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  2. WORK IN PROGRESS FRANCIS TUDOR'S ROYAL GENEALOGY (criticism and comments most welcome)
  3. Today
  4. TRANSLATION OF E.K.RAND XXI A Song of Consolation1 to Both Academies. If my prayers, ye Sisters, had with yours availed (ah me, our plaint hath come before its time!), not vain would be the contest of our love (for oft in love resides the strife of emulous devotion): we should have gained our own by our tears, and thee as well, Apollo,2 yes thee, learned Bacon, the darling of thy father-land. What could nature more, or virtue? Thou gavest thereby the meed of thine unending fame. When the wiser part of our age read thee, they swore that it befitted thee alone to speak for ever. Him3 the too stern goddesses (ah me, what prerogative do they not claim at every turn!)4 have denied to us and to you. Worthy he was of the sky, but what prayers for such a man, that he still should tarry upon earth, can be importunate? Oh happy fate! since ’t is no blame, Bacon, but joyful eulogy to mourn thy death.5 Stay now, ye sisters, your just plaints and sighs. He cannot all6 ascend the melancholy bier. He was both ours and yours: a strife is thence arisen, and ’t is in doubt which love the greater be. The grief is common, ours and yours: such ruin could not descend upon one place alone. WILLIAM LOE, OF TRINITY COLLEGE. _____________________________________________________________________ 1. Harleian Misc. has ; Blackbourne, 2. Bacon is identified with Apollo. 3. Sudden shift of the pronoun; perhaps the poet now addresses the pars prudentior to whom he has just referred. 4. ah sibi quid nolunt saepe licere; cf. quid non crudelis voluit sibi Parca licere, Poem XVIII, 5 by the same author. 5. It would be blameworthy to mourn the gods’ dispensation in any other case, but here where Bacon is to reign exalted, sorrow turns to praise. Cf. Statius on Lucan’s birthday, Silv. ii. 7, 135, quidquid fleverat ante, nunc adoret.mnjhnb 6. Horace’s non omnis moriar. 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  5. TRANSLATION OF THE BACON SOCIETY [ELEGY 21] An Address of Consolation to the Two Universities. “O sisters! had our mutual prayers availed (But ah! our plaint has come before its day), Between us there would be a strife in love, For rivalry in love is oft concealed. We each would win our friend back by our tears, Thee, Bacon, true Apollo that thou art! Thy country’s Darling! What could Nature show, Or Virtue’s store produce, greater than THOU? From Nature and from Virtue hast thou drawn Perpetual fruits of thine immortal Name- When wisest men first studied thy works They swore that thou alone wast fit to speak. Too long the fatal three have let him stay, A self-denial they not oft permit- He sure was worthy Heaven, but is it sin To pray that such a man as he should still remain? How happy is our lot! it is no crime But rather our good fortune and our crown That we did know thee, and can mourn thy death. Ye sisters cease your tears and sad laments, The funeral pyre cannot contain him all. Both yours and ours he was; hence comes the rivalry- Which of us two bears him the greater love? Our grief is common. Could so great a ruin Fall to the ground? Or could it only lie On one small spot? Surely this could not be.” -William Loe, Trin. Coll. [Baconiana, Vol. V, New Series, No. 18, April 1897, pp. 103-109] 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  6. TRANSLATION OF WILLARD PARKER XXI A POEM OF CONDOLENCE TO BOTH UNIVERSITIES.1 If but my prayers Oh! ye Sisters, joined unto yours had prevailed, (Ah! premature our complaining), never in vain were loves’ strivings; Even as love oft concealeth strife-seeds of rival affections;2 Then by our tears we had gained thee, Bacon, the Learned-Apollo-3 Ever thy fatherland’s darling. What more could nature or virtue? Thereby the fruit hast thou given,- Meed of thy great name undying When all our wisest ones read thee, vowed they that unto thee solely, Fitted the power to speak ever. Goddesses4 stern have refused him Both unto you and to usward. Ah! why so seldom concede they Aught to the longing of mortals. Worthy was he of the heavens, Yet are our prayers not importunate, craving that here he might tarry. Oh! happy fate, since to mourn thee is but a joyful eulogium; Stay your just wailings, ye sisters; know that we cannot all enter In the sad pyre of his funeral. He was both yours and ours ever. Strife there arose then betwixt us,2 doubting which love was the greater. Your grief and ours are now common. Such a tremendous catastrophe Could not descend from the heavens down upon one single earthspot. WILLIAM LOE, Trinity College.5 1. Oxford and Cambridge. 2. Refers to the rivalry between the two Universities. 3. Master of the Muses. 4. The Fates who cut off his thread untimely. 5. Cambridge. College of Henry VIII where Bacon attended and studied under Whitgift at the instance of Queen Elizabeth. 