Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/02/2022 in all areas

  1. Bees were a Royal symbol as far back as Egypt and represent the King. The French Merovingian Dynasty adopted the Bee as one of their symbols possibly in allusion to their Canaanite heritage and Royal descent. The bee was also adopted by Napoleon who perceived himself as descended from Merovingians, he had them sewn onto his cloak. It may be an allusion by Sir Francis Bacon to his own Royal Heritage (son of Queen EiR)……? Anyway I’m very pleased to be buzzing around with you guys.
    5 points
  2. Hi A phoenix, Thank you so much for sharing with us regularly those great Quotes about Bacon ! I do not know most of them, so I really enjoy to discover and read your posts each day !❤️ Bacon , "Prince of Imagination ... High Priest of Truth ... Sole Priest of the World and Human Souls."... simply beautiful !
    5 points
  3. An international talk-fest about the illiterate son of butcher-cum-glove maker!
    5 points
  4. Francis Bacon Wrote Works Anonymously and Behind a Range of Pseudonyms
    4 points
  5. 4 points
  6. I. I AM the Concealed Poet, And I shall do your story right; Your bones will sing until they fail And break upon the floor of night. You fester in the dark of day, And by the moon you do not dream; But now, in verse, you speak again And clear the cancer on your name. The name that now has lost its grace Will once again be known to praise; Your song will echo through the halls, And set so many hearts ablaze. The mansion, then, will come alive, Those empty rooms will sing at last; The symbols that were lost within Will link our present to your past. II. YOU KNEW at once, before you saw, You knew the spark was going soon – And when he spoke, he spoke like ash, Like gravel, in the nightly noon. And when he told you that he hurt, He said he would not last the day; And when the doctors left the room, You did not even cry or pray. And so, you waited by the bed. The ocean air went in and out, The curtains billowed in the room, And cast their shadows all about, You did not speak, or even dream; You simply stood and waited there. The world whispered round the bed And shifted in the ocean’s glare. You sometimes spoke, he sometimes heard, And sometimes, he would simply drift; The minutes passed, and then the hours – Still, he lay there, never stiff. And when the noon had turned to day, You felt the ocean’s silver gleam; But there were waters by the shore That melted like a dying dream. So, as the ocean sang and turned, And as the waters lapped the land And as the seabirds swooped about, And made confessions to the sand, Two people waited in a room, Allowed one final, soulless day, One day of curtains and white sheets, And talk to waste the time away. So soon the ocean turned to red And melted with the ending sun, The stars became the eyes of night, And speared the day as it was done. You knew that it was near the time, You knew so well, and so did he; For in each clouded breath there was A sample of eternity You lit the lamps inside the room, You drew the curtains and the drapes; And as the minutes ticked away, The walls went mad with flickering shapes. You felt his touch upon your hand, And knew he would not see the dawn. You shared with him one last embrace, And then, in moments, he was gone. His death was quick, the doctors said, As say the doctors everywhere; By then the lamplight in the room Had weakened to a bitter glare. They took their notes and did their jobs; You watched them in the crippled light; They closed his eyes, as doctors do, And bore him off into the night. You sat there, in the empty room, Until the dawn erased the sky; Until the moon had disappeared And water birds were made to fly. You watched the foam appear and fall, To vanish in the wicked tide So, as the ocean sang and turned, You sat there in the room and cried.
    4 points
  7. Welcome back Rob ! It is great to hear from you ! ❤️
    4 points
  8. Even a "Tempest" is not enough to stop Light-of-Truth from working on the Sonnets!
    4 points
  9. 4 points
  10. Hi Eric, emailed Rob yesterday and he replied that he and his wife Theresa were thankfully safe and well. At the moment they have no power and were thinking about checking into a hotel. If we hear anything more we will keep you and our fellow B'Hivers updated.
