Bacon-Shakespeare Secret Republican Father of the Modern World

by A. Phoenix


Both Bacon and Shakespeare (obviously treated separately by orthodox scholars) have very largely been presented as conservative political thinkers whereas more recently several modern scholars have finally begun to partly recognise the republican themes running through both the canons, which completely revolutionises and transforms our understanding of the first philosopher-poet of the modern world.

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A Line In Hamlet’s Speech Taken From Masonic Ritual

by Richard Allan Wagner


Hamlet’s “To Be or Not to Be” speech is, possibly, the last place people would expect to find a line from Masonic ritual—yet, word-for-word, there it is—hiding like an “undiscovered” treasure as countless actors throughout the centuries have unwittingly spoken the words without gleaning the full measure of their meaning or origin.

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An Enlightened Spirit : Authorship Question Part 4

By Deslie McClellan


An Enlightened Spirit : Authorship Question Part 4 : A Chapter from Deslie McClellan’s uplifting book : Prince of Our Dreams : Young Shakespeare

“The most compelling proof that Bacon was Shakespeare is the enlightened–one might say, luminous–spirit of the author. The Bard has a matchless understanding of the moral beauty of life and its diviner mysteries. His spirituality is exquisite. Dr. Bucke, cited earlier, calls it cosmic consciousness, whereby the author palpably feels the radiance of heaven’s wisdom and heaven’s love in his own awareness, and inevitably must express it, so wholly compelling is that “muse” of divine inspiration within him.”

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An Enlightened Spirit : Authorship Question Part 4

Francis Bacon’s Portraits from Life Gallery

By Eric Roberts


“The purpose of this gallery of portraits is to provide a visual complement to the countless written texts by and about Sir Francis Bacon. We can be fairly certain that Francis himself commissioned at least ten of the fourteen pictures in this inventory of portraits produced during his lifetime. It is also certain that he wanted future generations to be able to see what the man behind the words actually looked like. During the course of research, it soon became evident that the only digital copies of Francis Bacon’s portraits available online were of small size and low resolution, and that there was a genuine need to provide public access to better quality images. Only then could the subtle details and facial expressions captured in these portraits be appreciated.Thus, the decision to purchase and assemble the best images available on behalf of all Baconians and admirers of the life and works of Francis Bacon was a ’no brainer’. This project would not have been realized without the help of Lawrence Gerald, Rob Fowler, Peter Dawkins, Gary Keegan, A. Phoenix, and The Francis Bacon Society.”

View the Gallery: Francis Bacon’s Portraits from Life

Shakespeare Sonnet 55 : Francis Bacon’s Ode to Hiram Abiff

by Richard Allan Wagner


When I was initiated into the Freemasonic Fraternity, I was immediately struck by the uncanny similarity between the words in Masonic Ritual and the words in the Shakespearean plays and sonnets. It’s as if those words had been forged in the same crucible. Furthermore, many parallels of Masonic language and symbolism, as well as specific bits of business in Masonic Ritual, show up again-and-again throughout the pages of Shakespeare, the most important of which is to be found in Sonnet 55. Actually, the wording of Sonnet 55, unlike the other 153 sonnets, is designed to serve as a bridge connecting Freemasonry with Shakespeare.

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The Stratford Shakespeare Monument

by Peter Dawkins


Peter Dawkins has wriTTen an Illuminating article about the Shakespeare monument in Stratford while describing some very interesting ciphers embedded  in the inscription. It is a must read for any of us.

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Honorificabilitudinitatibus: Bacon’s Magical Word

by Richard Allan Wagner


The word that seems to have loomed most prominently in Francis Bacon’s mind was the 27 letter Latin word honorificabilitudinitatibus (Act 5, Scene 1 of Love’s Labor’s Lost). Although the word had been toyed with by many of Bacon’s predecessors, it was destined to be his magical word—his, and his alone. We can see evidence of his tinkering with roots of the word in his Promus: honoris, honores, honorem, honorificabo, and in his parchment folder (now known as the Northumberland Manuscript) we see honorificabilitudini. Why was Bacon so drawn to the word? What special properties did it possess?

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Is Sir Francis Bacon Shakespeare?

Video by Susan Roberts member of the Francis Bacon Society


Susan Roberts, a member of the Francis Bacon Society, delivers with clarity a fascinating, erudite and comprehensive account of Francis Bacon’s life. The theories of Authorship and the Royal Birth are carefully examined using compelling historical detail.

This video was made independently of the Francis Bacon Society.

An invitation to all viewers. If you would like to contribute your creative work, concerning Francis Bacon, to be shown on the Francis Bacon Society Youtube channel, please email francis.bacon.society@gmail.com