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  7. TRANSLATION OF FATHER WILLIAM A. SUTTON 21. CONSOLATORY POEM TO BOTH UNIVERSITIES. If my prayers with yours O Sisters! had prevailed (ah! our plaintive song comes before its time), the contest of our love would not be ambiguous (sometimes too in love there lurks affectionate strife), we should be in possession of our tears and of thee, Apollo,5 the darling, learned Bacon of your native land. What more could nature or worth produce? Thence have you put forth the fruit of your undying name. When the best critics of our age read your works, they kept vowing that it was fitting that you alone should express yourself. To grant him to us and to you (sisters) the excessively dire goddesses have refused (ah! why are they so seldom willing to make concession?). He deserved heaven, but that he should yet a little while tarry on earth, what prayers are too importunate considering his worth? O happy fate! since it is not a fault but highly and auspiciously creditable to lament your death, O Bacon! Restrain at length your just tears and wailings, sisters; he cannot all enter the sad funeral pyre. He was ours and yours: thence a contest ensued, and which of our loves be the greater is uncertain. Our grief and yours is mutual; so vast a catastrophe could not be confined to one place. WILLIAM LOE, TRINITY COLLEGE. 5. Apollo, god of poetry, music, &c., is here identified with Bacon. 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  8. THE FOUR TRANSLATIONS OF THE MEMORIAE 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  9. As You Like It - A Bacon-Tudor Family Affair The pastoral drama As You Like It belongs in the tradition of entertainments put on for Queen Elizabeth stretching back to the magnificent entertainment provided for her by Leicester at Kenilworth, at Bisham produced and written by Bacon, and the dramatic devices written by Bacon for the Earl of Essex to be presented on her Anniversary Day in 1592 and 1595. The device Of Love and Self-Love written by Bacon in 1595 includes two speeches delivered by a Hermit: The Hermits first Speech and The Hermits Second Speech in the Presence, in wish of Contemplation or Studies who in the device is dressed as a philosopher representing Contemplation. The figure of the Hermit is repeatedly referred to in several Shakespeare plays dating from around the period: I Henry VI, Titus Andronicus, Love’s Labour’s Lost, Richard II, The Merchant of Venice, and As You Like It. The court of Queen Elizabeth permeates the background of the play. The role of Rosalind, daughter of Duke Senior shares similarities with Queen Elizabeth and Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester informs the figures of Duke Senior and Sir Rowland de Boys, with their royal son Robert Tudor Devereux, reflected in the usurping brother Duke Frederick (Essex attempted to usurp Bacon’s claim on the throne) and the character of Orlando, youngest son of Sir Rowland de Boys, a dramatic refraction of his blood father Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester.
  10. Here is another one that will be a little lengthy but I will see if I can get it on one post. This is also from As You Like It - and is found near the top of the first column on page 197 in scene 3.2. Here the characters Jaques and Orlando are engaging in a bit of banter about which one of them is a fool, and includes this piece of their conversation: Jaq. By my troth, I was seeking for a Foole, when I found you. Orl. He is drown’d in the brooke, looke but in, and you shall see him. Jaq. There I shal see mine owne figure. Orl. Which I take to be either a foole, or a Cipher. The solution here must consider that though Jacques will see his owne figure, what figure will he see? The simple count for Jaques is 69, the Kay count is 147. Neither of those fits the expected Bacon signature counts. But Jaques is also a “foole” according to Orlando. And Orlando takes the figure of Jaques to be either that of a “foole” or a Cipher. The simple count for “foole” is 50, the Kay count is 102. Neither of these make cipher sense either. But Orlando says that Jaques will see the foole or Cipher when he looks in the brooke. When Jaques looks in the brooke he sees his reflection and at that moment the “foole” or “Cipher” is seen. The “two fooles” together (himself and his reflection) add up to 100 which is the simple Cipher, and a figure, for “Francis Bacon”. Additionally, the word “foole” as a reflection can be seen to contain the figure “100” in the reverse of “ool” or “loo” or “100”. This also has some semblance to a cipher candidate in King Lear where there is the phrase twice asking “Where’s my foole?” I will discuss it more later. We’ve seen that in this play of As You Like It two of the signature ciphers were related to the words “Clowne” and “Foole”. So I then found it interesting that also in this play in the last scene, on page 206, second column about a third of the way down, there is Duke Senior saying: Du.Se. He uses his folly like a stalking-horse, and under the presentation of that he shoots his wit. Defintions of a “Stalking-horse” include the following: 1. Something used to cover one's true purpose; a decoy. 2. A person or thing that is used to conceal someone’s real intentions. 3. Something used to mask a purpose. 4. Something serving to conceal plans; a fictitious reason that is concocted in order to conceal the real reason 5. A person whose participation in a proceeding is made use of to prevent its real design from being suspected. In cryptology this idea has been termed the “cover” text concealing a “plain” text. So Duke Senior refers to the Clowne as one who pretends to be a fool in order to “shoot his wit”. Obviously the playwright understands the concept and uses the plays often to “shoot his wit”. Also, we know that the court 'fool' had express permission to speak 'truth to power'. So is it really that much more of a stretch to consider that a great wit as this playwright was could step up this “stalking horse” concept to camouflage more than he’s been given credit for? Spymaster Sir Francis Walsingham also used this term of a stalking-horse, so it seems to have had usage in intelligence circles at the time.