    4 points
  11. 4 points
  12. Francis Bacon - Incomparable Wisdom and Heroical Virtue
    4 points
  13. Francis Bacon - Heir of all Eternity
    4 points
  14. Too marvellous for words. Francis Tudor's pen has become a chisel carving his own epitaph in stone!
    4 points
  15. I tried to google Mattias Leius but all I could find were foreign language sites. Thank you A.P. for this rare find!
    4 points
  16. After "to be or not to be" and "wherefore art thou, Romeo?", this is perhaps the next most famous speech from the plays. Thanks to A.P., I begin to see why. It may be the most perfectly crafted and uplifting rallying cry ever written. The repetition of the word "we" in the first line; the combination of blood and brotherhood; the contrast between the rest of the English population "now abed" with "manhood" and the "us" in the last line - such elegant simplicity. The speech is devoid of aggression and bloodthirstiness, yet it is the model of patriotism in the face of war, unlike Churchill's famous battle cry, "we'll fight them on the beaches..." etc.
    4 points
  17. Francis Bacon Benefactor of the Kingdom
    4 points
  18. 4 points
  19. Francis Bacon Leads Humanity to the Promised Land
    4 points
  20. Hi High Wizard of B'Hive, It is an absolute privilege and a pleasure to share anything with you on B'Hive.♥️
    4 points
  21. Francis Bacon on the Light of Truth
    4 points
  22. Celebrate SirBacon.org turning 25 with us in October 2022 Deadline: Midnight September 30, 2022. Purpose: To collect memories, antidotes, or other thoughts from Baconians on how Sir Francis Bacon or SirBacon.org has impacted or influenced you. Your thoughts may be personal, professional, spiritual, none of the above or all of the above. Graphics can be included. If you are a Baconian, as I am, and Sir Francis Bacon and SirBacon.org has meaning or is important for you, please contribute a sentence or two, an essay, or more if you wish. Graphics and artwork will be accepted as well. We’ll try to put something nice together for us all to enjoy. Send contributions to 25years@SirBacon.org For ideas you can view submissions and read the full essays from 2004: A Selection of Contributors answer the Question: "What does Francis Bacon Mean To You?" Please pass on this information to Baconians and fans of SirBacon.org. Thank you! Rob at 007
    4 points
  23. Francis Bacon on Truth and Illusion
    4 points
  24. Fantastic quotation, A.P. Thank you for sharing!
    4 points
  25. The Consequences of an Independent Mind
    4 points
  26. Born for the Whole of Humankind
    4 points
  27. "Grave liberal mind contending with the rest, to seat them all in thy judicious breast." Another revealing quote I'm unfamiliar with. Did Peyton compose this poetic tribute to Lord Bacon? It suggests something of Bacon's incorruptibility in defending the Truth against ignorance. This wonderful couplet, written by someone who must have known Bacon well and marvelled at his 'centredness', as well as his sheer brilliance, also shines a light on the private loneliness of being ahead of one's time. And yet at the same time the last line suggests SFB's enormous compassion for all things and beings.
    4 points
  28. Kate, BRAVO for your new great video! This is a brilliant presentation of a very interesting subject ❤️ ! I am so happy for you to know that your video is going well. Talking about incredible synchronicities, I would like to share with you the synchronicity that takes place for me the 8th of September. I was unable to share this anecdote until now because I considered that inaproppriate. The fact is that the 8th of September, after work, with the 9th of september coming very fast, I decided to take a look at Rob's Sonnets Pyramid ... And this day, one verse immediatly grabbed my attention : "The Mortal moon hath her eclipse endur'd". Being not an expert in Shakespeare's Sonnets, I wondered if "the Mortal moon" could be a reference to Queen Elizabeth I. I decided to check it out on wikipedia ... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonnet_107 "The line about the eclipse of the moon has sometimes been interpreted as reference to death of Queen Elizabeth I" I was very pleased to see that I was right. But right after this research, I decided to take a break and to watch some youtube's videos. I swear that I was not aware of the situation in Great Britain at all !!! So, I will let you imagine my surprise discovering videos announcing the death of Queen Elizabeth II !😢 That was a very sad synchronicity !
