rarity, Grace in all simplicity, Here enclosed in cinders lie. Death is now the phoenix’ nest, And the turtle’s loyal breast To eternity does rest. Leaving no posterity ‘Twas not their infirmity, It was married chastity. [Lines 53-61] 1. Roy Strong, ‘“My Weepinge Stagg I Crowne”: The Persian Lady Reconsidered’ In The Art of The Emblem, eds., Michael Bath, John Manning and Alan R. Young (New York: AMS Press, Inc, 1993), p. 115; David Shakespeare, ‘The Pregnancy Portrait of Elizabeth I’, (First edition May, 2018, online), p. 87. 2. David Shakespeare, ‘The Pregnancy Portrait of Elizabeth I’, (First edition May, 2018, online), pp. 38-40. 3. Helen Hackett, Shakespeare and Elizabeth: The Meeting Of Two Myths (Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2009), p. 137.
    4 points
  43. M D L X I I I Someone designed and typeset this book by Giambattista Della Porta with great care and panache.
    4 points
  44. Della Porta, Giovan Battista - HISTORY OF CAMPANIA.pdf (Weirdly, this Google translation is in present tense.)
    4 points
  45. DELLA PORTA, FRANCIS BACON AND SHAKESPEARE In 1591 there appeared in London a Latin edition of a milestone work on cryptology by the Italian polymath and playwright Giambattista della Porta entitled De Fvtivis Literarvm Notis printed by John Wolfe with whom Bacon and his uncle Sir William Cecil, Lord Burghley had a secret clandestine relationship.1 This is a reprint of the work that originally appeared with the same title at Naples in 1563.2 It is divided into four books: Book 1 deals with ancient ciphers; Book II gives 180 modern ciphers; Book III is a treatise on cryptanalysis or deciphering; Book IV provides linguistical tables of syllables and words to help cryptographic solution, and in it appeared ‘the first diagraphic cipher in cryptology, in which two letters were represented by a single symbol.’3 This rare book, observes Kahn, ‘encompassed the cryptologic knowledge of the time’,4 and for Dr Mendelson its author Porta ‘was, in my opinion, the outstanding cryptographer of the Renaissance. Some unknown who worked in a hidden room behind closed doors may possibly have surpassed him in a general grasp of the subject, but among those whose work can be studied he towers like a giant.’5 It is undoubtedly a very important landmark work in the history of cryptology which makes it all the more remarkable that the Fraudulent Friedmans only once referred to Porta in The Shakespeare Ciphers Examined delivered with a fishing metaphor that smelt to the high heavens, which I here quote in full: ...the numerologists have spread their nets wider than this. Among the odd fish they [the Baconians] have caught are the sixteenth-century Italian cryptographer Ioan Baptiste Porta, numerous seventeenth-century authors, and Elizabethan writers in shoals.6 The De Furtivis Literarum Notis has an interesting and revelatory history involving the printer John Wolfe assisted by Petruccio Ubaldini who worked closely with Bacon and his uncle Sir William Cecil, first revealed by W. T. Smedley more than century ago in an edition of Baconiana in 1910: In 1591 John Wolf re-published Baptista Porta’s work on cyphers, published by Ioa Maria Scotus in Naples in 1563, but according to Spedding not en vente until 1568. This reprint was dedicated to Henry Percy, Earl of Northumberland. After the edition had been printed off, the title-page was altered to correspond with the 1563 publication, the dedication was taken out and a copy of the original dedication was substituted, and over this was placed the AA headpiece. Then an edition was struck off which until to-day has been sold and re-sold as the first edition of Baptista’s work.7 Smedley owned a copy of each of the original genuine 1563 edition of De Furtivis Literarum Notis, the falsely dated edition published by Wolfe made to look like the original 1563 edition with a Baconian-Rosicrucian AA headpiece over the dedication page, and the 1591 edition of De Furtivis Literarum Notis republished by Wolfe with a dedication to Henry Percy, Earl of Northumberland: The false-dated copy is annotated throughout in Francis Bacon’s handwriting. As was his invariable custom he went through the errata, altered each one, and as he did so ticked off the schedule [and] when I opened the 1591 copy I was surprised to find there also Bacon’s handwriting.8 1. Giambattista della Porta, De Fvrtivis Literarvm Notis Vvlgo. De Ziferis Libri IIII (Londini: Apud Johannem Wolphium. 1591); Denis B. Woodfield, Surreptitious Printing in England 1550-1640 (New York: Bibliographical Society of America, 1973), pp. 5-18, 24-33, 164-70; A. Phoenix, ‘An Unrecognised Francis Bacon Manuscript Written In The Hand Of The Bacon Family Scribe Petruccio Ubaldini, The Model For Petruccio In The Taming Of The Shrew, Whose Father In The Play Is Antonio, And Where Two Of His Household Servants Are Named Nicholas And Nathaniel, The Christian Names Of Anthony, Nicholas And Nathaniel Bacon’, pp. 44-48 notes 61-64. 2. Giambattista della Porta, De Fvrtivis Literarvm Notis Vvlgo. De Ziferis Libri IIII (Neapoli: Apud Ioa. Mariam Scotum, 1563). 3. Joseph S. Galland, An Historical And Analytical Bibliography Of The Literature of Cryptology (Evanston: Northwestern University, 1945), pp. 147; David Kahn, The Codebreakers The Story of Secret Writing (New York: Scribner, 1967, 1996), pp. 138-9; David Newton, Encyclopedia Of Cryptology (Oxford: ABC-CLIO, 1998), p. 220. 4. David Kahn, The Codebreakers The Story of Secret Writing (New York: Scribner, 1967, 1996), p. 138. 