  11. Thank you very much Lawrence! I'm glad that I could add something to Mather's great discovery. And also to the great discoveries by A Phoenix, Light-of-Truth, Eric, Allisnum2er and others current and past of the Bacon-Shakespeare truth seekers. I realize that most of the ciphers I post were originally discovered by others so I try to at least add some additional insights or analysis to them. Perhaps at some point we may see if we can select a subset of all the known ciphers that we think are the most unlikely to be argued as occurring from chance and could withstand scrutiny from at least the non-Stratfordian community. This would strengthen the already strong non-cipher evidence.
  12. Yesterday
  13. The Proof is in the Pudding and the Pudding is on it's way...
  14. Hi again Allisnum2er. Thanks for the splendid images etc. The early one is of particular value. My interest stems mainly from the image at the top of title page of Euclid's Elements by Billingsley/Dee. I noted the winged Time figure which brought to mind the circular image on the title page of New Atlantis. The old man reminded me of John Dee, and the younger man Bacon. The lead figure is a boy with a whirligig, boys play with toys (Richard 3: the alphabet "toy") and this made me think of the book of Job like this: BOY ==> BOI his toy turns in the wind: ==> IOB (Job). There are some references to boys and the abc in Shakespeare, and the abc is even found in BACON. The hints about Bacon and 'boys' may well be applied here. If the letters could turn like a whirligig in the wind, then why not turn the abc values of I O B ==> 9 14 2 : 9 turns around (14 2) to make 14 29 4 turns around 1 to make 41 So finally we have Job 41:29 IMHO that is. 😄 In passing: You are probably right about Lotd, what else could it be? I wonder if that Robert Dudley was related? Also, ref Emblemata Sacra : When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I became a man, I put away childish things. I Corinthians 13:11 Not much fun in the bible.
  15. Thanks, but I am putting something together for SirBacon.org that was someone's else's very hard work. But its a secret for now. 😉
  16. Open minds think alike ! 😊 Now, I am looking forward to reading your upcoming post about Don Quixote !
  17. Funny thing I went to bed last night thinking about Don Quixote and all through the night that was on my mind and in my dreams. Why? Because I woke up working on something for later this week to be published on SirBacon.org about Don Quixote. 😉
  18. Yesterday evening, my research led me to Don Quixote and the famous Cide Hamete Benengeli. Here is the great work on the subjet by Francis Carr: https://sirbacon.org/quixote.html Yesterday, before going to bed, I wondered what was the simple cipher of "Cide Hamete Benengeli" The answer ? 141 For me, 141 is the simple cipher of FRANCIS (67) TUDOR (74) This morning, I woke up with this thought in mind : " It would have been great if instead of "Hamete" it was "Amete"!" Why? Because Amete could be seen as a transliteration of Emeth "AMT" the hebrew word for Truth Cide Amete Benengeli would provide us with the letters B,A,C for BACon And the simple cipher of Cide Amete Benengeli is ... 133 133 = 100 + 33 = FRANCIS BACON - 33 133 = ROSI CROSSE Before heading off to work, I dedided to take a brief glimpse in the second part of Don Quixote (1615). Imagine my surprise ! 🙂 https://archive.org/details/segundapartedeli00cerguat/page/472/mode/2up Sorry, I am not an expert in "Bacon and Don Quixote", so maybe someone already mentioned this by the past. Along the way, I noticed something else that is, in my view, very interesting. Last year, I shared with you my thoughts regarding one of the poems of "Underwoods" by Ben Jonson https://archive.org/details/workesofbenjamin00jons/page/210/mode/2up Notice that in this passage Ben Jonson mentions Amadis de Gaule and Don Quixote. Here is the 277th leaf of Don Quixote Part 2 ... https://archive.org/details/segundapartedeli00cerguat/page/554/mode/2up 277 = 100 (FRANCIS BACON) + 177 (WILLIAM SHAKE-SPEARE)