    4 points
  29. Bacon-Shakespeare on Illusions Supported by Deceiving Arguments
    4 points
  30. I so appreciate your kind words about the portrait gallery. It was a collaboration. Without your skills and enthusiasm there would be nothing to show. Thanks to Lawrence also. I'm so glad it found the right home and is fulfilling its purpose. I don't think there is anything sinister or significant in the fact that there are no contemporary paintings showing SFB's feet, only posthumous portraits. I must admit it had never occurred to me until you pointed this out. After a quick search online I found these six full-length portraits from the period in which the subject's feet are exposed. Also attached is a note on shoes in the Elizabethan era.
    4 points
  31. Have to rekindle an old thread, but I have a question for you Eric...(or anyone else who has an answer) I'm working on a quick fun graphic for another post and needed to pen-tool a standing Bacon to paste into an image and Photoshop to make it look right. I first went to the High Resolution portraits of Bacon we put up a few months ago which is one of the most important additions to SirBacon.org ever. Your gallery Eric is a true Baconian Treasure for all Baconians to enjoy. We had to make special programming rules to incorporate the file size of these images for the amazing collection you acquired and even paid for to be displayed. THANK YOU!!!!!! https://sirbacon.org/francis-bacons-portraits-from-life/ If you just read this latest post and have not explored these images which are not legally not available anywhere else on the internet today for free at the resolutions we put up. Click on an image in the Francis Bacon Portraits Gallery and zoom in to 100%. See the detail. Imagine being the artist studying Bacon's face, his eyes, expressions to paint these paintings. Being a photographer can be very exciting. But can you even imagine Francis Bacon sitting or standing in front of you while you sketch a loose pencil frame. "Hey, Francis, can you bring your left shoulder up a bit, and your face, be who you are, the rightful heir to be King of England, and I want to see a glimmer of your secret Shakespeare theater project." My plan was to cut out a standing Bacon and reduce it by many times to end up small, maybe enhance it a bit. In no way would it take away from the original on SirBacon.org and I'd link to the original anyway (as opposed to Wiki, etc.). Then I noticed, of all these paintings, Bacon's FEET are not shown. Yet sculptures have roses on his feet, at least enough that I was hoping to clip a painting with roses on his feet. I never noticed. Is there no painting of Bacon's feet while he was alive? What about Elizabeth? Were her feet hidden? (I have not looked yet, trying to work on another post.) Were feet off-limits? I can imagine that maybe they were in those days. Some Shakespeare character must have had stinky feet or they could not smell very well in those days. OMG, the streets must have been "ripe" for we today! And, DeVere did leave a memorable impression on everybody in the room when he passed his historic fart in front of the Queen. “Something is rotten in the state of Denmark." ? See below, NO FEET.
    4 points
  32. Here's the original by Paul van Somer, circa 1618, property of Gorhambury Estate. The image you posted, which has been over-saturated, is by an unknown artist, painted after 1731 after Paul van Somer. It's owned by the NPG. (Sorry for being so pedantic.)