5. Charles J. Mendelsohn, ‘Blaise de Vigenère and the “Chiffre Carre”’, American Philosophical Society, Vol. 82, 1940, p. 113; David Kahn, The Codebreakers The Story of Secret Writing (New York: Scribner, 1967, 1996), p. 143. 6. William F. Friedman and Elizebeth S. Friedman, The Shakespearean Ciphers Examined An Analysis Of Cryptographic Systems Used As Evidence That Some Other Author Than William Shakespeare Wrote The Plays Commonly Attributed To Him (Cambridge University Press, 1958), p. 181. 7. William T. Smedley, ‘A False-Dated Book’, in Baconiana, Vol. VIII, Third Series, Oct 1910, pp. 187-8; William T. Smedley, The Mystery Of Francis Bacon (London: Robert Banks & Son, 1912), p. 134. Both Shulman and Kahn inform their readers that the 1591 edition is pirated but do not mention Smedley and the connection to it of Bacon, see David Shulman, An Annotated Bibliography of Cryptography (New York & London, Garland Publishing, Inc., 1976), p. 4 and David Kahn, The Codebreakers The Story of Secret Writing (New York: Scribner, 1967, 1996), p. 142/1014. Whereas Galland refers to Smedley’s article in the Baconiana but fails to mention Bacon or the handwriting of Bacon, see Joseph S. Galland, An Historical And Analytical Bibliography Of The Literature of Cryptology (Evanston: Northwestern University, 1945), pp. 147. STC 20118a. 8. William T. Smedley, ‘A False-Dated Book’, Baconiana, Vol. VIII, Third Series Oct 1910, pp. 187-88n.
    4 points
  46. Good one Eric : "There's more to this than meets the eye." LOL! The essence of Jean Overton Fuller's research on Bacon's eye color https://sirbacon.org/downloads/fuller-chapter2.pdf
    4 points
  47. Hi Jon Thanks for your timely mention of the colour of FB's eyes and hair. I know that this subject has been raised here in the past, but as Julie and I are wrapping up the Francis Bacon genealogy project at the moment, his true parentage is very much front of mind. Please forgive me if I disagree with some of your remarks. This is only as I see it... Francis didn't have red hair. It was described and depicted in paintings as being auburn. Neither did he or his parents, Elizabeth and Robert, have blue eyes, despite some of Hilliard's portraits which would seem to indicate that the contrary was true. And according to google, it is not the case that red haired people always have green or blue eyes. 83 % of redheads have Brown eyes, followed by Brown /green hazel then Green/Brown hazel, then brown/blue hazel then grey , green/blue hazel then blue then Green. But forget all that. You raise such an important question. The artist, Nicholas Hilliard, Francis Bacon's travelling companion between 1576-79, clearly painted the young Francis with blue eyes. There is no getting around this fact, even though every other portrait depicts him with brown-coloured eyes. How do we explain this anomaly? You will recall the dire circumstances under which Francis left England as a novice attaché for France. His life depended on the utmost secrecy concerning his royal ancestry. Could it have been that, as a self-protective measure, Francis instructed Hilliard to change the colour of his eyes to match those of his foster parents, Lord and Lady Bacon? Or, was it simply artistic licence on the part of Hilliard? It is the case that he painted miniatures of Dudley and Elizabeth with strange, almost colourless eyes. It is easy to see how it could be assumed that Francis, Dudley and QEI all had blue eyes from looking at Hilliard's portraits. The issue of FB's eye colour and heredity was raised by Jean Overton Fuller. If you haven't come across it yet, you might find Lawrence Gerald's interview with her of some interest. https://sirbacon.org/fullerinterview.htm Peter Dawkins had this to say about Francis's truly remarkable baby portrait: In this portrait the child, Francis, is pictured holding an apple in his right hand, whilst holding his left hand over his heart. No detail of good Renaissance painting was without an intended symbolic meaning, particularly those pictures commissioned or executed by the learned progenitors of the English Renaissance and Reformation. The apple is an age old symbol of the fruit of knowledge, and in this early portrait of Francis is prophecied Francis' later words and actions, " I have taken all knowledge for my province." This is his field of action, signified by his right hand, but balanced by his left hand on his heart, charitable and useful. This sums up the whole motivation and life of this great soul, and it can even be sensed in his face as portrayed here, with his rich dark brown eyes or hazel eyes, like those of his brother, Essex, his mother, Queen Elizabeth, his father, Earl of Leicester, and his grandmother, Anne Boleyn. (The Bacon family inherited predominantly grey-blue coloured eyes. See Jean Overton Fuller's Sir Francis Bacon, A Biography, for a discussion of this.) https://sirbacon.org/links/childbacon.htm Here is a portrait of Elizabeth I by Nicholas Hilliard with brown eyes. How can an infant's eyes change from brown to blue by the time that child reaches young adulthood? Something odd is going on here, like we are only seeing the tip of the iceberg. There's more to this than meets the eye. Thank you for bring this mystery to our attention once again.
    4 points
  48. Henry IV, Part 1 may be the richest play of them all for easy ciphers. Its a great Bacon Cipher 101 textbook. 🙂 1622: http://www.rarebookroom.org/Control/shahet/index.html (Spread 6) 1623: https://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/bookplay/Bran_F1/1h4/index.html
    4 points
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