  19. TRANSLATION OF E.K.RAND XX On the Death of the Same, etc. If only the worthy, Bacon, shall lament thy fate, ah none will do it, there’ll be none, believe me, there’ll be none. Weep ye now truly, Clio, and Clio’s sisters.1 Ah, fallen is the tenth Muse, the glory of the choir. Ah never really was Apollo himself unhappy before! When shall he ever gain another so to love him? Ah me! the full number he shall have no more: now must Apollo be content with nine Muses. _____________________________________________________________________ 1. This poet seems to have been reading Ovid’s Art of Love, i. 27, Clio Cliusque sorores. 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  20. TRANSLATION OF THE BACON SOCIETY [ELEGY 20] On the death of the same. “If, BACON, none may mourn thy death but he Who’s worthy, surely there’ll no mourner be. But weep, weep, Clio! with thy Sister’s bland, Fall’n is the Tenth Muse, Flower of thy band. Ah! ne’er Apollo knew true grief before. How can he, loving, be indifferent? He must with Muses nine himself content, Ill-pleased their number cannot be one more.” 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  21. TRANSLATION OF WILLARD PARKER XX ON THE DEATH OF THE SAME, ETC. If but the worthy lament thee, then-then believe me, O Bacon, There will be none who are mourners. Clio1 and sisters of Clio,2 Weep ye now truly, ye Muses; fallen is the Tenth,4 your choir’s glory. Never before has Apollo3 bowed his head truly in sorrow; When shall there e’er be another who with such full heart shall love him. Never again be your number full and complete as aforetime,- Now must Apollo3 content him with the Nine Muses-nine only!4 1. Muse of History 2. Sister Muses. 3. Leader of the Muses. 4. A wonderful tribute to Bacon as a poet - the tenth Muse! Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  22. TRANSLATION OF FATHER WILLIAM A. SUTTON 20. ON THE DEATH OF THE SAME, ETC. If none but the worthy should mourn your death, O Bacon! none, trust me, none will there be. Lament now sincerely, O Clio! and sisters of Clio, ah! the tenth muse and the glory of the choir has perished. Ah! never before has Apollo himself been truly unhappy! Whence will there be another to love him so? Ah! he is no longer going to have the full number; and unavoidable is it now for Apollo to be content with nine muses. 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  23. FOUR TRANSLATIONS OF THE MEMORIAE 1 Minute Trailer: https://youtu.be/UeIqR-bA6cE Full Video: https://youtu.be/n3UL4MfyAZc Book: https://www.academia.edu/113883645/The_Secret_Links_Between_the_Rosicrucian_Freemasonic_Memoriae_1626_Containing_Thirty_Two_Verses_Dedicated_To_Francis_Bacon_Our_Shakespeare_The_First_Folio_of_the_Shakespeare_Works_1623_and_the_Stratford_Monument
  24. Imaginary Erdős Number - Numberphile
  25. Last week
  26. Do you see "F B" four times on page 33? 😉 https://archive.org/details/decameroncontain00bocc/page/33/mode/1up
  27. Hi Rob, I hope you are well. Indeed, R is in the middle. Good idea, I shall see what is the result if we skip the R. Regarding the windows panes, I noticed that some of them had vertical stripes and some of them had horizontal stripes. But it is difficult to see all the panes and to say if it was intended or not. EDIT : In fact, the result is the same if we skip the R or the Y.
  28. I'm so glad you are here, Yann! 🙂 The letters went right past by me barely noticed, but soon you brought them up I believe you do have a point. They do look like a potential biliteral cipher, almost in our face. How did I miss it!? But the thought of a biliteral cipher with the 100 window panes did cross my mind. So with 31 letters, isn't the middle one the R? If I get time, which doesn't look good for tonight, I'll poke around... 😉
  29. Here are some thoughts. The sentence with its uppercase and lowercase letters lead me to believe that Bi-literal cipher could be in play. The problem is that there are 31 letters. Here are three possibilities : ABAAA AABAB BAAAA AAAAA BAABA AAABA A I F R A T C A BAAAA ABABB AAAAA AAAAB AABAA AABAA T M A B E E Or, if we skip the Y that is the only stylized letter ABAAA AABAB BAAAA AAAAB AABAA AABAA I F R B E E Personally, I like the first possibility ( FRAT. I.C.) and the last one ( FREE - I.B.) FREE = 33 = BACON (simple cipher) FREE = 67 ( reverse cipher) = FRANCIS (simple cipher) I.B. for Iachin and Boaz BEE. What do you think ? EDIT : Now, I wonder if the square windows panes could hide a message. (Imagine two colors , light blue and white, working by group of five from top to bottom and from left to right😊)
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