    4 points
  33. The Secret Work of an Age by Kate Cassidy A new cover and re-formatted extending to over 460 pages with more than 300 images, this is a must read book that will change the way you see the past, present and future, and your own place in the world. "In all periods of the world's history, and in every part of the globe, secret orders and societies have existed outside the limits of the official churches for the purpose of teaching what are called "the Mysteries": for imparting to suitable and prepared minds certain truths of human life, human nature and human destiny." For further details, reviews, and purchase information see: https://www.the-secret-work.com/
    4 points
  34. Francis Bacon's Endeavour to Advance Humanity
    4 points
  35. We bought tickets to see Ringo Starr three years ago. It looks like we finally get to see him and his band in couple weeks! What a blessing he is still alive! We need a good show. Hoping everything works out smoothly. We've never seen Ringo. I Googled "Ringo Starr and Shakespeare" today and stumbled on a 1964 skit of the Beatles doing a scene of A Midsummer Night's Dream. There is a colorized version of this, but for me the sound seemed best on this one. 🙂 If I get time, I will look for the Bacon hints. I am sure there are a few! Till then it is hard to not laugh at this video!! We saw Paul a few years ago when he was 74 years old. Amazing. In this video from '64 he is a kid! My first memory of the Beatles was when I was 4. My Dad had left to be in Vietnam for a year. My Mom cried the day he left which for me and my little brother was intense. We never saw her cry before. The second time we saw her cry? We were watching the TV news and the Beatles got off an airplane in the New Atlantis. Mom was bawling! Tears! But it was different from the time before. We got to stay up late to watch them sing later. They were cool. Way better than war. In 2001 SirBacon.org added this Beatles graphic to the site: https://sirbacon.org/links/amusements4.html
    4 points
  36. I've really been enjoying your Amusements Galleries: https://sirbacon.org/links/amusements1.html
    4 points
  37. Hi Eric, Just been having a look at Twickenham Park for another project and it’s clear that FB used Twickenham as a scriptorium hiring many scribes for his written works. Also it was used for his scientific works and had laboratories for experimentation and had the most amazing gardens full of exotic imported plants that were used for the study of poisons and medicines in finding cures for diseases. As well as botany he also studied minerals and undertook other experiments for his ‘reformation of the whole wide world for the betterment of mankind.’ There is nothing left now of TP except the lake that would have been on the land and also some huge cedar trees in this area thought to have been planted by FB. The history of Twickenham Park is interesting and Alice Chambers Bunten writes an excellent work on the subject entitled Twickenham Park and Old Richmond Palace. Twickenham Park was directly over the river from Richmond Palace (Elizabeth’s favourite Palace and where Henry VIII and she herself both died). Bacon described Twickenham as ‘my pleasure and my dwelling’ and he writes several letters from here and he also mentions it in his Promus notebook. It was crown property but Elizabeth leased it to Edward Bacon (FB’s elder half-brother) in 1574 so FB would have probably visited it from a very early age. In 1581 Edward married and went to live at Shrubland Hall with his wife. Provided that FB carried on his law studies at Gray’s Inn it would seem FB was allowed by the Queen to use Twickenham (out of term time) as his base for his scientific studies, his scriptorium and of course the writing of his Shakespeare plays. Twickenham Park had advantages in that the air was clean and healthy, it was leafy and quiet and far from prying eyes, when engaged in secret works. By 1608 following mounting debts partly amassed due to him privately having to fund his research and works he left Twickenham Park and would eventually, after Lady Anne Bacon’s death in 1610, use Gorhambury as his country residence. Many of the Shakespeare plays and poems before 1608 were likely written here in the place he considered ‘his pleasure and his dwelling’.
    4 points
  38. Certainly in the 1590's Bacon's "Project Shakespeare" hits the ground running. According to Peter Dawkins' Bacon-Shakespeare Timeline, there was a frenzy of theatrical activity - the simultaneous production of numerous plays - in an astonishingly short time. Extracts below. https://www.fbrt.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Bacon-Shakespeare_Timeline.pdf To what extent did Twickenham Park enable this spectacular flourish of literary activity? I was surprised to learn on Twickenham Museum's website that Francis Bacon had occupancy of Twickenham Park from the early 1580s, long before he became the lease holder. Perhaps his Twickenham residence had become 'Shakespeare HQ' even before the 1590s? Perhaps Twickenham Park could be seen as a possible location of the scriptorium, with additional literary workshops at Gray's Inn and Gorhambury. Has everything already been said about SFB's life at Twickenham House, or do you think it bears further investigation?
    4 points
  39. We know the inscription on the Shakespeare Monument at Stratford references Maro (Virgil). Born around 70BC. It caught my eye that on this cover of Virgil’s Aeneid in 1610 is the same emblem we find in the 1623 First Folio. in case you didn’t know, Virgil is the origin of the phrase on the Great Seal of 🇺🇸 about Novus Ordo Seclorum Magnus ab integro saeclorum nascitur ordo. and Virginia was called Arcadia, which is also from Virgil. Seeing as it was Bacon who helped colonise America along with the ‘incomparable paire’ referenced at the front of the FF, unless one can link Will Shakespeare to the founding of America (No!) this is surely yet another nugget of proof that Bacon was Shakespeare.
    4 points
  40. There you go. How could Bacon have created the works of Shakespeare? What did Bacon know about gloves? Did he merely stumble on and learn about gloves and leather in his vast quest for All Knowledge? Ha! I don't think so! Obviously Willy Shakspur, the illiterate son of a butcher-cum-glove maker had the leather knowledge to write the works! No other knowledge was needed. Just a little glove background. We Baconians just feel so defeated when "gloves" are even mentioned. It like destroys the entire Bacon was Shakespeare theory. Oh the gloves, the gloves! It had to be Willy. This should be the finale topic of the 2023 ESC. 😉
    4 points
  41. The Gratitude of William Rawley Towards Francis Bacon
    3 points
  42. Hi, there! Yes, this is my work. I did incorporate symbolism and a few cypher devices into the poem, however, I did not even notice the device that you pointed out. It really is clever, but I am sad to say it was not at all intentional. By the way, I'm a fifteen-year-old who sucks at math and wishes he was better at numerical cyphers.
    3 points
  43. My apologies ! In fact the following image ... ... seems to be in fact is a reference to the men that are mentionned under the first emblem. George Abbot (Archbishop of Canterbury) Francis Bacon, Great Chancellor of England William Herbert 1st Earl of Pembroke (By the way, I like the "Sir Gulelmo" right under "Sir Francisco "🙂 ) ... So this part has nothing to do with Lodovico Petrucci ! Sorry !
    3 points
  44. Hi Eric, I have just come across some information that I was not previously aware of relating to works that apparently contain unknown or unfamiliar images of the Great One in Francis Bacon A Bibliography of his Works and of Baconiana to the year 1750 SUPPLEMENT (Privately issued, 1959): 1] Simon Goulart, The Wise vieillard or an old man, translated out of French into English by an obscure Englishman (London: John Dawson, 1621) that 'contains a portrait of of a bearded man seated at a table closely resembling Bacon', (Gibson no, 411). A transcribed reproduction of the work is available on the Internet (see link below) but this does not reproduce the above mentioned portrait. https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo/A01992.0001.001?view=toc 2] Robert Johnson, A Letter from Mr. Robert Johnson, one of the elders at Edenborough, directed to Master William Agard at Cambridge (London: 1642) 'Woodcut Portrait of Bacon on titlepage' (Gibson, no. 452). I have not been able to trace this on the internet. As this is your area of expertise I thought it might be of some interest.🙂👍 The Phoenixes.
    3 points
  45. Hi Yann, We need a wow, wow, wow button for that one! Thanks for your kind words too K
    3 points
  46. Francis Bacon on the Elusiveness of the Truth
    3 points
  47. The Hand of Bacon in the Shakespeare 'Tapster' Manuscript https://www.dropbox.com/s/xgj88m02w8nbxxz/HENRY IV TRAILER.mp4?dl=0 https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research https://youtu.be/-7nzkrGEKeI
    3 points
  48. The Bacons and the Derings https://www.dropbox.com/s/xgj88m02w8nbxxz/HENRY IV TRAILER.mp4?dl=0 https://aphoenix1.academia.edu/research https://youtu.be/-7nzkrGEKeI
    3 points
×
×
  • Create New...